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Meeting Minutes Return to Committee
Meeting Minutes
Office of the Onondaga County Legislature
Court House, Room 407 * 401 Montgomery Street * Syracuse, New York 13202
(315) 435-2070 Fax: (315) 435-8434

DEBORAH L. MATURO
Clerk
J. RYAN McMAHON, II
Chairman
KATHERINE FRENCH
Deputy Clerk

 

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION COMMITTEE MINUTES – DECEMBER 14, 2016

MICHAEL E. PLOCHOCKI, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Dr. Chase, Mrs. Tassone, Mrs. Rapp

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Burtis

ALSO ATTENDING:  See attached list

 

Chair Plochocki called the meeting to order at 9:10 A.M.  A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mrs. Tassone, to waive the reading of the proceedings from the previous committee.  MOTION CARRIED.  A motion was made by Dr. Chase, seconded by Mrs. Rapp, to approve the minutes from the previous committee.  MOTION CARRIED. 

 

1.     WATER ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION:  Tom Rhoads, Commissioner

        a.     INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Approving Proposed Improvements for the Harbor Brook Drainage District Consisting of Miscellaneous Culvert and Chemical Improvements in and for the County of Onondaga, New York

 

Chair Plochocki said the committee approved public hearings for items 1a – 1n last month and briefly discussed the projects.  At that time he noted that they would be coming back this month for further detail.  Since then, across the board, anything having to do with bonds or capital projects has been changed to informational.  This means that the committee will now have three bites at the apple with discussion today, and at some point, presumably January, some or all will return.  Mrs. Rapp asked who made this decision.  Chair Plochocki said that he assumes it came from Chairman McMahon.  Ms. Lesniak noted that the public hearings were not taking place until January.

 

Mr. Rhoads:

  • Introduced Nick Capozza and Mike Lannon – Mr. Lannon handles things inside the treatment plant, i.e. treatment, Mr. Capozza handles everything outside the plant, i.e. sewer pipe, flood control drainage district, conveyance

Chair Plochocki suggested that they receive a general understanding of the projects today as they have another month to get detailed information before voting on these items. 

 

        b.     INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of $800,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay Costs of Improvements for the Harbor Brook Drainage District Consisting of Miscellaneous Culvert and Channel Improvements ($800,000)

 

  • Items a and b same item – a) project resolution, b) borrowing resolution
  • 1+ mile culvert repair, 110 year old infrastructure; total project $800,000 - amending resolution, requesting $200,000 for Phase 1; total project 6,600 feet
  • Real Property District, breaking into smaller bites so no one chokes

In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Mr. Rhoads confirmed that real property districts are on the tax rolls.  Drainage districts are paid for through real property taxes.  This is not a general fund or sanitary district item, it is a special district.

 

Chair Plochocki asked if it would be fair to say these projects were chosen over others for various reasons of urgency.  Mr. Capozza said that they use a means assessment - evaluate the infrastructure and try to address the needs in the 6-year capital plan.  It is time for this infrastructure to be rehabilitated, on a continual basis, to avoid larger scale emergency repairs.

 

Mrs. Rapp asked what $200,000 would buy.  Mr. Capozza said they would be doing concrete repairs and some washout repairs from a large storm several years ago.  Starting at the intersection of Delaware and Amy Streets, and working their way downstream, they will be using a pressure applied concrete to restore the concrete surfaces to provide another 15-20 years of service life.  It doesn’t buy a lot, but they will use strategic purchasing, and have established contracts that will maximize resources.  

 

  • Also fencing repairs; Harbor Brook  shallow ditch in some areas but raises quickly with rain, very hazardous, flashy streams throughout the city, loss of life injuries related to people washed away by culverts in drainage district
  • Restoring flood capacity, improving safety conditions, and hope to keep infrastructure operating

Dr. Chase asked if everything around the fencing area would be cleared out when doing the repair, i.e. brush.  Mr. Rhoads said that in places where the fencing has been torn, ripped or the fabric is off, they will likely have to do that in order to reattach fabric and/or install posts.

 

Dr. Chase said that they initially wanted $800,000 for this project.  Mr. Rhoads said that they put in a phased capital plan of $800,000 over 5-years; initially asking for $200,000.  Dr. Chase asked if the first phase would complete a quarter of the work needed.  Mr. Capozza that the $200,000 will go as far as it will go to complete the immediate needs for fencing and concrete repair.  They will continually assess other areas for the next round of bonding.  In answer to Dr. Chase, Mr. Capozza said that the $800,000 was for spot repairs of the 1.2 mile infrastructure, basically just keeping things in repair.  Dr. Chase questioned where the $800,000 figure came from.  Mr. Rhoads said that it was to complete a 15-20 year maintenance project over the next 5 years.  They will not be replacing the entire thing with a huge capital project in the tens of millions of dollars, it is just capital maintenance.

 

        c.     INFORMATIONAL: A Resolution Approving Proposed Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District Consisting of the Oak Orchard Wastewater Treatment Plant Secondary Clarifier Rehabilitation in and for the County of Onondaga, New York

        d.     INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of $950,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay Costs of Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District, Consisting of the Oak Orchard Wastewater Treatment Plant Secondary Clarifier Rehabilitation ($950,000)

 

  • c & d for engineering design of secondary clarifier rehabilitation
  • Oak Orchard serves many parts of Clay and a portion of Cicero, 2nd largest treatment plant, in service over 35 years
  • Clarifiers critical to process, complete rehabilitation; will come back for approval of construction once they have cost estimate

In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Mr. Rhoads said that this will not increase capacity – just keeps the plant going.  In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mr. Rhoads said that nothing being presented would increase the main plate capacity of any of the infrastructure. 

 

In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mr. Rhoads said that they are asking for $950,000 now and the total project costs are $7.1 million.  Dr. Chase said that this was only for engineering.  Mr. Rhoads said that these are old pieces of equipment.  As briefly discussed last month, the costs to upgrade Oak Orchard’s capacity was $96 million five years ago.  The treatment plant assets have a replacement value around $1 billion dollars and Mr. Capozza’s side is north of $1.5 billion dollars.  It is a lot of money; will address round numbers at the end. 

 

In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mr. Rhoads said that the total project has not been approved in any form.  It is part of the published long-term capital plan and the first phase of the project.  The total cost is an estimate.  This request is to prepare the engineering report, submit to DEC, and then provide better cost estimates for construction.

 

        e.     INFORMATIONAL: A Resolution Approving the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Baldwinsville Treatment Plant within the Onondaga County Sanitary District

        f.      INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of an Additional $1,800,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Baldwinsville Treatment Plant in and for the Onondaga County Sanitary District ($1,800,000) 

  • NYS SPDES permit requires dechlorination

In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mr. Lannon said that $1.8 million was for construction.  The Legislature has already approved the engineering portion.

 

  • Engineering at 50% of design; disinfection required by May 2018, need to begin construction early next year to meet permit deadline – subject to fines up to $37,5000 per day and 1 year in jail for not meeting deadline

        g.     INFORMATIONAL: A Resolution Approving the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Metro Wastewater Treatment Plant within the Onondaga County Sanitary District

       

        h.     INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of an Additional $21,355,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Metro Wastewater Treatment Plant in and for the Onondaga County Sanitary District ($21,355,000)

 

  • Work required by ACJ, last large gray piece for phosphorus removal; was a time when they were going to loop the lake with an effluent discharge pipe with costs around $500 million dollars, worked with NYS to continue to allow discharge directly to Onondaga Lake with process improvements to optimize the phosphorus treatment system
  • Construction costs $21,355,000, plant in service over 10 years - subject to penalties if not completed

Chair Plochocki asked what the additional $21,355,000 was in addition to.  Mr. Rhoads said that they engineered it, and spent $146 million in 2005.  Chair Plochocki said that additional can mean two things, additional to a specific project or in addition to the whole kit and caboodle.  Mr. Rhoads said that this should wind the clock on the gray ACJ items.  The jury is still out on the ACJ green.  Chair Plochocki said that these are increased costs beyond what was planned.  Mr. Rhoads said, “No, this has been in our long-term capital plan for a while”.  The way these are formulated the first part of the project is the engineering, and the additional is for the construction.

 

In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mr. Rhoads said that the engineering has been approved, and will be submitted to the DEC any day now, once they receive their final approval it will be put out for bid.

 

Chair Plochocki said that the wording “increased costs” will jump out to legislators and asked if the wording meant that there was increased costs beyond what was originally planned for the construction.  Mr. Rhoads said that was not what was meant.  The costs of the project has grown through the engineering process.  If they were to look back 3-4 years ago it was a smaller project.  Bond projects follow a resolution format as one continuous project for EFC funding and DEC progress.  They came to the Legislature for engineering as a whole project, then come back for construction, which is the additional component of the project.

 

Mrs. Rapp asked how much phosphorus this would take out, and how they would know if it works.  Mr. Rhoads said that they have a pilot and will take the impacts learned through the pilot testing.  The phosphorus number averages 0.1 and the state does not like to see spikes.  Spikes are hard with the current process so the improvements will change where they insert chemicals, the types of chemicals, and the sand used in the process.  They will also be replacing gates and hardware for a more sensitive process and better ability to control the process.  They want to optimize phosphorus so that spikes don’t go over the rolling average, particularly in the summer when there are opportunities for the hazardous algae bloom.

  • Dealing with difficult chemistry, adding a number of chemicals, physical chemical process
  • Very aggressive chemistry, replacing items 10-11 years old, original construction used material unable to withstand chemical – using higher grade stainless steel to help endure conditions; pipes must be welded back together almost monthly

Chair Plochocki said that his question was a variation of what he asked early.  The other projects generally use the verbiage “to pay cost of improvements”, where this resolution says “to pay the increased costs of improvements”, and asked how to explain that adjective - why is it here and not in the others.  Mr. Rhoads said he did not know, resolutions are written by bond counsel.  Ms. Tarolli said that she did not know if this was just verbiage, but would confer with bond counsel.  Chair Plochocki said that at least one legislator, though not himself, will want to know the exact increase before voting on this item.  If this is just wording, they might want to take it out. 

 

        i.      INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Approving Proposed Improvements for the Bear Trap Ley Creek Drainage District Consisting of the North Midler Culvert Improvement Project in and for the County Of Onondaga, New York

 

        j.      INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of $130,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay Costs of Improvements for the Bear Trap Ley Creek Drainage District, Consisting of the North Midler Culvert Improvement Project ($130,000)

 

  • Drainage district project, culvert goes under railroad, has hole, over 60 years old
  • Turned over to WEP in 1970’s, reaching end of life, culvert failed, made emergency repair in 2016, quick band aid, put plate over it and paved, now want to put rest of culvert into condition
  • Borrowing money due to real property drainage district assessment

In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mr. Rhoads said that the sum was for the entire project. 

 

        k.     INFORMATIONAL: A Resolution Approving Proposed Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District Consisting of the Meadowbrook Limestone Wastewater Treatment Plant Disinfection System and Collection System Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York

 

        l.      INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of $11,725,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay Costs of Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District, Consisting of the Meadowbrook Limestone Wastewater Treatment Plant Disinfection System and Collection System Project ($11,725,000)

 

  • Work required by SPDES permit – new permit July 2014, chlorine residuals no longer allowed in Limestone Creek, residual so small required change in process, will use UV disinfection
  • 2nd oldest treatment plant, built in the 1970’s
  • Rehabilitating clarifiers critical to process because of I & I, clarifiers prevent solids from overflowing into stream during wet weather overflows, replacing disinfection to meet new permit deadline of May 2018, and heavy electrical improvements to keep plant operating
  • Project at design phase, will then go out for bid, $11,725,000 construction costs

In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mr. Rhoads confirmed that the design had been approved, completed and previously paid for.  Why one said additional and this does not, he does not know, but authorizing the project is necessary to meet states permit.  Chair Plochocki said that it is difficult to get the Legislature to approve large amounts of money as there are a lot of projects from different quarters looking for approval.  The nuances make a difference, i.e. engineering already approved, waste of money not to approve construction.  Those sort of details will make all the difference in approval at this point.  For the most part, the questions he is asking are assisting in making legislators see varying degrees of improved value in getting these items approved.  Mr. Rhoads said that he applauds them for asking the questions so that they are better able to help peers understand.

 

In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Mr. Rhoads said that the $21,355,000 million dollar project was an ACJ phosphorus optimization project that did not have a specific end date.  Mrs. Rapp asked if they could wait on this project.  Mr. Rhoads said that he would seek their help in not kicking this down the road.  They are already starting to have asset failures, welding pipes on a monthly basis.  As it is, they won’t see this project completed for another 3 years and he is not sure they will limp home.  Money spent on the cost for emergency repairs, evening personnel, and special equipment would be better spent on a planned capital improvement process, similar to emergency car repair various routine maintenance – costs much more.   

 

Mrs. Rapp said that the conversation will be, do they have to do all of these things right now.  Mr. Rhoads said each one of these are necessary improvements.  If he had his druthers, things like the asset management on the phosphorus optimization would make it as the asset management component of the project is very critical.

 

        m.    INFORMATIONAL: A Resolution Approving Proposed Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District Consisting of the Camillus Force Main Replacement Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York

 

        n.     INFORMATIONAL:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of $2,000,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay Costs of Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District, Consisting of the Camillus Force Main Replacement Project ($2,000,000)

 

Chair Plochocki asked if this was construction.  Mr. Rhoads said that it is all things for Phase 1 of what will likely be a long project.

  • 36,600 foot long pipe, approximately 7 miles, connects old Village of Camillus WWTP converted into pump station to Westside pump station, requesting first phase, likely to be $10 million total
  • Hope to replace section from the village through the Bennett Road Sewer District in Phase 1, section highest priority due to SmartBall identifying 170 anomalies, section goes through subdivision; 4 emergency repairs over last 5 years, extreme property damage if emergency repair occurs in subdivision
  • Old oversized pipe, anticipated growth never materialized, wastewater goes up hill slowly and becomes septic causing hydrogen sulfide gas, mixes with water and creates sulfuric acid, roasting crown, continue to see failures - previous project to manage failure dosed with chemicals not flow paced and roasted the bottom of the pipe
  • Project begins putting in redundant parallel line and/or other options in design, replace before catastrophe; runs along Nine Mile Creek - another reason for repair

In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Mr. Rhoads said that they have had a lot of engineering discussion, SmartBall technology and typical costs for the replacement work, but have not completed the specific engineering to put the project out for bid.  They believe this amount will carry them through the first 2 miles of the pipe.

 

In answer to Dr. Chase, Mr. Rhoads confirmed that none of the 7 miles were in good shape, but a number of complexities have moved this section to the head of the line.  The condition creates a likelihood of failure throughout the entire pipe, but the consequences of failure on the first section are the highest. 

 

In answer to Dr. Chase, Mr. Rhoads confirmed they would be making the pipe smaller and more efficient.  Dr. Chase questioned how this would work if they were only replacing 2 miles of the pipe.  Mr. Rhoads said that most likely the contractor would use bypass pumping for the first 2 miles and then either push a new pipe through the old or install a parallel pipe.  Mrs. Rapp asked if the prophylactic approach would work.  Mr. Rhoads said that they would likely replace the pipe with a smaller HDPE pipe, but they have to make sure that they don’t go too small, if they push inside the old pipe.  Optimizing the pipe diameter will be evaluated in design to determine the best approach.  Mrs. Rapp said that push through seems as if it would save a lot of money.  Mr. Rhoads said that they don’t have to pay for bypass pumping when they go in parallel and contractors make a lot of money on those big pumps. 

 

Chairman Plochocki asked if the first phase, taking place in the Village of Camillus, would impact Camillus Cutlery.  Mr. Capozza clarified that it was actually the Town of Camillus.  The Village of Camillus pumps to this area in the Town of Camillus by the highway garage.  Chair Plochocki said that it was starting at the highway garage, therefore it was not actually replacing the main in the village.  Mr. Capozza apologized, saying he should have clarified this earlier.  Mr. Rhoads said that it was where the old village treatment plant used to be.  Mr. Capozza said that he could not remember the original ownership, but it was part of the consolidation plan dating back to the 1960’s.  Chair Plochocki said that while not playing favorites, this was possible the most important project.

  • Mr. Capozza and Mr. Lannon do a great job obtaining EFC funding, requires extensive paperwork, aggressively pursue grants
  • Projects weren’t grant eligible, pursuing low interest financing, projects associated with SPDES permits get a better score, ACJ projects get an even better score, may be able to get EFC rate support - Onondaga County and EFC both have Triple A credit, with EFC rate support would pay half the current interest rate, currently means paying for projects at less than 2%
  • 20 year debt $61,15720 per million borrowed @ 2%, divided by 183,511 sanitary units equals rate impact of $0.33, $0.37 at 3% - simply round number estimates as some projects are drainage districts, some are engineering and only borrow for 5 years, 20 year investment for most projects

Chair Plochocki asked to be provided with a copy of the debt service estimates read by Mr. Rhoads.

 

In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Mr. Rhoads said that the projects total $49.6 million and emphasized that these were round numbers as they don’t know what the market will be.  In round numbers this would cost the average home owner an additional $16.53 per year. 

  • Currently paying $411.11 per rate; City of Oswego wasn’t comfortable making investments, now have large number of DEC personnel present and rate now over $800 per household
  • If County doesn’t make investments in these projects the DEC does go away – our rate lower than national average and far less than other municipalities not making investments, i.e. City of Oswego, City of Oneida – didn’t make investments in time, became consent order projects, which decreased the time and increased project costs, now going through rate shock

Mrs. Rapp asked when these costs would come online.  Mr. Rhoads said that they do not borrow the money when authorized.  The fiscal team borrows annually for the next twelve months horizon, i.e. $21 million dollar project debt likely phased in over three year span.  He then emphasized that people are paying $50-$60 per month for cell phones cost, yet only paying $35.60 per month for sewer service which is a critical utility. 

 

Mrs. Rapp asked if there were a similar amount of projects behind these for the following year.  Mr. Lannon said that the total CIP for the next five years was $190 million dollars.  Mrs. Rapp said that they would be spending $40 million each year and wouldn’t be paying them off in five years so the rate will continue to escalate.  Mr. Rhoads said that they need to help the rest of their peers understand that they are asking to maintain well over $2 billion worth of infrastructure, which was built in the 70’s and very early 80’s. 

 

Dr. Chase asked if there was any way to avoid all of this coming due at the same time once again.  Mr. Rhoads said that he is the commissioner hitting this 40 year treatment plant mark.  In their industry electrical equipment last 10-20 years, mechanical equipment 20 years and physical assets may last 40-45 years.  What they are trying to do, and what these projects are typically also about, is an asset management approach.  Next month they will share asset management information.   They are trying to phase in immediate repairs with 5 and 10 year capital improvements.  The Legislature likes to approve bundled projects, however they would prefer an annual allocation for capital assigned to whatever asset has the most need.  Project approaches have some efficiencies with everything needed within that particular fence or line of pipe done at once.  However, in several instances they are not bringing forward the entire projects, i.e. Harbor Brook culvert, Camillus pipe.  Annual allocation would allow the opportunity to look at the risk for likelihood of failure and consequence to apply scarce resources.  They understand they can’t come forward with all of it, but they either have SPDES permits, an ACJ, or assets failing, and the consequences of failure are dramatic on the environment or public safety.

 

Chair Plochocki thanked Mr. Rhoads for the presentation.

 

2.     METROPOLITAN WATER BOARD:  I. Holly Rosenthal, Executive Director

        a.     Amending Resolution No. 216-1966, as Amended, Regarding the Rules and Regulations of the Metropolitan Water Board

        b.     Authorizing the Transfer of Surplus Inventory to the Onondaga County Water Authority to Advance Consolidated Services to be Performed on Behalf of the Onondaga County Water District

 

Chair Plochocki referenced the inventory sheets attached to the resolution number 2b.  Ms. Rosenthal said that it was active inventory and would change by yearend.  The resolution references these items, but is written to allow this and other materials.

 

Mr. Rosenthal discussed items 2a and 2b together, starting with item 2b:

  • 12-31-16 last day of operations for MWB, assets being leased to OCWA, employees being transferred to OCWA, now asking for remaining personal items to be transferred to OCWA, i.e. vehicles, tools, equipment, current inventory; items paid for with water district funds

Dr. Chase said that during the budget process it appeared as if MWB had considerable money in fund balance, questioned where this would go.  Ms. Rosenthal said that the fund balance will be maintained and drawn down over many years to help pay the current debt of MWB, the terminal tank project and the debt incurring for the CARE project.  The County and a combination of ad valorem funds, fund balance, and contributions by OCWA will be used to pay that debt. 

 

Mrs. Rapp asked if OCWA was actually taking some of the debt.  Chair Plochocki said no.  In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Ms. Rosenthal confirmed that OCWA was contributing to paying off the debt in some instances.  Ms. Tarolli said that there are some projects that go to future OCWA relations that they will go into debt for.  The existing debt will remain with the County fund balance.  OCWA will issue their own debt for future projects, which will get charged and paid through OCWA rates.  The fund balance will remain with the County and will be used to pay legacy costs – compensation costs, if any, retirement, etc.  OCWA will pay the difference between revenues minus expenses, and that fund balance counts as a revenue.  Chair Plochocki said that they would not be able to use the money for other projects.  Ms. Rosenthal said that these were funds raised by district rates and ad valorem.  The money will stay within the district fund and be used for district purposes deemed fit by the Legislature and OCWA as party under the agreement.

 

Mrs. Rapp said that she assumes there is not enough fund balance to pay off the tank projects for example.  Ms. Rosenthal agreed, adding that similar to Mr. Rhoads there is a need for big infrastructure investment that would have caused acceleration of rates.  They are consolidating with OCWA to blend the operations and create efficiencies.  There will still likely be costs and rate increases associated with the work that needs to be done, but it will likely be less.

 

  • 2a allows for rule language changes, last revised in the 1970’s,  change allows MWB to designate an operator – OCWA in this case
  • OCWA leasing assets, MWB and its members will continue to advise on water matters, operations, and funds in considerations of the water district

 

Chair Plochocki thanked Ms. Rosenthal for doing a phenomenal job as executive director of MWB.  Ms. Rosenthal said that MWB did some great work and thanked the committee for their support.  Chair Plochocki asked that his comments be included for the record, adding that hopefully this will not be the last time they see Ms. Rosenthal.

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Dr. Chase, to approve the change in rules (2a).  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

A motion was made by Dr. Chase, seconded by Mrs. Tassone, to approve item 2b.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT BOARD: 

        a.     Confirming Reappointments to the Onondaga County Soil and Water Conservation District Board (David H. Knapp, Derek T. Shepard, Jr.)

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Dr. Chase, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

4.     OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENT:  Travis Glazier, Director

        a.     In Connection with Deer and Tick Management:  Amending the 2016 County Budget, and Authorizing the Execution of an Agreement with the Village of Fayetteville ($100,000) (Sponsored by Mr. McMahon)

 

Mr. Glazier:

  • February 2016 legislature established committee to review deer and tick management plans from municipalities, placed $100,000 in contingency to fund resolution or action items to care for these issues
  • Village of Fayetteville requesting $14,293.33, funds to be used as partical payment to the USDA for services performed
  • Committee comprised of Chair David Skeval from Cornell Cooperative Extension, Legislators Knapp and Liedka, Mr. Maroun and himself, committee approved funding baring SEQRA questions – resolved by law, needed documentation; also discussed future SEQRA needs on behalf of the County for those apply for funds  

Mrs. Rapp said that they are looking for $14,000 of the $100,000 in contingency.  Mr. Glazier said that he believes the entire $100,000 was being put into a project account, and there was also approval of the $14,000 for those purposes.  Mrs. Rapp said that this needs to be made clear.  Ms. Lesniak said that if the funds aren’t moved to a project account they fall to the bottom line, therefore it has to be put into a project account and marked for deer and tick management moving forward.  The funds were placed in contingency during last year’s budget for 2016.  In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Mr. Glazier confirmed that the balance would be set aside for other projects, adding that other groups are in the process. 

 

Dr. Chase asked if Mr. Glazier attended the Meadowbrook meeting last night in regards to the deer in that area.  Mr. Glazier said that he was not aware of the meeting.  CCE does an excellent job of shepherding municipalities and citizen groups through the process of developing management plans, and his office tries to keep as apprised as possible.  This is a huge issue and there are a lot of meetings.  Dewitt has been doing this for some time so their group is far along.   Fayetteville Village government is heavily involved in this and their trustees and mayor took action based on their committees and plan recommendation.  Dr. Chase said the Meadowbrook is a big piece of the city, and the meeting came out of the blue.  Mr. Glazier said that sometimes these things sneak up on him and he welcomes anyone to bring them to his attention.  He keeps in close contact with CCE and recommends that these groups bring them in because they are very familiar with the process and can bring in people from the DEC and USDA.

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mrs. Tassone, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

Chair Plochocki said that this was the end of an era, and Legislator. Rapp’s last meeting.  In answer to Chair Plochocki, Mrs. Rapp confirmed that she had been vice chair of the Environmental Protection Committee, the only committee she didn’t chaired.  Chair Plochocki thanked her for her role in this committee and the legislature in general, noting that she has been a great friend and mentor, and he appreciates all that she has done.  The committee gave a round of applause. 

 

The meeting adjourned 10: 25 A.M.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Katherine French

KATHERINE M. FRENCH, Deputy Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

Attendance

 

 

* * *

 

COUNTY FACILITIES COMMITTEE MINUTES – DECEMBER 14, 2016

JUDITH A. TASSONE, CHAIR

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Dougherty, Mrs. Rapp, Dr. Chase

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Shepard

ALSO ATTENDING:  see attached list

 

Chair Tassone called the meeting to order at 10:32 a.mA motion was made by Dr. Chase, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to waive the reading of the minutes of the previous committee meeting.  A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve the minutes of the proceedings of the previous committee meeting; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     ONONDAGA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT:  Ms. Primo, Deputy County Executive Physical Services; Bob DeMore, Director of Community Development

        a.     Confirming the Appointment of Robert S. DeMore as the Commissioner of the Onondaga County Department of Facilities Management

 

Ms. Primo:

  • Appointing Bob DeMore as Commissioner of Facilities; most of committee served with Bob in the Legislature; role of Director of Community Development last 5 years; served community for over 30 years
  • Skilled attorney; involved in different types of development projects as Town Supervisor of Fabius for 13 years; County Executive well aware of skills and experience; confident Mr. DeMore will do terrific job

Mr. DeMore stated he has owned rental properties for thirty years.  Mr. DeMore was at the jail yesterday, and toured the restricted holding area on the top floor.  Mr. DeMore said he can handle the job, and Chair Tassone does not doubt that.  Mr. Dougherty commented it is a no brainer, and Mr. DeMore did a great job in Community Development.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item.

 

Mrs. Rapp asked who else was interviewed for this job.  Ms. Primo responded that she does not know of anyone else.  Mrs. Rapp stated her position is the same, and would like to see a search done for these major positions. 

 

Dr. Chase seconded the motion.  Ayes:  3 (Tassone, Dougherty, Chase)  Abstentions:  1 (Rapp); MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Transfer from Facilities Management, Account 666500 Contingency, to Facilities Management, Account 674600 Provision for Capital Projects, $200,000 ($200,000)

 

Mr. Wixson:

  • Asking for approval to transfer $200,000 from contingency to provisions for capital; specific project to use funds for
  • While investigating design and replacement of roof in Civic Center tower, encountered deterioration of brick veneer of mechanical penthouse; did not consider previously; uncovered brick veneer buckling
  • Something to take care of before replacing roof; would not want to do substantial masonry work after
  • Allowing moisture and water to infiltrate penthouse; noticed it is in adjoining wall of IT department (valuable equipment)
  • Makes best sense to do before roof; major masonry would damage roof; planning for the spring
  • Out of account 66500, 592 Capital Account - downtown various capital improvement projects; 5th adjustment to account

Mrs. Rapp asked why the money is in contingency.  Mr. Wixson responded that Facilities asked for cash on hand, and it was put into a contingency.  Chair Tassone noted it was for emergencies.  Mrs. Rapp stated it was so Facilities would come back and let the Legislature know what it was for.  Mr. Wixson agreed.

 

Dr. Chase asked if it would be enough.  Mr. Wixson replied they have a firm bid, and this would be about $26,000 short.  Facilities will find those funds elsewhere.  Firm bid is $228,000. 

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Dr. Chase, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

2.     ONONDAGA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY:  Susan Mitchell, Executive Director

        a.     Transfer from Onondaga County Public Library, Account 641010 Regular Salaries, to Onondaga County Public Library, Account 694080 Professional Services, $20,000 ($20,000)

 

  • Move $20,000 from salaries (101) to professional services to cover Syracuse City Police added to Mundy branch roster; issues over there; police more well positioned to deal with vs. security guards
  • Police can go to visit houses; know who the kids are; can talk to family about issues; tamped down issues from fall
  • Group of 10-12 kids coming in regularly and flooding library; running around, grabbing things; staff asked them to leave or follow library rules, kids grabbed branch manager by lanyard; felt needed to go to additional City Police
  • Extended Police schedule from after school to closing; make sure they’re there earlier in the day; adding additional hours, and reduced security guard hours
  • Helps, but has to be sustained effort; not stopped; bar people for a period of time, when time is up, they come back
  • Library is public place; people know what they can do; no entrance in Galleries, because problematic people know the library can only throw them as far as threshold; putting them into Gallery common space with security guards
  • Fantastic staff at Mundy branch; not one person asked to be transferred; important remains safe place
  • Mundy Branch received Community Development Block Grant from City to hire 4 teenagers from neighborhood to receive intensive technology training; teens now run after school and Saturday clubs for other kids, teaching them how to use mobile maker labs (robotics, engineering, encoding); week ago did workshop with about 70 kids
  • Approached City about grant, could see increase in bad behavior; wanted positive behavior and reward for that; program includes school lunches in summer with 150 kids/day
  • Hopefully those kids will put pressure on the ones that are acting out to behave; taking many pronged approach; want to show staff that the library is supporting them; create safe environment
  • Central Library will always have some commotion, but cut down on it by putting public restrooms right by door
  • Security is okay, and there’s enough of presence of staff; continues to be safe environment
  • Do not feel need for something more there as issues are more medical with people overdosing in restrooms or library
  • Same issues expect in public spaces downtown; do not want to exclude people with drug issues, because some need access to resources to sign up for programs, access computers to find drug rehab program
  • Less concerns from staff with parking, etc.; every year’s budget proposal has additional hours from city police and security; library only a good resource if people feel it’s a safe place they can come too
  • Mundy received $225,000 gift to install children’s area including factory, grocery store and baby area; given by anonymous donor who lives in Strathmore and Mundy is their branch
  • Money encumbered for 2016; hours already worked, putting money back in
  • Coming up with new plan; additional $60,000 in staff cuts; lost 6 full time positions

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Dr. Chase, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     Memorializing the New York State Governor, the New York State Legislature, and the New York State Thruway Authority to Take Action to Eliminate Thruway Tolls for Onondaga County Residents Traveling on the Thruway at any Points Between and Including Thruway Exit 34a and Exit 39 (Sponsored by Mr. Dougherty)

 

Mr. Dougherty:

  • Syracuse one of only cities along NYS Thruway where Thruway bisects major urban area and Town of Salina; people driving Thruway between exits 39 - 34A, should drive through toll free
  • People making trip in either direction are trying to avoid tolls driving down Taft Rd., 298, through the village, etc; causing traffic and stress on those streets; easier to get on and off Thruway; especially morning commutes
  • Ask Governor and Thruway Authority to approve; exits 38 and 37 were toll free before (Electronics Pkwy and Rt. 57)

 

Dr. Chase stated the areas around Albany are toll free, and Mr. Dougherty said Buffalo as well.  Those are the two other cities that the Thruway cuts into.  Dr. Chase said it would be great to keep traffic off the small roads, and also with whatever will happen with Route 81.  Mr. Dougherty stated the 81 project will leave this area without 81 for a while, so there will be a lot of extra traffic on 481 and 690.  This will make the traffic much worse, so the Legislature needs to think ahead.  Mr. Dougherty would like consideration on this. 

 

Mrs. Rapp commented there was a big movement for this in the 90’s, and Mr. DeFrancisco came up with the one mile bypass to not go through the village.  Chair Tassone stated maybe with the 81 project, it will be considered. 

 

Mr. Dougherty said the tolls currently are reasonably cheap ($.15 - $.35), and the people being diverted are not people stimulating business.  These are local residents.  Mrs. Rapp commented that an objection was stopping at tolls, but with EZPass, it is faster.  Mr. Dougherty said it can be zero on the toll card, which will not be a big hurdle.  The biggest hurdle will be the cost.  Dr. Chase asked if anyone figured out what the cost might be, and Mr. Dougherty responded no, but he’s certain they could.  Dr. Chase said they should definitely encourage this. 

 

A motion was made by Mr. Dougherty, seconded by Mrs. Rapp, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:50 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Signature

JAMIE McNAMARA, Assistant Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

 

Attendance

 

* * *

HEALTH COMMITTEE MINUTES - DECEMBER 15, 2016

DANNY J. LIEDKA, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mrs. Rapp, Mr. Holmquist, *Ms. Williams

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Burtis

ALSO PRESENT:  Mr. Jordan, Mr. Ryan; see attached list

 

Chairman Liedka called the meeting to order at 9:42 a.m.  A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mr. Holmquist to waive the reading and approve the minutes of the previous committee meeting; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     HEALTH DEPARTMENT:  Michelle Mignano, Deputy Commissioner

        a.     Create R.P. 01 404300 2187 Program Coordinator, Grade 13 @ $65,459 - $72,491 effective January 7, 2017

Abolish R.P. 01 404300 1822 Program Coordinator Grade 14 @ $72,396 - $80,199 effective January 7, 2017

Abolish R.P. 01 404300 6848 Program Coordinator Grade 14 @ $72,396 - $80,199 effective January 7, 2017

Abolish (1) Education Specialist Handicapped Children, Grade 11 @ $55,496 - $61,421, effective January 7, 2017, where such is intended to be one of the two positions created on November 7, 2016, by Resolution No. 185-2016.

 

  • Special Children’s Services – 2 Program Coordinators (Early Intervention (EI) and Preschool); State taking over EI, including contracting w/agencies (~2012), only fiscal, but now doing most everything; County will still do referrals
  • County still pays a bill, which goes into escrow account
  • Proposing 1 Program Coordinator for both programs; currently positions are grade 14, which does not fit anymore; proposing to make single grade 13; new person as both current coordinators are retiring
  • In November, sought Program Coordinator and Education Specialist; 2 Education Specialists were created; want to cleanup roster and get rid of extra one; this one create will accomplish what was wanted in November

Ms. Mignano responded to Chairman Liedka that they will be going down positions, but not with the ones here (i.e. Typist out of budget).  The dollar savings will be $44,000.

 

*Ms. Williams arrived at the meeting.

 

Ms. Mignano:

  • Utilizing Nursing Supervisor to do all intakes for home visiting; 3,000 referrals every year; EI gets 1,400 referrals; Public Health Nursing Supervisor to take on EI referrals

Mrs. Rapp asked if the population continues to grow.  Ms. Mignano replied it is relatively flat, and the EI count has gone up.  Ms. Serrao commented that EI’s count has gone up the last three years.  Preschool is down a little, but overall flat.  Ms. Mignano said natural referrals will come up as long as the community identifies kids that have needs to be successful in school.  Dr. Gupta commented there is more awareness and recognition, so there is intervention at the early stages.  This allows kids to become more adept, and they will not fall through the cracks.  It will be a good investment in the long run.  Mrs. Rapp thought there would exponential growth with the explosion of Autism.  Ms. Serrao stated Pediatricians are referring more kids to the program to evaluate.  The department is seeing more referrals, but not all will pan out for services. 

 

 

1

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mr. Holmquist, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

2.     ONONDAGA COUNTY COMMUNITY SERVICES ADVISORY BOARD:

        a.     Confirming Reappointments to the Onondaga County Community Services Advisory Board (Elizabeth Nolan, LMSW; Sarah Merrick)

 

A motion was made by Ms. Williams, seconded by Mrs. Rapp, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     Memorializing Support for the Enactment of Legislation to Require the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services to Establish a Firefighters Cancer Registry (S. 2799/ H.R. 4625) (Sponsored by Mr. Ryan)

 

Mr. Ryan:

  • Memorializing legislation – House bill currently cosponsored by Katko; Senate bill sponsored by Senator Schumer
  • Good friend (Mike Valenti) is a City firefighter, President of Firefighter Cancer Foundation and VP of North Eastern Region - Cancer Foundation raising money, awareness and trying to pass legislation
  • Firefighters across country developing cancer at alarming rate for different reasons – i.e.  air breathing in when going into burning buildings
  • Statistic:  ~64% of retirees or current firefighters are developing cancer; both professional and volunteer
  • Legislation will get arms around issue; develop database; do cancer screening process before, during and after leaving the job; see if no one has cancer when coming in, versus 10 years later 50% have cancer; get to root of problem
  • Registry does not have names attached; NY or CNY would list 41 year old male who developed cancer
  • Get data and find out:  What is causing it?  What geographic regions?  How many are out there?  What is the actual rate?  When they leave, are they developing cancer?  Trying to find way to get more information on this problem

Chairman Liedka said it is a memorializing resolution with bipartisan support with the US government.  Mrs. Rapp asked if it is just creating the registry, and Mr. Ryan agree.  Mr. Ryan stated the registry is completely voluntary, and Mike Valenti is available for any questions. 

 

Chairman Liedka asked if anyone outside of the City is aware of this, and are they supportive.  Mr. Ryan responded yes.  Mike (Valenti) came out of the Manlius Fire Department (Volunteer), and still works out there part time.  This is a tight nit community, and they are watching their peers develop cancer. 

 

Mrs. Rapp asked what they are doing after the data is collected, and Mr. Ryan replied it will be utilized to find out the numbers, what types of cancers, how is it happening, what’s causing it, and why is it such a problem.

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Ms. Williams, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

Chairman Liedka encouraged the members to reach out to the fire departments in their district, and he will contact the volunteer association to let them know what the Legislature is doing.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:01 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Signature

JAMIE M. McNAMARA, Assistant Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

Attendance

* * *

PLANNING & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE MINUTES

DECEMBER 15, 2016

KATHLEEN A. RAPP, CHAIR

* * *

WAYS & MEANS COMMITTEE MINUTES - DECEMBER 16, 2016

David Knapp, Chairman

 

 
 
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