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Meeting Minutes July 2010 Return to Committee Meeting Minutes
Office of the Onondaga County Legislature
Court House, Room 407 * 401 Montgomery Street * Syracuse, New York 13202
(315) 435-2070 Fax: (315) 435-8434
DEBORAH L. MATURO
Clerk
JAMES M. RHINEHART
Chairman
JOHANNA H. ROBB
Deputy Clerk

 

PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE MINUTES – JULY 13, 2010

CHAIRMAN PATRICK KILMARTIN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Meyer, Mr. Dougherty, Ms. Williams, *Mr. Masterpole

ALSO PRESENT:  Mr. Rhinehart see also attached list

 

The Chairman called the meeting to order at 9:05 a.m.  A motion was made by Mr. Meyer, seconded by Ms. Williams to waive the reading and approve the minutes of the proceedings of the previous committee meeting.  MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     FIRE ADVISORY BOARD:  Peter Alberti, Commissioner, Emergency Management

        a.     Confirming Appointment/Reappointments to Onondaga County Fire Advisory Board (Norman G. Carroll, Jr., Keith Ducett, Jr., Emanuele J. Falcone, Dan Ford, Melissa Mott, Christopher J. Naum)

 

A motion was made by Mr. Meyer, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

2.     EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT:  Peter Alberti, Commissioner

        a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept Homeland Security Funds From the State Homeland Security Grant Program for the Onondaga County Department of Emergency Management, and Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into Contracts to Implement this Resolution ($751,269)

 

  • Federal funds passed through the state
  • **NYS retains 20% of the funds - $751,269 net balance to Onondaga County
  • Funds must be expensed and services completed by May 31, 2012
  • $100,000 contribution to the city for the hazmat vehicle used for response in the entire Central NYS Syracuse Region
  • $140,000 in funding for current County Emergency Management Personnel

 

*Mr. Masterpole arrived at the meeting.

 

**The county has been notified that NYS is returning the 20% withheld from the 2008 grant funds; possibility for the same return on this grant.

 

In response to Mr. Meyer, Mr. Alberti stated we are in the process of an Intermunicipal Agreement with the city.  The city will purchase the hazmat vehicle.  The county will reimburse the city $100,000 from this grant fund.  The total cost of the vehicle is $700,000.  A resolution will be coming forth for the transfer of funds.

 

In response to Chairman Kilmartin, Mr. Alberti stated there are hazardous material incidents at different levels everyday.  There about 200 per year in the city of Syracuse, less in the county.  Most of the incidents can be handled by the spiller.  The city currently has two hazmat response vehicles (a small and large).  The new vehicle is slightly larger in order to accommodate the materials required for regional coverage.

 

In response to Mr. Dougherty, Mr. Alberti stated that two weeks ago the large hazmat vehicle was called to the Butternut Creek area for a large propane tank leak.  The city of Syracuse assisted the town of Dewitt Fire Department in repairing the leak.

 

In response to Mr. Rhinehart, Mr. Alberti stated Onondaga County does not have a hazmat vehicle; they utilize vehicles from local fire departments for hazmat response.  The county has some pickup trucks and a few decontaminate trailers.  They provide equipment and training for the fire departments and fire departments provide the vehicle.  Under this format the city hazmat team will respond to any hazmat incident in the county.  The county will not be charged for the coverage.  The city will provide the services as part of this agreement to the five counties in the central region.  In addition, the law states the spiller is responsible for the cost incurred for any incident.  The local fire department teams and county hazardous material team remain in place to cover smaller incidents.  They will be part of the large regional team when necessary.

 

In response to Mr. Meyer, Mr. Alberti stated when there is a hazardous materials incident the initial evaluation is conducted by the local fire chief.   The Chief may call the Hazardous Material Coordinator for technical assistance and/or to determine if expanded coverage is necessary.

 

Chairman Kilmartin questioned the number of city and county employees that are dedicated to the hazmat team.

  • All fire fighters must have a basic level of hazardous material training
  • Syracuse Fire Station No. 5 - Geddes Street has 8 to 12 Hazardous Material Specialists per shift  
  • Onondaga County has a trained Terror Response Team consisting of 40 volunteer fire fighters within five core departments

 

Mr. Alberti stated that he believes when the county hazmat team is called out they are acting as agents of Onondaga County.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Meyer, seconded by Chairman Kilmartin to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS:  William Bleyle, Commissioner

        a.     Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into Agreements for a Tactical Interoperable Communications Plan (TICP) Through the Central New York Interoperable Communications Consortium (CNYICC)

 
  • Plan does not commit any dollar resources
  • Formalizes the current sharing plan
  • Provides for oversight structure
  • Identifies the communication resources within the five county region
  • Provides contact information and structure for communication resources
  • Cost of employee travel to regional (adjoining county) meetings is the only budget ramification 
  • Plan will ensure eligibility to receive Homeland Security communications funding
  • Provide a formal coordinated regional interoperability planning and resource sharing effort
  • Plan is a boiler plate template provided from Homeland Security with minor county modifications

 

Mr. Dougherty questioned the language in the second paragraph of the resolution pertaining to the canceled Statewide Wireless Network. “Whereas, the CNYICC was formed for the purpose of fostering collaborations on a joint interoperable communications network that could serve all first responders in the five county region as well as interfacing with the Statewide Wireless Network and other public service agencies and would study and establish a process for sharing costs and assets that would be of mutual benefit to all parties; and”.  Mr. Bleyle stated there is still discussion of some type of statewide network.  Broadband is being considered as well as what we are doing here in Onondaga County.  Mr. Dougherty requested that the Statewide Wireless Network wording be removed from the resolution as the network does not exist at this time. 

 

Mr. Kilmartin proposed that the paragraph be amended to read,Whereas, the CNYICC was formed for the purpose of fostering collaborations on a joint interoperable communications network that could serve all first responders in the five county region as well as interfacing with other local regional state and federal public service agencies and would study and establish a process for sharing costs and assets that would be of mutual benefit to all parties; and”.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Meyer, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item as amended.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:43 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Katherine M. French

Assistant Clerk

* * *

HEALTH COMMITTEE MINUTES, JULY 13, 2010

ROBERT D. WARNER, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Laguzza, Mr. Meyer, Mr. Holmquist, Mrs. Ervin

ALSO PRESENT:  see attached list (Attachment 1)

 

Chairman Warner called the meeting to order at 10:03 a.m.  A motion was made by Mr. Meyer, seconded by Mrs. Ervin to waive the reading of the minutes and approve the minutes of the proceedings of the previous committee meeting; MOTION CARRIED.

 

Welcome and brief summary of conversation with Community General Hospital – Dr. David Smith, President, Upstate Medical University

Dr. Smith congratulated the Legislators on passing the local law prohibiting smoking within 100 feet of the perimeter of property operating as a general hospital.  It has made a difference, their own commissioned peace officers and others have found it easy to work with and they have found incredible compliance.  Dr. Smith provided a map of the Upstate Medical University buildings (on file with Clerk) and noted the following:

  • East Tower of Upstate Medical University:  $150 million expansion to University Hospital, no state dollars in this facility, entirely bonded. 
  • Total budget for Upstate Medical University is $1.15 billion, 8,000 employees (added 442 employees this year).  State funding is only about 10.1% of their entire budget.
  • Hospital side:  Trauma center for 17 counties from Canada into Pennsylvania; burn center for 32 counties, poison control center for 34 counties, telepsychiatry for 38 counties.  Budget is a little over $600 million; only 6.2% of the budget comes from the State of New York.
  • They are a private university with a public mission regulated like a state agency.
  • Mission:  teaching, research and service – it is a university with a hospital attached.  They have a campus in Binghamton, opened a set of classrooms at Jefferson Community College in Watertown and have affiliations throughout the region.
  • Vision:  to be the finest regional academic health center in the country.  They need a larger footprint to do that (now landlocked).
  • Noted the addition of Kennedy Square where they are building a biotech center ($22 million), taking possession of Townsend and Harrison Towers this week.  Towers will be renovated for student/resident housing ($16-17 million).
  • Multi-dimensional growth - to be regionally responsive – growing enrollment (about 30%), growing research mission (19% this year), and being able to meet other degree needs such as their new nurse practitioners program and psychiatric health.  Post traumatic stress and other things at Ft. Drum are creating tremendous demand on the region.
  • Budget is driven predominantly by patient revenues, federal grants, research grants, private industry relationships, tuition which is less than 8% of their budget (a little over 1,500 students); also have about 500 medical residents.  About 75% of the doctors in this region are from Upstate Medical University, about 90% of nurses stay in three county region (almost 100% in five county region).  College of Health Professions: medical technologists, respiratory therapists, radiation therapists, perfusionists (heart/lung machine operators) – almost 89% stay within region.
  • Had to offset substantial reductions of state support (almost 16% on the university side and about 18% on hospital side) – realized 16% growth in clinical revenue this year, research goal was 10% - realized 19% this year.  They do about $40 million worth of research per year; National Science Foundation suggests for every million dollars of research, it produces 27 new jobs.

Dr. Smith noted that if they want to continue to grow and meet their mission and anticipating that there will be further state cuts next year; they will have to have capacity.  Currently, the hospital is running 95-96% occupied.  If they are going to continue to hit the mark of 5% annualized growth, they will have to have access to additional beds, also need to look at new ways to train (working with the private sector).  They have submitted a proposal regarding a partnership with Community General Hospital because of their concern about regional services and the Berger Commission requirements for Community General, Van Duyn, Auburn and Fulton.  According to their strategic plan, they need access to about 110 additional beds.  With enrollment and faculty growth, they will need approximately 540 total bed access.  Community General has about 306 licensed beds, staffs about 100 to 130 at one time.  If Upstate were to build 100 new beds, it would cost in the range of $85-$90 million and then would have to get a certificate of need.  Considering Community General’s debt, pension obligations and assets, Upstate is looking at a substantially less cost per bed and Community General has the certificate of need.  It is an area where they could do more teaching and grow and expand their Family Medicine, also have interest in looking at Acute Mental Health needs.  Upstate has a long-standing relationship with Community – has run the emergency room at Community General for several years under contract and also their rehabilitative medicine program.  They are seeing more regional requirements for their graduates and on the revenue side it makes great sense.  Concerning jobs in the area, there are 1, 0000 positions at Community General and there is 42 acres of land.  They are beginning to have some dialog with Van Duyn concerning partnering with them because of their interest in long term care and other aspects of care of an aging population.

 

Mr. Warner noted that their budget is about equal to the entire County budget.  Dr. Smith said their goal is not to go in a disrupt a lot of things, they are primarily here as a university, what drives their mission is education and research, would create more synergy than anxiety and should stabilize all the entities.

 

1.     VAN DUYN:  Roberta Sprague, Commissioner, Ms. Maureen Cerniglia, Deputy Commissioner

        a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept Funds to Allow Van Duyn Home and Hospital to Implement a Contract with Select Rehabilitation to Provide Van Duyn Residents with Therapeutic Services ($650,000)

Select Rehabilitation will provide occupational, physical and speech therapy at Van Duyn Home and Hospital, contract was signed June 30th.  Select has started meeting with the Van Duyn therapists to offer them positions.  Van Duyn will bill Medicare Parts A and B based on the number of minutes Select provides to Van Duyn residents; Van Duyn has to pay Select within 45 days after each month’s billing.  With projected numbers, they should realize a profit of about $1.5 million per year.  Regarding the $650,000 for appropriation, have taken amounts they will be billing for Part A and B and have spread that over the next four months for this year’s budget.

 

In answer to Mr. Meyer, Ms. Sprague said Select has offered therapists jobs with sizable pay increases, three people have signed on so far, three people have expressed an interest in taking the retirement incentive, others are still in the decision making process.  Mr. Meyer asked about adjustments to lines in their budget.  Ms. Sprague said they are looking at the 101 Line where salaries are for the therapists.  In the 408 Line, Van Duyn has had a contract with a company that provided speech therapy ($36,000 per year); they will no longer have to pay that.  There is an agreement with the union concerning contracting this out; by 2012 there will be a certain number of people who will have to leave employment with the County.  Those who have been with Van Duyn the longest could stay until 2014 (3 are possibly accepting the retirement incentive), 4 who would be allowed to stay on until 2012 and then would be off the payroll, and another 3 will be transitioned out by 2012.  They will also be saving on the fringe benefits.  Mr. Meyer asked about the downside.  Ms. Sprague said the only downside would be if the company was totally wrong with their projections of billing that were based on the national averages.  Ms. Sprague said therapy will be available six days a week and they would do a seventh day if needed (currently it is 5 days).  Contract is good for one year with four one-year renewals. 

 

Mr. Warner asked who would oversee them.  Ms. Cerniglia said they are a national corporation based out of Chicago, therapists are licensed and everything they do is determined by a physician’s order.

 

In answer to Mr. Laguzza Ms. Sprague said if Van Duyn doesn’t pay within the 45 days of billing and after a 60-day grace period to work things out, the company has permission to pull out of the contract.

 

In answer to Mrs. Ervin, Mrs. Sprague said the staff is being treated fairly, an issue for some is that they won’t get all the paid holidays they had in past.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Warner, seconded by Mr. Holmquist to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:43 a.m.

 

Ms. Leola Rodgers, Associate Administrator, gave the committee members a tour of Golisano Children’s Hospital.

 

Respectfully submitted,

  

Johanna H. Robb

Deputy Clerk

 

* * *

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION COMMITTEE MINUTES, JULY 14, 2010

JAMES A. CORBETT, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mrs. Rapp, *Mrs. Tassone, Mr. Buckel, Mrs. Ervin

ALSO PRESENT:  Mr. Rhinehart and see attached list (Attachment 1)

 

Chairman Corbett called the meeting to order at 10:00 a.m.  A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mrs. Tassone to waive the reading of the minutes and to approve the minutes of the proceedings of the previous committee meeting; MOTIONS CARRIED.  

 

Chairman Corbett took the agenda out of order.

 

4.     Requesting the Onondaga County Commissioner of Water Environment Protection to Work with the Residents of Whispering Oaks and the Town of Lysander to Resolve Wastewater Collection Issues at Whispering Oaks (Sponsored by Mr. Lesniak)

Mr. Lesniak provided a handout entitled “Whispering Oaks Cost Impact Analysis” compiled in 2009 (on file with Clerk).

Report on progress is requested within thirty (30) days after the adoption of this resolution.  The town has been issued a consent order from DEC, have to determine which way to resolve this issue:

  • Currently, Whispering Oaks has a community septic system, it has failed for at least the last five years
  • 44 single family homes
  • Option 1:  hookup across the river into Harbor Heights Pump Station would be the cheapest route; the town and residents are willing to do this – a separate hookup just for Whispering Oaks, estimated cost - $924,000.
  • Option 2:  going down Rt. 370, estimated cost - $1,806,000 – Force Main to West Genesee St. Sewer District 18” Trunk sewer, could ultimately result in other hookups.

A handout was provided entitled “Town of Lysander, Whispering Oaks Sewer District Summary of Public Sewer Alternatives Considered for Absorption Bed Replacement” (on file with Clerk).  Ms. Smiley explained the complicated issue:

  • A community septic system was approved by the Health Department years ago when the land was developed, developer went bankrupt and it ended up in the town’s lap.
  • As part of the 20/10 plan, development along Rt. 370 was supposed to happen with a sewer connection along 370, 250 units are slated for development.
  • The determination was made to use a community septic system instead of connection at the time Whispering Oaks was developed. 
  • The County’s position on this is to not make another bad decision by going across the river.  Issues regarding going across the river:
  • Potential impacts on Town of Van Buren’s future development.
  • There will be a need for connection for future development of Rt. 370; it would be hard to say that they cannot connect across the river, which would further impact the County’s facilities on that side (not built or sized for that type of growth).

Ms. Smiley said there is more water going through the community septic system than should be according to the design plan; the County needs access to the homes to find out if there are illegal connections or other things causing the septic system to fail.  County has only been able to work with ten home owners since the town sent a letter to residents last January, but needs to assess all properties.  County needs the town to cooperate; County has done video checking for the town, assisted in writing a grant, pushed them to get in line for additional funding.

 

Mr. Lesniak said a new letter has gone out from the town to the residents with a copy of the consent order.  Ms. Smiley said they have not received any calls.  Regarding the proposed development along Rt. 370, Mr. Lesniak said a lot of developers have backed away because there is so much wet land, it wouldn’t be developed for years. 

 

Ms. Smiley said the cost of going across the Seneca River is $24,000 per unit served; the cost of going down Rt. 370 based on the potential units reported by the town, is about $5,900 per unit; there is capacity with connect to the pipe, there isn’t going across the river; there are no easements as of yet to go across river, need DEC’s permission.  Ms. Pastella said the cost per unit also includes connection of the existing houses along Rt. 370.  Ms. Smiley noted that even if the home owners decide to go across the river, the County is not going to do it with the volumes that shouldn’t be happening.  Ms. Pastella said there are concerns with going across the river and connecting into the two pump stations that sewage would flow into; they would have to do odor control, there is potential for over- generation, pump stations are 50 to 70 feet from houses, pump stations would need to be upgraded at an additional $305,500.  At the first meeting with the town, Mr. Lesniak said the residents chose going across the river even though they could potentially try to fix the community septic system for a lesser amount.

 

Mrs. Rapp asked what the consent order says.  Mr. Lesniak said it tells the town they have to do this within a year and six months or face penalties, consent order fines will come out of that sewer district, it is to their advantage to comply.

 

There was discussion concerning amending the resolution to strike the first and second Resolved Clauses and to insert the following final Resolved Clause:  “Resolved, that this Legislature hereby requests the Town of Lysander to work with the residents of Whispering Oaks and the Commissioner of Water Environment Protection to arrive at a reasonable and suitable solution to this problem and to grant any permissions needed so as to enable those residents to be connected to the sewer system as quickly as possible”.  Mr. Corbett recommended striking the first Resolved Clause and leaving the final Resolved Clause in the resolution along with the amended Resolved Clause.

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp seconded by Mrs. Tassone to approve this item as amended; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     LAKE IMPROVEMENT:  Patricia Pastella, Commissioner

        a.     ACJ Update

  • “Save the Rain” Campaign Education and Outreach – announcements in Weeder’s Digest, Post-Standard and on YNN; participated in the Jazzfest and Taste of Syracuse.
  • Presentations on the County’s Green Infrastructure program at Center of Excellence, Henniger High School, Dr. King Middle School Career Fair and Oswego County Legislature
  • Pilot rain barrel program – have distributed about 70 barrels on the south and west sides of the City
  • Completed first “green” parking lot – Lot #23, formerly the Downtown Farmer’s Market lot
  • Skimmer boat operation has been operating twice per week since June
  • Harbor Brook Interceptor Replacement project is ongoing, scheduled to be complete by the end of 2010, with final restoration in the spring of 2011
  • Midland Phase III – kickoff meeting for the facilities plan on June 10, construction of CSO 044 will commence this summer
  • Clinton CSO Abatement – kickoff meeting for the facilities plan on June 10 – have started final design for a large storage facility in the Trolley Lot.
  • Harbor Brook CSO Abatement – In preliminary design for a large storage facility which will be located near State Fair Blvd.
  • Ambient Monitoring Program is in full swing for summer – doing a lot of work on the lake with sampling, netting of fish for mercury, program will continue through July.

2.     OCWA:

        a.     Confirming Appointment of John Bianchini to the Onondaga County Water Authority Board - James M. Rhinehart, Chairman

Mr. Rhinehart noted that Mr. Bianchini has a finance background, is very open minded, a long-time resident of the County and came highly recommended by Mr. Stanczyk.

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mr. Corbett to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     WEP:

        a.     Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into a Contract with the United States of America, Department of the Interior, for the Operation and Maintenance of Stream Gauging Stations in the County of Onondaga ($74,240)

There are ten in-stream stations and one lake station; total cost - $123,700, balance picked up by Dept. of Interior.

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mrs. Ervin to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Appropriating $8,383,140 of the Proceeds of the Bonds Authorized to be Issued Pursuant to Bond Resolution No. 231, dated September 7, 1999, to Provide Funds for Engineering, Construction and Other Related Expenses of the Clinton Street Conveyances and Regional Treatment Facility Project ($8,383,140)

Final piece of the project, contract for design is in place, do not have contract for construction at this time.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Buckel, seconded by Mrs. Tassone to approve this item, passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        c.     Authorizing the County of Onondaga to Enter into a Memorandum of Understanding with the City of Syracuse to Share in Funding of Development and/or Use of a Stormwater Run-Off Model ($80,000)

This would be a master model of the County and City properties that drain into the City of Syracuse.  Model will provide a management tool – will say what the storm water peeks are, will help them to mitigate the CSOs and will allow for dispersed green approach to storm water management through new development.  A report will delineate and map watersheds, summarize hydrologic and hydraulic modeling results, determine how peak stormwater flows influence CSOs, and recommend stormwater management policies.

 

Mr. Rhinehart asked if there is already a plan as part of the ACJ.  Ms. Pastella said on a CSO basis, they have green in specific areas, that green isn’t based on how much stormwater is generated in the area.  They know which CSOs are more active, but they don’t have a plan regarding where that stormwater comes from and how to divert or handle it upstream.  Ms. Smiley noted that once the model is developed it can be utilized and replicated in other areas of new development.  This current model would be used within the City and a three mile limit of the city border.

A motion was made by Mrs. Ervin, seconded by Mr. Buckel to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        d.     Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into an Agreement with the City of Syracuse to Share in the Costs of Funding an Arborist to be Employed by the City ($37,500)

* Mrs. Tassone left the room.

County would pay 50% of the cost of salary and benefits (not to exceed $35,000 per year) for a full time position for the period of five years.  It is vital position for the County’s “Save the Rain” program for capture of the stormwater, arborist will be instrumental in managing the tree inventory, recommending tree species, how they should be pruned, etc.  Arborist could be used by other county departments as well; they would pay their share of the cost.

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mr. Buckel to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        e.     Authorizing the County of Onondaga to Enter into Amendment No. 2 to the 2007 IMA, as Amended, with the City of Syracuse to Revise the Easements Granted by the City to the County for the Harbor Brook Interceptor System Improvement Project

Revised easement is needed for a rerouting of a section of the interceptor sewer which will go through the athletic fields at Fowler High School, includes removal of bleachers and press box.

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mrs. Ervin to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        f.     Authorizing and Ratifying the County of Onondaga to Act as Lead Agency Under the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA), Determining the Classification of an Unlisted Action Under SEQRA, Accepting the Environmental Assessment Form Prepared for the Sewer Use Capacity Management, Operation and Maintenance and Related Functions Local Law Adopting a Negative Declaration and Authorizing the Publication, Circulation, Service and Filing of the Environmental Assessment Form, the Negative Declaration and Determination and Findings for the Sewer Use Capacity Management, Operation and Maintenance and Related Functions Local Law

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mrs. Ervin to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        g.     A Local Law Establishing a Program to Promote Capacity Management, Maintenance and Operation of the Public Sewers and Related Purposes, and to Repeal Local Law No. 13 of 1989

Mr. Mendez said the local law has been revised to reflect comments from small working group committees, informational sessions, meetings with the towns, villages and City and also the Home Builders and Remodelers Association.  Ms. Smiley and Mr. Millea provided a handout regarding revisions to the local law (on file with Clerk).  Mr. Mendez reviewed the following:

  • Section 19:  Made it as clear as they could without gutting the local law’s enforcement provisions that it is not the intention of the County to use a connection moratorium as means of implementing this local law, but also to recognize that it is something the State might order the County or a municipality within the County to do if there are capacity problems with respect to wastewater that are not being addressed and then result in sanitary sewer overflows, basement backups and other problems.  It is an easy sanction for the State, often the result is to take the easiest, most costly way out – build another pipe, increase the size of a pump station, because it is faster than going through and studying the whole system and getting the flow and filtration out in other ways.
  • The law remains focused on developing and implementing strategies that try to address wet weather capacity issues by focusing on getting out the excess stormwater flows that come into the sewer system from building foundations, footer drains, roof leaders and sump pumps that are prevalent in older construction. Make certain that construction practices stay up to date so that any new sewer that is built is tight, as free as possible for inflow and infiltration and that construction practices themselves don’t lead to excessive inflow and infiltration.
  • Major changes were done to Sections 6 – 11:
  • Did away with having both an affidavit of inspection and a certificate of inspection, it has all been combined into a certificate of inspection; those certificates will be filed with the Plumping Division of WEP.
  • Spells out what is contained in the certificate – that the house has been inspected and that it does or does not contain illegal connections. 
  • Also created a provision for a property owner to file a waiver in lieu of a certificate of inspection.  Waivers would not be permanent, would have to be reviewed periodically as conditions in the particular service area change.
  • Clarifies that there are two ways for people to comply by either filing the certificate of inspection or getting the waiver.
  • Revised law has also done away with the County Clerk’s fee.  It will require that the person doing the certification to have credentials – for example, a licensed plumber, certified inspector, professional engineer.
  • In order to build more flexibility, requirement that disconnections will be done within ten years instead of five years.

Mr. Corbett noted that what is considered illegal now was not when these homes were built.  Ms. Smiley said that even if an owner doesn’t sell their home, they need to disconnect within ten years.  Mr. Corbett said a lot of hard work went into this document with discussion with affected parties, have finally come with a document that over five, ten years should clear up a lot of the problems.  Mrs. Rapp asked how people will know about the law.  Ms. Pastella said there will be programs in the towns and villages where problems will be identified; those are the areas they will focus on.

 

In answer to Mrs. Rapp, Ms. Smiley said the meeting with the Home Builders Assoc. was very positive, they were initially concerned about the moratorium issue, wanted to make sure they were not being the scapegoat for all the problems in the community. They had some innovative ideas regarding plumbing fixtures, etc.  Mr. Mendez said one aspect they stressed was the need for towns to work with developers rather than just pass the cost along to develop.

 

Ms. Smiley noted that if they don’t get control of the stormwater, the County will be building bigger and more expensive infrastructure to handle it.

 

Mr. Buckel noted this is a significant piece of legislation to address in an innovative way a fragmented system that affects all of our taxpayers and residents.

 

The committee members decided to have special informational meeting in August to hear any persons interested in the local law.  Ms. Smiley said the Local law could be marked as “Draft” and posted on the website so that people could look at it.  The local law would then be placed on the September Session agenda.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Buckel, seconded by Mrs. Ervin to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        h.     Authorizing the County of Onondaga to Enter into an Agreement with the City of Syracuse to Provide a Grant for Funding of Green Infrastructure for the Connective Corridor and Forman Park Improvement Projects ($168,000)

Ms. Pastella said the project would result in significant volume capture by greening the Connective Corridor and Forman Park; actual green infrastructure in Forman Park - $50,000, design of green infrastructure for the Connective Corridor - $118,000 (money allocated previously for Midland, Clinton or Harbor Brook).  Ms. Smiley said after discussions with Syracuse University and the City, the County has looked at places along the Corridor where we could add green infrastructure to meet County goals.

 

Forman’s Park Reconstruction Improvement project will cost $1.5 million.  The $26 - $27 million budget for the entire Connective Corridor includes $20 million from the State ($10 million from Empire State Development Corporation, and $10 million from the Dormitory Authority), transportation funding.  Construction for the section from Waverly to Forman Park will take place in the spring.

 

In answer to Mr. Corbett, Ms. Smiley noted that as part of the ACJ, the County is required to capture 6.8% of the volume in green infrastructure.  Have to look at all opportunities – everything from streetscapes, urban forests, green roofs, parking lots; they are trying to look at development opportunities that are ongoing, such as ESF, St. Joseph’s, Upstate; it doesn’t matter where the capture happens as long as it is within those sewer sheds.  The Connective Corridor, as it is eventually built out, has significant volume issues.  Mr. Rhinehart noted that the green infrastructure should be included in this Corridor project, should be part of the requirements to develop that.  Ms. Smiley said they are working with the City right now concerning two ordinances – one is the tree and one the stormwater ordinance that the city will be making changes to; over time looking to change other ordinances.

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Ervin, seconded by Mr. Buckel to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:38 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Johanna H. Robb

Deputy Clerk

* * *

COUNTY FACILITIES COMMITTEE MINUTES - JULY 15, 2010

KATHLEEN A. RAPP, CHAIR

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Masterpole, Mr. Lesniak, Mr. Dougherty, Mrs. Tassone

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. DeMore, Mr. Kinne

ALSO PRESENT:  Mr. Rhinehart and see attached list (Attachment 1)

 

Chair Rapp called the meeting to order at 9:04 a.m.  A motion was made by Mr. Lesniak, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to waive the reading of the minutes and approve the minutes of the proceedings of the previous committee meeting; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     FACILITIES MANAGEMENT:  Brian Lynch, Commissioner

        a.     Authorizing the County of Onondaga to Enter into an Agreement with the City of Syracuse for County Processing of the City's Mail, and Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept Revenues from such Agreement

The County owns and operates high speed mail sorting and processing equipment.  City and County would enter into a five year agreement; there will be a $60,000 cost to the City for the last quarter of this year (combination of postal expenses incurred, plus a processing fee that would be charged monthly); no increased personnel costs for the County.

A motion was made by Mr. Masterpole, seconded by Mr. Lesniak to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

2.     OCPL:  Elizabeth Dailey, Executive Director

        a.     Combining Previously Authorized Capital Projects into the Onondaga County Public Library Comprehensive Branches Infrastructure Capital Project, and Amending Resolution Nos. 109 - 2007, 131 - 2007, 105 - 2008 and 117 - 2009 ($1,047,867)

This would tie together all the funds that they have received or will receive for the Comprehensive Branches Infrastructure Capital Project.  In 2009, a resolution passed to bond for a two-year project for branches, some of the funding is coming from New York State.  Ms. Tarolli said she will change the Resolved clause to say approximately $1,047,867 to the capital project account.

A motion was made by Mr. Lesniak, seconded by Mrs. Tassone to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     PARKS:  Rebecca Hann, Budget Analyst

        a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept a Grant from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into an Agreement with the City of Syracuse for Improvements to Burnet Park ($285,000)

Grant was originally a member item when Congressman Walsh was in office, decision at that time was to use grant as an enhancement to what was the field house at Burnet Park, to tie the park more closely to the Zoo as a destination type attraction.  HUD regulations say the money has to flow through the original member item – through the County and then County would contract with the City.  Mr. Driscoll, Syracuse Dir. of Parks and Recreation, said the old ice rink is currently being used for lacrosse and soccer and for some of their camps.  Based on the number of current users, they are in a good position to enhance the facility by completely enclosing it and putting down a new field surface; would have an increase in use and it will bring them to the next level regarding a destination place.

A motion was made by Mr. Masterpole, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item, passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept Funds from BOCES for the Installation of High Speed Internet at Beaver Lake Nature Center, and Authorizing the County Executive to enter into Contracts ($7,000)

It is the only park in the system that currently does not have high speed internet access, doesn’t have access to county servers.  BOCES holds a class at Beaver Lake Nature Center geared towards life sciences and has contributed $7,000; funds have also been secured through the County Technology Venture Capital Program ($13,300).

A motion was made by Mr. Lesniak, seconded by Mr. Masterpole to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED. 

Mr. Lesniak requested to be a co-sponsor of this item.

 

        c.     A Local Law Amending Local Laws Imposing the Fees Collected by the Onondaga County Department of Parks and Recreation to Provide Onondaga County Residents with Relief from the Excessive Heat

Mr. Lesniak noted that there was communication with him and Mr. Stanczyk before the County Executive’s office waived the fees, but the Legislature still has to approve this.  Mrs. Rapp explained that there were two different versions of the resolution to consider:  

  • Retroactively approve the County Executive waiving the fees for the two days (July 7 and 8)
  • To give the County Executive the ability of waiving fees up to seven days in extreme circumstances with the approval of the Chairman of the Legislature and Chairman of the County Facilities Committee (July 6 – 13)

 

Mr. Lesniak said he would need more facts before approving the second version – County Executive’s intent and criteria, fees per day that the county would lose.

 

Ms. Hann noted it was well received by the public, hours at the beaches were extended until 8:00 p.m., had all the resources in the parks to make it happen, lifeguard schedules were staggered, no additional overtime.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Lesniak seconded by Mrs. Tassone to approve the local law stating that for a two day period, commencing on July 7, 2010, and concluding on July 8, 2010, the County shall not collect fees for admission or parking at the following parks:  Jamesville Beach, Oneida Shores; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

The second local will be discussed at the next committee meeting when there is more information.

 

4.       OCC:  Dr. Debbie Sydow, President

        a.     Confirming Appointment to Onondaga Community College Board of Trustees (Melanie Littlejohn)

Ms. Littlejohn has been a valued member of the college’s Foundation Board, has been a wonderful partner to OCC on a number of special projects.

A motion was made by Mr. Masterpole, seconded by Mrs. Rapp to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Appropriating $16,900,000 of Bonds Authorized Pursuant to Resolution No. 171 - 2009 for a Construction and Reconstruction Project at Onondaga Community College and Amending the 2010 County Budget ($16,900,000)

Dr. Sydow reviewed that capital projects for community colleges, according to NYS law, require a 50% match from the local sponsor.  Project is for an addition to Ferrante Hall and renovations to the Gordon Student Center totaling $18,930,000.  Of the $9,480,000 County funds authorized, $1,015,000 was appropriated for architectural, engineering and technical services in Res. 172-2009.  Dr. Sydow introduced Mr. Harry Warren, Design Principal, Cannon Design.  Below are slides from Mr. Warren’s presentation (Complete presentation on file with Clerk):

 

1

A way to unite the campus with a building across the gorge, there would be an indoor connection from one end of the campus to the other.  Other areas they studied around Ferrante Hall are filled with new and planned underground utilities, won’t have the cost of utility relocation.

 

2

Truss would be built into the building’s architecture – subtle, unique.  Glass in front of the truss – would be all major performance spaces that are two stories high, practice rooms all look out into the gorge.  Lobby for student and public access, one central corridor, common classrooms, performance spaces, recital hall for 150 people.  Second floor will have smaller spaces – practice rooms, offices.

3

 

Regarding cost of spaces, Mr. Warren said they don’t assign a square foot cost for the entire building – office cost is different than performance space, mechanical rooms.

 

Mr. Aiello, representing OCC Board of Trustees, said they spent a significant amount of time reviewing different locations and it is their opinion that spanning the gorge is the most efficient way.  They would be eliminating a significant amount of foundation work, and costs regarding utility relocation.  It affords the least amount of impact and it is the best value.  Costs per square foot are not excessive, fall in line with many Class A office spaces around the county.  Board is continuing to be actively involved; college is using all its efforts and expertise to bring this project in, at or below budget.

 

Mr. Lesniak asked about the professional services - $1,122,500.  Mr. Warren said that is architectural services, engineering services, specialty programming, acoustic consultant work for the performance space, testing, etc.  Dr. Sydow said that amount is part of what was already appropriated.  Mr. Lesniak noted that the project contingency seems low.  Mr. Warren said they have pretty definitive plans, programs, details, engineering concepts; it is tight, but they feel comfortable with those numbers.

 

Dr. Sydow explained that the County share of the $16,900,000 would be about $8.4 million.  State funds are secure, voted on by the state legislature in 2008.  Ms. Tarolli advised that the state funds will be in the next state bond call.  Regarding County bonding, Mr. Rowley said they have included approximately $470,000 that they get from college charge-backs (students from other counties at OCC) towards this debt service.  Mr. Rowley said the bonding is well within the County policy relative to debt level.  Regarding discussion about whether the County can afford this, Dr. Sydow said they are absolutely solid in their enrollment growth, and have plans for continued growth going forward; College is experiencing space restraints, there are 8 general purpose classrooms in this space.  Project will go to bid late fall 2010; will begin construction right after bid period (18 month project.)  Students will be able to use the Gordon Student Center and Ferrante Hall while under construction.

 

In answer to Mr. Masterpole, Dr. Sydow said the music program is one of the college’s signature programs; they have had more than a doubling of applications for the program in the last five years.  The program is very well respected not only in New York State but in the northeast, have students from all over the country; it articulates with programs at Potsdam and other schools. 

 

Mr. Masterpole said it seems there is a mixed message - can’t reach a contract with staff, pool is too expensive to rehabilitate, but now spending almost $19 million expanding on space they have needed for 20 years.  Dr. Sydow said for any organization it is always a struggle to balance expense and investment, sees this as an investment based upon the growth of the college, as an investment not only for the college but for the citizens of Onondaga County who are relying on the college especially in these economic times to get the training they need to get jobs. 

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Rapp, seconded by Mr. Lesniak to approve this item; Ayes:  4 (Rapp, Lesniak, Dougherty, Tassone), Noes:  0, Abstentions:  1 (Masterpole); MOTION CARRIED.

 

        c.       Approving the Onondaga Community College Election of the Early Retirement Incentive Program as Authorized by Chapter 105, Laws of 2010 for the Eligible Employees of the County of Onondaga

The college in its analysis determined that only people with the title of full professor would be eligible for Part A Incentive – this would provide the maximum net savings and would also meet the 50% savings level over two years required by state legislation.  There are 41 college employees who are eligible and there will be a net savings regardless of the number who take the incentive, estimate 10% and 25% will take advantage, Board of Trustees has approved it.  Local sponsor approval is required in order to participate in the NYS early retirement program.

 

Mr. Lesniak asked about the additional incentive of $500 per year for each year of service at the college.  Dr. Sydow said their contract provides a window when employees who are at retirement age get an added incentive if they retire earlier rather than later, many of them have passed that mark and don’t get that incentive, they are trying to offset that.  The $500 was included in their calculations and it still came out to a net savings.  Mr. Lesniak said he has a problem with OCC getting something different than the rest of the County employees.  Dr. Sydow noted they have their own set of workforce issues in terms of trying to ensure that they have the right mix of instructors and full professors.  In answer to Mr. Masterpole, Dr. Sydow said savings to the college didn’t pan out when they looked at other categories of employees.

 

Mr. Dougherty asked about growing classroom space while encouraging people they need to teach to leave.  Dr. Sydow referred to having the right mix, could hire an instructor for roughly $25,000 less than a full professor.  It is often advantageous to the student to be taught by someone who is either fresh out of grad school or who is currently working in the industry who knows the latest technology.  Their adjunct workforce is extremely valuable to the college; they are bringing the students a fresh perspective of what is happening in the industry.

 

Mrs. Tassone asked if they needed to offer the $500 in order to get the required percentage of professors to retire.  Dr. Sydow said “yes”, turnover at OCC is non-existent.  Mr. Rhinehart noted that the $500 is not coming from Onondaga County government, it is a college decision and the college is paying for it and realizing the savings, has no problem with it.  Mr. Masterpole said this is a decision made by the college’s board of trustees and he would support it.  Dr. Sydow said each SUNY institution is analyzing how this incentive can best help that institution reach its employee goals; will see a wide range of costs.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Masterpole, seconded by Mrs. Rapp to approve this item; Ayes: 4 (Rapp, Masterpole, Dougherty, Tassone); Noes:  0; Abstentions: 1 (Lesniak).

 

5.       Amending the 2010 County Budget to Provide Funding for the Syracuse Nationals to Market the King of Trucks Event, to be Held in Onondaga County over Memorial Day Weekend 2011 (Sponsored by Mrs. Rapp)

Mr. Holder mentioned that the Syracuse Nationals would be in town for the upcoming weekend - 7,000 cars, 35% from out of state, 70,000 attendees, 12% of those from out of state, a huge tourism impact for our area, roughly generating $35 million dollars of travel spending.  The organizers of that event have come up with another idea for our area.  King of Trucks event would bring in 2,000 trucks the first year, about 20,000 spectators, vendors, live music, off road displays, races – a very family friendly, festival-like atmosphere.  Cost to put on this event will be roughly $340,000; event planners are anticipating about a $125,000 gap that will have to be made up with sponsorship and public support.  Memorial Day weekend is traditionally a very dead weekend for travel to Onondaga County, asking the County for some seed money ($25,000) to help trigger private sponsorships and some other in-kind support.

 

 

Mrs. Rapp advised that ROT collections are ahead of budget, money would come from that.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Lesniak, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

6.     DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION:  Jean Smiley, Deputy County Executive

        a.     A Local Law Authorizing the Sale of County Property to John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc., D/B/A Production Products Company

Company employees about 800 people, they are looking to expand their operation to stay competitive in the market place and stay in the county.  County owns two pieces of property next to this company – one is a small piece adjacent to the company’s property that houses the county’s salt shed and a larger piece that houses the North Area Garage.  The company is also interested in the larger piece, but there is not a proposal at this time.  According to the agreement:

  • Company will pay the County to move the salt shed and relocate the salt to the County’s North Area Garage property ($202,891). 
  • Company will pay the appraised price ($87,000) for the small piece of property.  

Mr. Lesniak questioned relocating the salt shed to property that might not be owned by the county in the near future.  Ms. Smiley said in terms of a cost benefit, if they do decide to move out, it would be two to three years from now.  Mr. Mr. Lesniak asked about looking at municipalities or school districts for storage of the salt, Mr. Donnelly advised that travel time to get to another area with the trucks would be a disadvantage.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Masterpole, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Appropriate Anticipated Revenues from the Sale of County Property to John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc., Doing Business as PPC (335,891) (Sponsored by Mrs. Rapp)

A motion was made by Mr. Masterpole, seconded by Mrs. Tassone to approve this item; passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:35 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Johanna H. Robb

Deputy Clerk

* * *

PLANNING & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE - JULY 15, 2010

KATHLEEN A. RAPP, CHAIR

MEMBERS PRESENT: Mr. Dougherty, Ms. Williams, *Mr. Stanczyk

ABSENT: Mr. DeMore

ALSO PRESENT:  Mr. Masterpole, Mr. Rhinehart, see also attached list  

 

Chair Rapp called the meeting to order at 10:40 a.m.  A motion was made by Ms. Williams, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to waive the reading and approve the minutes of the proceedings of the previous committee meeting.  MOTION CARRIED.

 

The Chairman took the agenda out of order.

 

4.     A Resolution Calling a Public Hearing in Connection with the Proposal to Enact a Local Law Providing Partial Exemption from Real Property Taxes for Certain Historic Properties as Authorized by Section 444-A of the New York Real Property Tax Law (Sponsored by Mr. Masterpole)

  • Provide sliding scale County Property Tax Exemption for improvements to historic structures
  • Applies only to those towns, villages and cities with an existing mechanism to deem properties historic
  • Mirrors city of Syracuse legislation allowed by NYS
  • Uniform exemption for rehabilitation of historic properties
  • County property taxes will still be paid during the 100% exemption period at the assessed value prior to rehabilitation
  • Exemption does not apply to school taxes

 

Mr. Masterpole stated that a countywide Historic Board could be created and/or towns and villages that do not have a board could create one to be eligible for this exemption.

 

A motion was made by Chair Rapp, seconded by Ms. Williams to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; CARRIED.

 

5.     A Local Law Relating to a Partial Exemption from Real Property Taxes for Certain Historic Properties as Authorized by Section 444-A of the New York State Real Property Tax Law (Sponsored by Mr. Masterpole)

 

Resolution may be brought before the August committee.   Ms. Tarolli stated that the resolution does not require a vote prior to going to Session.

 

1.     INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: Ken Beam, Chief Information Officer

        a.     Create R.P. 01 10270000 0003 1263, Systems Administrator, Grade 12 @ $50,965 - $56,420, effective August 14, 2010

Abolish R.P. 01 10270000 0003 9934, Information Systems Coordinator, Grade 12 @ $50,965 -$56,420, effective August 14, 2010

 

A motion was made by Ms. Williams, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; CARRIED.

 

2.     ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT:  Mary Beth Primo, Director

        a.     Amending the 2010 County budget to Appropriate Revenues from the Trust for Cultural Resources of the County of Onondaga for Purposes of Economic Development ($40,000)

 

  • Late in 2007 NYS IDA’s lost the authority to issue tax free bonding for civic organizations
  • The Onondaga Civic Development Corporation (OCDC) and Cultural Resources Trust (CRT) provide an alternative for tax free bonding to cultural non-profit organizations
  • The Office of Economic Development has been performing the administrative duties for both the OCDC and CRT since 2009
  • CRT closed their first bond financing; $165 million dollar project for Syracuse University
  • 2010 contract states CRT would pay Economic Development $75,000 for administrative work
  • $40,000 to be used for 101 – regular employee salaries due to increased administrative work for the CRT
  • NYS Comptroller has over site of the CRT

 

*Mr. Stanczyk arrived at the meeting.

 

In response to Chair Rapp, Ms. Primo stated the CRT has brought in $721,000.   The balance of these funds will be used to pay for legal fees, insurance and to provide grants to cultural organizations within the County. 

Chair Rapp asked to be provided with a list of funds brought in and given out for 2010.

 

A motion was made by Ms. Williams, seconded by Mr. Dougherty to approve this item. Ayes: 3  Abstained:  1 (Stanczyk); Motion CARRIED.

 

3.     COMPTROLLER: Robert E. Antonacci II, Comptroller; James Maturo, Deputy Comptroller; Phil Britt, Auditor in Charge of Engagement

        a.     Release of Oncenter Audit - Robert E. Antonacci II, Comptroller (Copy on file with the Clerk)

 

Audit Purpose

  • After a request for additional funding in October 2009; to determine purpose, scope and potential for further request for increase in subsidy

Audit Scope

  • Defined as an audit of Business Model and Management Agreement with Onondaga County
  • Management Agreement was not being followed (see Appendix 1)

Audit Goals

  • Transparency

                →     Monitor flow of dollars between entities

                →     Oncenter is subsidized using ROT money

                →     Oncenter uses ROT funds to pay for utilities; repair and maintenance cost of county buildings

                →     Disclose true cost and use of ROT dollars

                        □      Recommend Facilities Management handles the repair, maintenance and utilities (see Appendix 9)

  • Accountability

                →     Core mission of the Oncenter is to generate economic growth

                →     Oncenter was used to run and subsidize the employee cafeteria; loosing over $100,000 annually

                        □      Support current efforts to relieve the Corporation of the burden of operating the Civic Center Cafeteria and Madison café at a loss

                                (RFP issued to outsource the cafeteria)

                        □      Recommend revised reporting models (see Appendix 6)

  • Tax payer protection

                →     Lowering the total cost to the taxpayer while maximizing the investment and minimizing the subsidy       

Findings

  • Many factors contributed to the subsidy request
  • Notable items are repairs and maintenance, utilities, cafeteria and personnel cost
  • Oncenter lost track of Personnel charges
  • Repairs that should have been capital were being charged as operational and vice versa
  • Oncenter must enhance the financial reporting; allowing all stakeholders to react quickly

Recommendations (Summary of Recommendations – see page 18)

  • Reduce total cost to the tax payer
  • Maximize investment in complex
  • Insure understanding of the benefits of continued investment

Economic Development

  • Revisit the purpose and goals of ROT money

                →     Percentage of ROT money given to the Oncenter has decreased over time

                →     ROT money is the driving force 

                →     Oncenter is a big part of the Economic Development for Onondaga County

  

In response to Mr. Stanczyk, Mr. Antonacci stated the original indebtedness is retired.  There is a contractual agreement to repay the parking revenues.

 

Chair Rapp stated the CRT could be a great revenue source to fund cultural events.  The ROT dollars could be used to generate business.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:10 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Katherine M. French

Assistant Clerk

* * *

WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE MINUTES – JULY 2, 2010

CASEY E. JORDAN, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Buckel, Mr. Stanczyk, Mr. Holmquist, Mr. Warner

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Kinne, Mr. Corbett, Mr. Lesniak, Mr. Kilmartin

ALSO ATTENDING:  Chairman Rhinehart, William E. Meyer, Jr., see also attached list

 

Chairman Jordan called the meeting to order at 8:33 a.m.

 

1.     COUNTY EXECUTIVE:  William Fisher, Deputy County Executive; James Rowley, CFO

        a.     A Local Law Electing a Retirement Incentive Program as Authorized by Chapter 105, Laws of 2010 (Part A) for the Eligible Employees of the Co. of Onondaga (Sponsored by Mr. Lesniak, Mr. Rhinehart)

        b.     A Local Law Electing a Retirement Incentive Program as Authorized by Chapter 105, Laws of 2010 (Part B) for the Eligible Employees of the Co. of Onondaga (Sponsored by Mr. Lesniak, Mr. Rhinehart)

Mr. Fisher distributed the following as well as a copy of a letter addressed to all county employees from the County Executive (on file with Clerk) which explains why she has asked for these two local laws and explanation of the Part A and Part B benefits.

1

2

3

45


Mr. Fisher noted:

  • NYS began discussion about the ERI earlier in the year – County started tracking it at that point – reports from DMB and Personnel provided to Co. Executive
  • NYS passed ERI in early June – County did an analysis; options were presented to the Co. Executive, and she chose to go forward with Plan A and Plan B

Plan A:

  • Targeted incentive (people are not automatically part of it) – Co. Exec. will have to provide a list of the titles
  • List has to go to the Secretary of State and NYS Retirement system before the open period begins
  • Best estimate is that it will be sent around the middle of the month

 

Mr. Stanczyk asked if the target positions will be identifies prior to a vote on Tuesday; Mr. Fisher said “no.”.  Mr. Stanczyk said that if there is to be an inclusion or non inclusion of some employees it would be appropriate for legislators to know before approving a plan.  Mr. Fisher said that he will explain the process--that there is some complexity that can’t be resolved until employees decide what they will do.  When the legislation is passed, employees will let them know for sure if they plan to retire.  Mr. Stanczyk noted that the estimates provided by DMB are based on all titles being eligible.  Mr. Fisher noted that it is the Co. Executive’s goal to make this as broad as possible.

  • Specific number cannot be provided today, but majority of eligible employees would be targeted
  • Getting input from departments; Chairman Rhinehart has inquired about 911--number of eligible people are there.  There have been a series of meetings held to determine if everyone who is eligible goes, will the County be stuck; how will they train people.  If too many go, and there is a hole in operation center, it is a huge problem.  There is a 6 month training process in 911--can’t send 15 people out the door and get 15 people off the street--not realistic.

Mr. Stanczyk said that if a plan is adopted, it should be fair.  Mr. Jordan noted that this is talking about critical positions, i.e. 911 – where there is extensive training involved--can’t let everyone go at once.  Mr. Fisher said they are looking at it as a broader operational impact rather than a specific title or specific person--trying to understand the impact on a department or an elected office

  • Need to make sure that there are real savings – State requires a savings for 50% of the annual salaries of the people leaving under Part A for each of the next two years – between $6.5 million - $8.5 million each year
  • If the County doesn’t deliver the savings, State could make the County and example

Mr. Buckel said that the State can’t take away the benefits--questioned what the downside is.  Mr. Stanczyk said that they could fine the County.  Mr. Rowley said it is not defined by the State.

  • Once eligible, a person has to retire within the open period 
  • One month of service credit for each year of service up to 36 mos. of addl. service --allows some employees to get above the 30 year mark (no penalty for retirement)
  • In general, employees eligible are those eligible under normal ERS System
  • Police with 20 year retirement system are not eligible
  • 50 years of age with 10 years of service or 55 with 5 years of service – generally eligible

Mr. Buckel noted that the real advantage is for the 18 year employee, not the 25-30 year employee–that is where the real money comes in for them.  He asked if most of the people forecasted are in that 15–18 year range.  Mr. Rowley said that they are for the most part.  It was paired down based on how people get penalized by the retirement system should they leave earlier than allowed under the rules.  They looked at the people that would get penalized the most but still eligible under the plan -- categorized as “unlikely”-- about 10% of that population would go.  The people that would benefit under the incentive plan that were close, but needed time to get them over the hump, for years of service or age, were categorized as “likely”.  The 1,375 employees eligible were paired down quickly to estimates of 260 – 335.  Mr. Fisher noted that in January there were 4,066 filled positions—one third of the work force is retirement eligible. 

 

Mr. Buckel questioned if the County is at risk for losing expertise.  Mr. Rowley said that for illustration purposes, this is enterprise wide – didn’t look at it department by department.  Information is being collected--there will be a lot better idea once the local laws are passed.  Mr. Fisher said that there is concern that expertise will go out the door.  Last year Robert Antonacci, Comptroller, suggested an early retirement incentive where employees could be hired back after they retired as long as they only work up to half time and spend up to $30,000 on them.  Employees would be paid extra money and the County would retain the expertise.  The CSEA rejected the idea last year.  The Co. Executive feels it is a good idea, and it could be done this year.  Mr. Buckel is concerned about the public reaction – giving employees the benefit and then they come back.  Mr. Rowley felt it would be few and far between.  These are permanent savings, if 300 people leave and 150 positions are saved, there are a 150 that are forever gone--savings are accrued year after year.

 

Mr. Buckel said in reviewing the history of these programs, the numbers never materialize--the State did a plan once and ended up with more workers.  Mr. Jordan said that the positions that people retire from are positions that are eliminated--can’t turn around and have department heads hire in those positions.  He suggested that if people are requested to be brought back on a part time basis that they come before the legislature.  Mr. Rowley cautioned that if, for example, Mental Health or Social Services had 150 people walk out the door; it is unsustainable.  Mr. Fisher said that if the strategy is to eliminate a position when there is a retirement, then they will pull this off the table – that is unmanageable.  To get to 50% savings, some will be filled because they are essential, some will not be filled.  They will look at departments – restructure and reorganize – look at ways to get to the 50% savings.  Mr. Fisher said that the County will get below 4,000 and keep going.  Mr. Jordan said that the department can always come back and say that they can’t sustain the loss and legislators can look at it.  He suggested that a list come back with all the positions that people have retired from; if the list needs to be paired down for the sake of operating government then, it can be.  Mr. Fisher said that if 300 people retire, there will not be a reduction of 300 positions.  Mr. Jordan said that he didn’t expect that, but there has to be a reduction in the authorized positions.

 

Mr. Fisher noted that the sooner they know who is retiring, the easier it is for them to come to the legislature with specifics.  On September 15th when the budget is presented, some of this information will be known, but not all of it.  They will know some of the jobs that will be eliminated, but some of the other jobs have money behind them that doesn’t match up with the 101; they will need to figure out which ones will not be funded, eliminated, and it will not be something that will be done by October 15th.  There will be work on this after October 15th and next year.

 

Mr. Jordan asked if a grant funds a program, and the provisions of those services were outsourced so there is no longer County positions on the books for that program, does it count toward the required 50% reduction.  Mr. Fisher said that it does; there is some flexibility, but it has to show up in the 101.  Mr. Jordan asked if part of the overall analysis is determining how many positions can be outsourced to get them permanently off the county books, while still providing the services.  Mr. Fisher said that it will be part of the analysis.

 

Mr. Stanczyk said that there are so many employees that are of retirement age, some expertise will be lost, but gained over time.  The younger employee is less costly; it is a good transition.  It is encouraging retirements rather than having layoffs.  Mr. Fisher said that these will be voluntary decisions. 

 

Mr. Fisher explained:

  • Plan A – option for how long the open period is – minimum is 30 days, maximum is 90 days.
  • Co. Exec. has asked that the open window by 47 days.  The quickest the legislature could move on this would be July 6th.  Once passed there has to be a local law public hearing – scheduled for July 13th.  Following the public hearing, the Co. Exec. will make a decision to veto or not.  If not vetoed, the law will be sent to the State with the list of targeted employees on Part A and list of excluded employees on Part B 
  • Nassau County passed a 21 day period between the passage of the local law and beginning of open period.  NYS Retirement felt that was a realistic window; Law Dept. suggested having 3 weeks between passage and open period. 
  • Want this completed in time for it to be factored into budget planning for next year – employees will have to give the County notice 21 days before the end of the open period (August 20th)
  • Employees have to file with the State 14 days before the end of the open period (August 27th)
  • It is felt that a significant amount of employees will go a little bit earlier -- to get retirement checks to start up quicker, one should retire the second to last day of the month
  • If departments know who is going, they can put it into the budget.  If it is not known until after the budget is done, they will have to make assumptions or do layoffs.  Then, if there are more retirements than originally thought, revoke the layoffs.

In answer to Mr. Stanczyk regarding the amount of cost to the county, Mr. Fisher explained it depends on how many people retire.  DMB has a model that worked pretty well 8 years ago.  Mr. Rowley explained that using the targeted numbers between 260 – 335, the County would be required to save $13 million over two years, about $6.5 million annually.  On the high end it would be $17 million for two years; $8.5 million annually.  The savings will be incurred year after year – looking at it as a permanent head count reduction that won’t come back.  To get $13 million savings over two years, the County would have to pay roughly $7.9 million.  It is not totally out of pocket; some of the retirement costs will be aided – i.e. if Medicaid people retire, the cost to pay for some of the incentive would be part of their fringe and the County would get some aid on that.  If some Community Development people retire, some of the grant dollars can be used to pay for some of the incentives.  The balance would fall to fund balance.  Mr. Fisher said that it can be paid via an installment plan and give NYS a lot of interest (8%) or made as a lump sum payment.  Mr. Rowley added that if people retire out of WEP, Metro Water, or libraries, those funds would be hit for their portion accordingly.  Mr. Fisher said that they plan to put this into the 2011 budget.  It is due Feb. 1, 2012, but that payment is usually calculated a year ahead of time and would end up paying it at the end of next year.  There will be a one year bump up in the 120 line in the budget as an expense; in County General there will be the reduction in fund balance.  Mr. Maturo said that it known that the payment will be due December 15th of next year.  There will be minor discount of 1% because it will be paid in December as opposed to February of 2012, which is done every year with the retirement bill.  Mr. Jordan said that the payment could be close to the savings once state and federal dollars are utilized.  Mr. Rowley said that it won’t be a one-year payback; it is clearly two years, but it is recurring savings year after year. 

 

Mr. Fisher said that the model took the 375 number -- people that are 55 with 27.7 years would be attracted to part B -- a 40% likely rate.  Someone who is 50 with 28 years might be 20% likely to go out; the model shows who could go and at what percentage is likely to go.  The model used 8 years ago came with 12 or 13 of the actual count that retried.  There is some confidence that it is a good model.  If the number turns out to be 500, it is going to be a big problem; couldn’t likely get 50% savings on whatever number is behind 500 retirees.  The sweet spot is between 300 – 350 people.  On average over the last few years and going forward, the forecast is that 105 people leave voluntarily yearly.  The people that would probably retire now are the ones that would probably retire in the next 4 years; about 420 people.  To get more precision, they have started to ask people.  He and Mrs. Smiley have met with all department heads, all elected officials or their representatives.  Now specific information is coming in and specific things are being plugged in, i.e. cost of terminal leave.  Some departments have very large numbers – DSS has a lot of eligible people.  The State Retirement System won’t talk to employees until the local law is passed.  It is felt that after this passes, employees will tell departments heads so that there is a very real list and it will be known what the risks and exposures are. 

Part B.

  • Open to all qualified employees unless excluded
  • 55 years of age with at least 25 years of service credit
  • Retire without benefit reduction (normally there is a significant penalty until 30 years of services credit is reached)
  • 98 employees are eligible
  • No discretion over open period – 90 day window, Oct. 15th – Dec. 29th
  • 21 days before the end of the period, the employee would have to give notice to the County; 14 days before the close of the period they would have to tell the State (Dec. 15th)
  • Everyone eligible under Part B is also eligible under Part A – can’t get both - they have to make a decision
  • Estimate that 40 people will opt for it

Mr. Rowley said the saving for 40 people would translate to about $2 million in annual base salaries.  There is not a required savings plan from the State under Part B; can refill all of these positions 100% if the County wanted to.  It doesn’t make any sense to do that; self imposing 50% savings plan in this area; about $1 million in savings.  The cost is 110% of salary; payback is a little longer.   In answer to Mr. Stanczyk, Mr. Fisher said that they haven’t tried to figure out that if someone is eligible for Part A, will it change their thinking on Part B.  If the estimate of 40 goes down by 5; then part A will go up by 5.  In answer to Mr. Jordan, Mr. Rowley said that the same terms apply as in part A, wherein some positions may be aided.  For the $2 million savings, in rough terms, the County would have to pay $2.2 million.  It is approximately a 3- year pay back. Mr. Fisher explained:  

Exclusions:

  • Employees can’t receive both Part A and Part B – have to chose between them
  • Employees in special 20-year plans are not eligible for either incentive
  • Elected officials are not eligible

Goals:

  • Looking for cost take outs on a recurring basis – can wait for it to happen organically – drags out – probably can’t get enough costs taken out of system so have to hit with layoffs each year
  • Layoffs have a debilitating effect on the organization – bumping starts, people are upset – 3 or 4 months where it is not a productive work environment
  • Even with this plan, there is going to have to be continued reduction – don’t think they can get to where they need to get to with just the ERI
  • Have to reduce costs; this is a better way; minimizes some of the negative impacts of doing it either through layoffs or multiyear attrition process
  • Cultural impact – suddenly 350 people leave and other employees feel that they have a chance to advance before they thought they could have – may work harder, come up with clever ways to do less with less
  • At a departmental level there will be opportunities to rethink how they are doing business.  Personnel Dept. will have to help departments rethink how titles are structured.
  • Provide opportunity for leadership to think more globally – do we need all of these departments – can some merge, should some things be outsourced, opportunity to do things very differently
  • Hope the end result will be a more dynamic work environment, people more satisfied with their jobs – know they will have to work harder, but there will be rewards – leads to heavily talented workers replacing those that are leaving – maybe more technologically adept, maybe more enthusiastic about the public service aspect
  • Opportunities in the long run to improve quality of workforce

 

Mr. Stanczyk asked to be provided with how much the County paid for unemployment benefits for the first 3 – 6 months of the year based on the layoffs that occurred last year.  He is dismayed that there is discussion about layoffs already for next year – was hoping that the reductions seen from the ERI would aid in restructuring and avoid layoffs. 

 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:20 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

DEBORAH L. MATURO, Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

* * *

WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE MINUTES – JULY 16, 2010

CHAIRMAN CASEY E. JORDAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Corbett, Mr. Holmquist, Mr. Buckel, Mr. Kilmartin, Mr. Warner

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Stanczyk, Mr. Kinne, Mr. Lesniak

ALSO PRESENT:  Chairman Rhinehart, Mr. Meyer, see also attached list

 

Chairman Jordan called the meeting to order at 8:30 a.m.  A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Buckel; to waive the reading of the minutes of the previous committee meeting.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.  A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Warner to approve the minutes of the previous committee meeting.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

CONSENT AGENDA

1.     EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS:

        a.     Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into Agreements for a Tactical Interoperable Communications Plan (TICP) Through the Central New York Interoperable Communications Consortium (CNYICC)

2.     VAN DUYN:

        a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept Funds to Allow Van Duyn Home and Hospital to Implement a Contract with Select Rehabilitation to Provide Van Duyn Residents with Therapeutic Services ($650,000)

3.     WEP:

        a.       Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into a Contract with the United States of America, Department of the Interior, for the Operation and Maintenance of Stream Gauging Stations in the County of Onondaga ($74,240)

        b.       Authorizing the County of Onondaga to Enter into a Memorandum of Understanding with the City of Syracuse to Share in Funding of Development and/or Use of a Stormwater Run-Off Model ($80,000)

        c.       Authorizing the County of Onondaga to Enter into Amendment No. 2 to the 2007 IMA, as Amended, with the City of Syracuse to Revise the Easements Granted by the City to the County for the Harbor Brook Interceptor System Improvement Project

4.     OCPL:

        a.     Combining Previously Authorized Capital Projects into the OCPL Comprehensive Branches Infrastructure Capital Project, and Amending Res. Nos. 109 - 2007, 131 - 2007, 105 - 2008 and 117 - 2009 ($1,047,867)

5.     PARKS:

        a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept a Grant from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into an Agreement with the City of Syracuse for Improvements to Burnet Park ($285,000)

        b.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Accept Funds from BOCES for the Installation of High Speed Internet at Beaver Lake Nature Center, and Authorizing the County Executive to enter into Contracts ($7,000)

6.     ROOM OCCUPANCY TAX:

        a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Provide Funding for the Syracuse Nationals to Market the King of Trucks Event, to be Held in Onondaga County over Memorial Day Weekend 2011 (Sponsored by Mrs. Rapp)

7.     INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY:

        a.     Create R.P. 01 10270000 0003 1263, Systems Administrator, Grade 12 @ $50,965 - $56,420, effective August 14, 2010; Abolish R.P. 01 10270000 0003 9934, Information Systems Coordinator, Grade 12 @ $50,965 - $56,420, effective August 14, 2010

 

In answer to Mr. Warner in regard to item 2a, Mrs. Sprague said that Select Rehabilitation will provide the service, submit billing documents that will be put though Medicare A and B and private pays.  It is anticipated to be a monthly billing package for revenues of $280,805/month with a cost of  $154,891/month.  The profit per month should be about $125,914.  The calculation does not include employees being transitioned.  An estimate of employee savings, if all 12 employees go to Select Rehabilitation, would be a $1 million.  There was a contract between the County and the CSEA union – employees broken down into 3 groups – 5 long term employees were given the option of staying on with therapy services until 2014.  Of that group 3 of them are possible retirees.  The second group of four employees had the option to stay on to 2012 and receive their health insurance benefit when they retire.  The remaining third group has the option of staying on to 2012 without recieving health insurance benefit when they retire.  So far, two employees have decided to go with Select Rehabilitation.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Warner, seconded by Mr. Kilmartin to approve all items on the consent agenda.  AYES:  5 (Jordan, Corbett, Holmquist, Kilmartin, Warner); NOES:  0; ABSTENTIONS: 1 (Buckel).  MOTION CARRIED.

 

REGULAR AGENDA

 

2.     ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT:  Marybeth Primo, Director

        a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Appropriate Revenues from the Trust for Cultural Resources of the County of Onondaga for Purposes of Economic Development ($40,000)

  • Accept $75K for administrative work that the Economic Dev. Office has done for Trust for Cultural Resources of Onon. Co.
  • Appropriate $40K to Economic Development’s budget to cover increased cost in 101
  • Trust supports arts and cultural organizations of Onondaga County – provides a vehicle for tax free bond financing
  • A project was financed for SU earlier this year, $165 million bond financing; used to renovate green data center and to refinance outstanding bonds with SIDA - $75K comes from a portion of a fee for doing the work
  • $40K is needed due to increased demand on Economic Dev. Staff through CRT and OCDC; and admin. intern from the Maxwell School was kept on to help with the organizations
  • In the 2010 budget $54K was appropriated to Economic Dev. to cover the expenses; $35K would be used to reduce that share of local dollars
  • $75K appropriated - $35K would go to surplus revenue; $40K will be used to cover cost of admin. intern

A motion was made by Mr. Kilmartin, seconded by Mr. Buckel to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     BOARD OF ELECTIONS:  Helen Kiggins, Edward Ryan, Commissioners

        a.     Transfer $9,500 from 300 Acct. Supplies & Materials to 408 Acct. Professional Services

  • Amended contract with NTS, Niagara Falls, NY (voter registration/election software ) to add Custodians and Asset  Management and Tracking System
  • Since HAVA there are many things to keep track of (cones, privacy booths, machines, ramps, etc. – 4,000 – 5,000 pieces to keep track of)
  • State Board requires that seals be put on each voting system as they are sent out – 6 seals each of approximately 8 digits long – to manually enter them creates mistakes and takes a lot of time
  • Annual cost of $9,500
  • If the state develops a system, which might be available next year, then they would likely go with the free state system next year

 

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Holmquist to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

In answer to Mr. Warner, Ms. Kiggins said that the cost of a special election varies depending on the district; approximately $25,000.

 

4.     TRANSPORTATION:  Jim Rowley, CFO

       a.     Amending the 2010 County Budget to Appropriate Anticipated Revenues From the Sale of County Property to John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc., D/B/A as PPC ($335,891)

  • Sell approx. 3 acre parcel to PPC, a long standing company in community, employs over 800 people, been here over 70 years –need space to stay competitive and expand their business
  • The 3 acre parcel currently houses a salt shed at the North Area facility
  • PPC paid for/obtained a fair market appraisal on the parcel, valued at $87K
  • PPC has agreed to pay for the cost of moving the salt shed and salt, cost estimated to be approx. $248K
  • PPC has a desire to move this as quickly as possible

 

Mr. Buckel noted that the presents PPC in other contexts and will need to abstain as it is a direct conflict.

 

Mr. Donnelly reviewed an aerial photo and explained the layout of the North Area facility, the proposed property to be purchased by PPC, and the current PPC facility property.  PPC will be able to do some winter construction; it is advantageous to them for this to move quickly.  By the November timeframe the shed would be up and running for the County and they would have full access to the property.  The County scoped out the site; worked with Parklane, original manufacturer of the shed – worked on traffic flow, how salt truck would make deliveries, etc – very doable in this location.  No permit is necessary for the County regarding the salt shed; PPC is doing a phase 1 and phase 2 environmental assessment of the property.  PPC will pay for the disassembly and reassembly of the salt shed; it will be contracted out. 

 

Regarding cost overruns, Mrs. Tarolli said that the cost is set at $202,891 for the relocation of the shed, but moving the salt is actual costs.  Mr. Donnelly said that the $202,891 is to design, spec and build the shed; they are comfortable with it – includes rental of cranes, rigging and everything that could possibly be involved in it.  The County will enter into the contracts.  Mrs. Tarolli explained that there is not a contract with the purchaser for the land, but there will be prior to session.  Mr. Kilmartin advised that there be an agreement regarding indemnification for any cost overruns for construction or deconstruction, or any incidentals with it. 

 

In answer to Mr. Kilmartin, Mrs. Tarolli said that the County has two appraisers that are used all of the time; the purchaser picks one of them and pays for it.  Mr. Kilmartin asked if the appraised value is generally consistent with the assessed value of other parcels in the area.  Mrs. Tarolli did not know, but believes that there was a comfort with the appraisal.  Mr. Donnelly said that he did not check on other values in the area.

 

Chairman Jordan asked if there could be cost overruns for the proposed relocation of the salt shed.  Mr. Donnelly said that the intent is that there will be no ground penetration; it will be on a concrete foundation, which will be laid on the ground.  Parklane reviewed this; he is confident that where it was recommended for relocation would work as is.  Chairman Jordan agreed with Mr. Kilmartin’s comments regarding language included that if there are cost overruns that it will be PPC’s responsibility. 

 

Mr. Kilmartin asked who has been taking the lead on the conversation with PPC; Mrs. Tarolli said it has been a combination of DOT, Co. Executive, and Law Dept.  Mr. Kilmartin suggested that the resolution be amended to provide indemnifying the County for any cost overruns for transportation, relocation and salt shed tear down.  Mrs. Tarolli said that the relocation of the salt is already at no cost to the county.  They can go back to the purchaser and say that it is a desire of the legislature to put a cap on the cost of the relocation of the storage shed.  Mr. Kilmartin asked that the Law Dept. discuss the amendment with the purchaser.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Kilmartin to amend the resolution to provide for a provision that the purchaser will indemnify the County for any cost overruns in the demolition and reconstruction of the salt shed.  Mr. Warner seconded the amendment.  AYES:  6; NOES:  0; ABSTENTIONS:  1 (Buckel)

 

A motion was made by Mr. Kilmartin, seconded by Mr. Corbett to approve the resolution as amended.  AYES:  5; NOES:  0; ABSTENTIONS:  1 (Buckel)

 

        b.     A Local Law Authorizing the Sale of County Property to John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc., D/B/A Production Products Company

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Holmquist to approve this item.  AYES:  5; NOES:  0; ABSTENTIONS:  1 (Buckel)

 

1.     EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT:  Joe Rinefierd

        a.     Amend 2010 Budget to Accept Homeland Security Funds From the State Homeland Security Grant Program for the Onondaga Co. Department of Emergency Management, and Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into Contracts to Implement this Resolution ($751,269)

  • 3rd year of annual grant received
  • Maintains personnel currently employed in dept.; no new employees – they are totally grant funded
  • Balance goes to consultant services – part of Homeland Security for doing the planning part – updated emergency response plans, etc.
  • Equipment to maintain Hazmat – both on city and county sides
  • Supplies to maintain EOC
  • Travel costs – when they have to meet in Albany
  • Updates to EOC
  • No local dollars used

 

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Holmquist, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

In answer to Mr. Corbett, the $100K vehicle is the regional HazMat Response vehicle for City Hazmat – it will replace one of their units.  It hauls all HazMat suits, devices, equipment – it will be used in 3 counties.  This is a small portion to apply to the vehicle.  In answer to Mr. Buckel regarding radios, it is part of the replacement costs; added some portable mobile radios.  Regarding reimbursement for the use of the response vehicle, Mr. Rinefierd thought it would be part of the MOU. 

 

Mr. Warner asked about the Homeland Security grants and working with Madison and Oswego Counties—and if it is already in the contract that a purchase of equipment will be serving Madison and Oswego Counties.  Mr. Rinefierd said that this particular grant allow $100K to help offset the cost of the truck.  Under the UASI grant it will be included that it will be used for Madison, Oswego and Onondaga Counties.  Mr. Warner questioned reimbursement of use of the truck, when the grant states that it will be used in the three counties.  In answer to Mr. Warner, Mr. Rinefierd said that when the grant application is put together, Homeland Security has to approve everything before it comes to the legislature.  All of the items included are allowed by the State as expenses.  

 

Chairman Jordan asked about the radios; millions of dollars are being spent equipping agencies with interoperable communication system and radios – are the radios in this grant an addition to the radios being purchased through other grant funding.  Mr. Rinefierd said that they are – agencies were cut short because of the funding allotment; not all were 100% funded.  Some of the HazMat agencies that participate did not get intrinsic safe radios because the money was not spent to buy them, as it was considered an extra cost at that time.

 

A motion as made by Mr. Kilmartin, seconded by Mr. Corbett to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

5.     FACILITIES MANAGEMENT:  Brian Lynch, Commissioner

        a.     Authorize the Co. of Onondaga to Enter into an Agreement with the City of Syr. for County Processing of the City’s Mail and Amend ’10 Budget to Accept Revenues from Such Agreement

  • County’s high speed mail machine has been running for 9 mos. – saves contractual costs and lowers bulk postage rates – savings of $75,000
  • Intention was to reach out to other municipalities
  • County will process all of City’s mail – lower City’s tax base from what they pay now in processing fees; charged back monthly for actual postage used
  • $2,300/mo. Processing fee – includes licensing, software fees, repairs/maintenance, gas to post office – amount agreed upon by DMB, Facilities Management, and City Administration
  • Rate was determined by putting together a large spread sheet with all personnel costs, approximate time to process City mail, licensing fees, etc.
  • County will not take on any addition staff; City achieves staff savings and contract savings
  • Other potential users:  have reached out to City School Dist.; would like to reach out to OCC
  • Will not get over capacitated with the equipment – can process up to 7,000 letters/hr.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Kilmartin, seconded by Mr. Buckel to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

6.     PARKS:

        a.     A Local Law Amending Local Laws Imposing the Fees Collected by the Onondaga Co. Dept. of Parks and Recreation to Provide Onondaga Co. Residents with Relief from the Excessive Heat

  • Free beach days on extremely hot days – relief of county residents to take advantage of Jamesville Beach and Oneida Shores
  • Done two weeks ago -  a lot of elderly couples took advantage and were appreciative of extended hours
  • Looking to have legislation where it can be done in some sort of short order

 

Chairman Jordan pointed out that this local law is just to waive the fees for July 7th and July 8th of this year.  In answer to Mr. Warner as to why a resolution is needed since the fees were already waived for the two days.  Mrs. Tarolli said that legislation was pulled together at the last session and shown to leadership and asked if there was an objection if it was brought back at the next session (local law – couldn’t be passed at the July session).  Another version was drafted and sent to committee - for a 7 day period in any calendar year, at any given park, for an exceptional circumstance and for a demonstrable public purpose – allowing Co. Executive to waive it so that we wouldn’t have to work on a retroactive basis.  The Committee passed the version that is before Ways & Means Committee today. 

 

The revenue lost for the two days was approximately $2,500/day. Security costs were avoided by keeping the parks open. 

 

A motion was made by Mr. Buckel, seconded by Mr. Kilmartin to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

7.     OCC:  Deborah Sydow, President

        a.     Appropriate $16,900,000 of Bonds Authorized Pursuant to Res. No. 171-2009 for a Construction and Reconstruction Project at OCC and Amend the 2010 Co. Budget ($16,900,000)

  • Sept. 2009 – Co. Legislature passed 2 resolutions (nos. 171, 172) authorizing issuance of $9.48 million in bonds toward cost of addition to Ferrante Hall, total cost $13.9 million
  • Per state law, capital projects for community colleges are split between State and local sponsor
  • Appropriation (Res. 172) was only for $2 million; $1 million supported by the County, necessary to proceed with engineering, architectural and technical services
  • Per the resolution, the College was to report to the legislature upon completion of engineering, architectural and technical work, full details of such work prior to any further appropriations
  • College has been working with Cannon Design and C&S Companies to develop design, engineering work, and establish a construction project
  • Proposed addition:  includes 8 general purpose classrooms, specialized space to support music program – applications for the program have grown by more than 50% in recent years; total square footage – 43,777 sq ft.

 

Art VanGelder, C&S Engineers reviewed the power point presentation (copy on file with Clerk).

  • A number of designs were considered
  • Truss design system across gorge – connecting GSC and Ferrente Hall together
  • Use existing loading docks, students, staff have ability to move freely indoors in winter; great use of land which would not normally be used – capturing the gorge area
  • Uses:  extra performance space – 150 seat facility; practice rehearsal spaces, large reaches area; 8 multi use classrooms (smart classrooms)

Dr. Sydow noted that OCC’s goal is to have all classrooms be smart classrooms (currently at 75%).  Faculty is using instructional technologies more and more.  Also, the design of the project takes advantage of current parking outside of GSC.  Many citizens come to campus for Arts Across Campus programming.

 

  • The spaces along the bottom are mechanical spaces as well as a corridor that runs through the building. 
  • Building is designed to be LEED certified, minimal standard is silver
  • Looked at the type of mechanical systems and type of insulations required to meet standards
  • There will be lighting
  • Does not believe there will be a big maintenance cost; no different than maintaining the pedestrian bridge
  • Operating/heating costs – Steve Aiello, Trustee – extensive look was made at all alternatives – really no added expense because the base is exposed – has to be dealt with accordingly.  From a maintenance and construction standpoint it is the most efficient, expensive way to build this.  To relocate utilities on site or tying into existing utilizes is a major expense.  Feels there will be less issues this way vs. tying into a 30 year old structure.  Will not be any more expensive to heat/operate than if put on solid ground if done properly.  It is done in many urban areas.  Savings in foundation costs are dramatic.

 

Mr. Buckel commended the engineers and the architects – this is an exceptional use of space, a phenomenal accomplishment.

 

Other alternatives were:

  • Court yard area – building an addition off the court yard (south side Ferrante); $1 - $1.2 million cost of utility relocations
  • Truss like design further up the gorge with a walkway, not connecting into GSC, but connecting into Ferrante
  • Truss design closer to the bridge
  • Same type of design but east in a north/south direction along the gorge
  • Dealing with significant grade issue in terms of construction, to build 47,000 feet and try to find land without going vertical, and in keeping with the rest of the campus, not going up multiple stories is a challenge
  • The external facade may be a terra cotta type

 

Mr. Holmquist agrees this is wonderful; plans are phenomenal.  He didn’t support this project before and the reasons are all macro – the sources funding this are the State and County and neither have any money.  He tries to support the County Executive and we are supposed to do less with less. 

 

In answer to Mr. Buckel, Dr. Sydow said that the SUNY Board of Trustees is on board with this project; State legislation was authorized and appropriated in 2008 – that funding is very secure.  Half of the funding is borne by the State.

 

Mr. Kilmartin noted that in the past 3.5 years there has been an enormous number of capital dollars dedicated from the County and State to OCC.  It is consistent with the student population and use at the college – a direct proportionality between investment and use on campus for all of those attending and using the facilities at the college.  Looking historically at the college, there was a long period of time when there wasn’t much of any capital investment in the college.  The investment is not just for the college; the college is comprised of the 11,000 – 12,000 students that attend there.  This is an investment for the county taxpayers.  For many of the high schools in the county, the number one college of choice is OCC.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Kilmartin to approve this item, seconded by Mr. Buckel.

 

Mr. Buckel said that the debt load in proportion to the County tax base is really below comparable norms, and the county is in a good financial position.  He asked Mr. Rowley if the County is approchaing it limits; will this put the County over the edge on other projects.  Mr. Rowley’s said “no”; a calculation was done on what the additional debt service would be for the County and this project was included in the mix.  The County is well below standards and policy set by the legislature in terms of debt limits for the County.  This project has been on the books for a number of years.  In any forecasts that have been done, they have been well aware that this debt service was coming.  The interest rate environment is very good now.

 

Mr. Holmquist feels that this is way above and beyond what everybody else in the County family is doing.  Everyone else is downsizing, retracting and doing less with less.  He respects the numbers that Mr. Kilmartin and Dr. Sydow brought up and supports the operating budget, but cannot justify spending $10’s of millions of dollars at a time like this when it is not know what the next 2 -3 years will hold. 

 

Chairman Jordan said that he didn’t support this last; his position hasn’t changed.  The fact that we have good credit or even remote debt doesn’t mean that it is a reason for going out and borrowing more money.  He is concerned that from the macro economic sense – don’t build for maximum demand, build for optimal capacity.  He feels when demand goes down; we will be left with a lot of empty classrooms that will have to be heated and maintained.

 

AYES:  4 (Corbett, Kilmartin, Warner, Buckel); NOES: 2 (Jordan, Holmquist).  MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Approving the OCC Election of the Early Retirement Incentive Program as Authorized by Chapter 105, Laws of 2010 for the Eligible Employees of the County of Onondaga

  • Available to eligible employees with 50 years of age with 10 years of service regardless of which retirement plan that they are part of  - includes NYS Teachers Retirement System, NYS Employees Retirement System, and optional retirement plan
  • Time frame set by OCC Board of Trustees for Oct. 3 – Dec. 31, 2010
  • College targeted only full time professors, academic rank – only employee group that allowed them to realize the 50% savings requirement under the legislation
  • Very small group; 41 employees; anticipated that 10% – 25% will take advantage of the incentive
  • $500/year – additional incentive the college has added; working as a college professor is great job and there is very, very low turnover – felt the additional incentive needed to be added
  • Funding for the $500/year additional incentive will come out of the college’s operating budget
  • The $500 incentive was arrived at through a calculation by working with the college comptroller, looking at what the savings would be, and what would actually be paid out.  It is similar to what is in the current union contract – has a $500 benefit.
  • Cost is projected to be $200,000 - $300,000 for the extra incentive

 

Mr. Buckel was concerned about the quality of teaching if losing full time professors in the midst of the enrollment explosion, net 6-8 professors added in the last 2 years and almost 100 adjuncts.  Wants to make sure that the strength of teaching is enhanced over time.  Dr. Sydow said that the quality of instruction is what the reputation of OCC is built upon.  It is a top priority for her, trustees, and institution – don’t get to be the number one college of choice by schools such as Fayetteville Manlius, by compromising quality.  The college makes every effort in the hiring process in every step to the investment in professional development.  The college has a dual mission – preparing students to transfer on to 4-year college and university and also have about 40% of students preparing to go directly into the work force.  It is deceiving to look at 100 adjunct hires to think that they are somehow not on par.  Those individuals are bringing the experience, the immediacy of a world that is very rapidly changing in technologies, manufacturing, etc.  She values the adjuncts, and in many cases wants an adjunct in front of a class because someone who has been in academia for 20 -30 years may not be in the best position to teach students.  An analysis has been done; are not running the risk of depleting quality of instruction by offering this incentive.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Kilmartin, seconded by Mr. Holmquist to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

8.     PERSONNEL:  Peter Troiano, Commissioner

        a.     Authorize Advance Step Hire for RP 01 107111000 003 9863, Administrative Intern, Grade 29 Step G at $45,560 effective August 7, 2010

  • Traditionally administrative interns were hired at a step G, prior to recent legislation limiting advance step hiring
  • Admin Intern program has been successful at capturing very bright, successful, capable individuals at masters degree level, predominately from SU Maxwell School
  • 6 interns at present time – allocated thought the County.  DMB uses them a lot; has replaced employees which have left with admin interns, all paid at step G, with the exception of the last person who came in after the recent legislation was passed – want to get him on par with the other admin. interns
  • This is a single request
  • Admin. Interns are hired on an 18 mos. basis; allows plenty of time for them to be evaluated.  They are subject to a test for a budget analyst position and hopefully score within the top 3

 

In answer to Chairman Jordan, Mr. Rowley indicated that there is difficulty attracting for these positions.  Feelers are put out to LeMoyne and SU and there wasn’t a plethora of people coming forward for these positions.  These are graduates that come to the county with masters degrees.

 

In answer to Mr. Warner, Mr. Rowley said that the different between step B and step G would be around $3,000; a G step is $45,560, a step B would be $42,350.  Mr. Warner noted that the legislation was put into place for a reason – it has slowed down some of the advance step hires. He feels that $42,350 is not bad pay for someone’s first day out of college.  Mr. Troiano answered that they need a masters degree in hand; they are full time staff; they get an 18-month appointment.

 

Mr. Rowley said that the individual was working part time on the 103 while finishing up his degree, prior to the recent legislation being passed.  He was aware at the time he started that step G was the norm.  Mr. Troiano said that the advance step puts the County in a position to be competitive for the individuals of this caliber.  Mr. Warner said that he doesn’t see that $3,000 will make a difference as to whether someone will take the job or not.

 

Mr. Corbett agrees that the legislation was put into effect for a reason.  This is a single case; he understands that the individual has been in place and interacting with others that were receiving the salary that existed prior to the legislation.  He had anticipated getting the same type of pay; he is doing the exact same work.  If another Maxwell graduate were to come in 10 days from now, this wouldn’t be appropriate.

 

AYES:  5 (Jordan, Corbett, Holmquist, Kilmartin, Buckel); NOES:  1 (Warner).  MOTION CARRIED.

 

9.     WEP:

        a.       A Local Law Establishing a Program to Promote Capacity Management, Maintenance and Operation of the Public Sewers and Related Purposes, and to Repeal Local Law No. 13 of 1989

Mr. Corbett noted that this would be moved to September.  A public meeting will be held to provide more information and hear public comment.

 

        b.      Authorizing the County of Onondaga to Enter into an Agreement with the City of Syracuse to Provide a Grant for Funding of Green Infrastructure for the Connective Corridor and Forman Park Improvement Projects ($168,000)

  • Provide green infrastructure in connective corridor and in Forman Park
  • Total cost is $168,000 – includes $50,000 for construction of green infrastructure in Forman Park; $118,000 for design of green infrastructure for the connective corridor
  • Connective Corridor – project between SU and City of Syracuse – greening of that project would result in about 10 million gallons of capture annually, about .3% of the 7% required for green infrastructure

In answer to Chairman Jordan, Ms. Pastella clarified that this would be 10 million that would not run into Onondaga Creek--not 10 million gallons that would have to be treated.  It is part of the consent order – required to capture runoff and prevent CSOs.  Regarding savings - green infrastructure is roughly a savings of $.20 to $.30 per gallon capture.  Gray infrastructure is $.40 - $.50 per gallon.  Mr. Corbett said that wherever we can capture, it is credited for the county’s capture rate.  By joining with the City on this, it helps the County with its capture rate.

 

Chairman Rhinehart said that this is a City park and asked if technically the City should be doing this.  Ms. Pastella said that they are – there are retention basins being installed, not just planting trees; $50,000 is not a lot of money to green a park.  It is taking something that is already somewhat permeable and making the retention to capture. 

 

Regarding the grant for $160,000 – Mr. Kilmartin asked about the obligation to the grant.  Ms. Pastella said that in the court order there are specific percentages that have to be captured by green infrastructure.  This project goes towards compliance with the court order.  Regarding the grant, Mrs. Tarolli said that Comptroller would require an invoice and reimbursement provided – to make sure there is control over the expenditures.  Mr. Kilmartin asked if this is more of a discretionary grant or a grant that will help satisfy an obligation of the court.  Ms. Dougherty said that the discretionary part is that the County is required to capture percentages – using the most economical and best methods to incorporate that so that the County ends up hitting its target.

 

Chairman Jordan questioned, that assuming this project was implemented, where will it bring us in our goal of 6.7%.  Mrs. Pastella said that she does not have a total on all of the projects done so far – are just kicking things off and really at the beginning of the green projects.  Chairman Jordan questioned if we are close to achieving the goal of 6.7% capture; with the projects approved so far, together with this project, there must be ability to project where we are with the capture goal.  Ms. Pastella can provide the numbers of what has been done and approved so far.  If they exceed what is needed by 2013, ultimately 6.7%, if ahead of the game for capture, that is great – then it won’t have to be done later on.  Any project that they can take advantage of and put green into, will help meet the goal.

 

Mr. Buckel said that the original ACJ provided for a great deal of costly, highly engineered facilities.  The new administration, with the legislature consent, wanted to shift to a more green, natural and hopefully less expensive solution.  It was presented to the court, which approved it.  The court asked some of the same questions – if it can be achieved and said they would monitor it.  He feels that we would be remiss to not do one piece of a larger puzzle that would ultimately save a lot of money.  Mr. Corbett noted that when the ACJ was originally done, an underlying theme was that when new technologies were developed that the County would look at them.  When this first started, gray technology was at the forefront of how to capture what the county was legally obligated to do.  As the new administration came in, the technologies and the ways to capture were changing quickly.  They looked at how to attempt this and the mindset changed at the same time.  A year and half to 2 years from now there may be something else that comes up.  To look at a 10,000 gallon capture rate for somethng that is not pipes and digging up a whole street, to capture 3 million gallons, it justifies why the County made the change.  There will be a lot of these projects that come up.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Buckel to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        c.       Appropriating $8,383,140 of the Proceeds of the Bonds Authorized to be Issued Pursuant to Bond Resolution No. 231, dated September 7, 1999, to Provide Funds for Engineering, Construction and Other Related Expenses of the Clinton Street Conveyances and Regional Treatment Facility Project ($8,383,140)

  • Previously authorized money for Clinton CSO Abatement project (originally RTF) – money used for engineering and construction of projects related to it.
  • Required by ACJ
  • Clinton project was appropriated in small pieces
  • A portion of these monies will be used for implementing green technology

 

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett to approve this item, seconded by Mr. Buckel.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        d.      Authorizing the County Executive to enter into an Agreement with the City of Syracuse to Share in the Cost of Funding and Arborist to be Employed by the City ($37,500)

  • Arborist would be employed by the City; 50% cost sharing of salaries and benefits not to exceed $37,500
  • Term for 5 years
  • Purpose of arborist – Save the Rain Program will plant a lot of trees in the city – arborist is critical to managing those trees, recommending species, pruning techniques, how and where they should be planted, making sure trees are viable and help meet capture requirements

 

Chairman Jordan questioned if those services would be part of the RFP with the contract.  Ms. Pastella said that there would be a determination of the types of trees and design for planting – which is where the arborist would have input.  It is not something that would be left up to the contractor.  The contractor would have plant the type of tree that is in the spec, warranty it for a year, and then the arborist would make sure it was viable.  Chairman Jordan questioned why it wouldn’t be part of the RFP.  Ms. Dougherty said that the County needs to designate the type of green and what type of projects it is looking for – otherwise it would be all over the board if left up to the contractor.  The County is required to provide maintenance for green as part of the ACJ, which would be part of the duties of the arborist.  Mr. Corbett added that the arborist can also be used for DOT and Parks projects.

 

In answer to Mr. Holmquist, Ms. Pastella said that this is a new person for a position.  The City used to have an arborist, but the person left.  The 5-yr period was just to get the program going. At this point the County’s obligation ends at 5 years.

 

Chairman Jordan said that his concern is that the County is talking about laying someone off; this is spending money that could otherwise be used to keep a County employee from being laid off – it is a question of want and need.  Ms. Dougherty said that if we have a person who is a specialist vs. paying someone every time there is a project for every bush and tree that is planted, then in the long run this is a cost savings.

 

Mr. Holmquist said that there are local professional companies that would be able to provide expert services -- was an RFP done to let them know there is a goal that we have and see if they are capable of providing this type of service for a 5 year period.  Ms. Pastella said they did not RFP for and arborist; at this point they would have to put it out on an hourly rate.  It is not known how many trees will be planted at this time or what the scope is.

 

Chairman Jordan asked if the agreement includes the time allocation.  Ms. Dougherty said that everything that will be done is within the City limits, other than if other County departments wanted to utilize the arborist.  It is a County obligation through the ACJ to not only have green, but to maintain it.  There is no time allocation in the agreement.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Buckel to approve this item.  AYES:  4 (Corbett, Kilmartin, Warner, Buckel); NOES:  2 (Holmquist, Jordan); MOTION CARRIED.

 

10.   WAYS & MEANS MISC.:

        a.     Accept the Gift of a Replica of the “122nd> NY” Flag Without Condition (Sponsored by Mr. Meyer)

  • Project over 10 years old; received special award form OHA
  • Committee still works with OHA
  • Original project was to restore 10 Civil War flag, which are County property
  • Worked with Oakwood and Liverpool Cemeteries to restore monuments
  • County Clerk takes documents and history to community events
  • This flag replica was made by the historian of the Town of Onondaga; original flag was made by Ladies of Fayetteville
  • Financing from 122nd New York State Volunteers

 

A motion was made by Mr. Warner, seconded by Mr. Corbett to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Adopting a Revised Salary Benefit Schedule with Respect to County Employees Not Represented By a Bargaining Unit, Removing the Authority of the County Executive to Hire at an Advanced Step B, and Further Amending Resolutions No. 231-2000 as amended by Resolution Nos. 78-2001, 135-2006, 235-2008, 217-2009 and 122-2010 (Sponsored by Mr. Lesniak)

 

Chairman Rhinehart introduced the resolution on behalf of Mr. Lesniak, who could not be present today.  Mr. Lesniak has put a tremendous amount of work into this proposal and has worked with the County Executive’s office.

  • Revised salary schedule for MCs
  • Removes existing advance step authority to step B from the County Executive
  • MCs have been left out twice in the last several years from salary increases; have received steps but not always a raise in salary
  • Current MC salary schedule has not kept pace with what has gone on in the real world; this proposal is an attempt to fix it
  • 2 year process – starting Jan. 1, 2011, every 3 months MCs would receive 1.25% increase
  • At end of 2012, the first 6 steps will be eliminated from the current schedule; resulting in a 21 step schedule instead of 27 steps; after the 2 year, period step G will become step A
  • Total impact over 2 years is over $1.5 million.

 

Chairman Jordan said that he does not intend to ask for a vote today.  This has quite a financial impact and the information was really just received today; it warrants full consideration before taking a vote.  As it was considered today, it can go to the floor for a vote at session.

 

Mr. Warner asked at the end of the proposal, how will MCs be compared to union employees.  Mr. Troiano said that they will still lag to a degree, but not to the extent they are not.  There will still be a problem at the bottom of the schedule wherein promotions from bargaining titles go to management titles.  Most bargaining units have negotiated raises between 3% - 4%; this proposal will be slightly behind that.  It is difficult to say how far behind they will be, depend on which unit, who is getting promoted, the particular title, where they currently are in their title.  CSEA rate from 2009 – 2012 is about 9.5%; the wage growth in this proposal is about 7%.

 

In answer to Mr. Holmquist, Mr. Troiano said that they will re-letter the steps at the end of the two year period.

 

        c.     Amending the Vacation Leave Schedule for County Employees Not Represented by a Bargaining Unit (Sponsored by Mr. Lesniak)

  • Ability for new MC employees to use accrued vacation time in initial year of hire

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett, seconded by Mr. Holmquist to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; CARRIED.

 

          d.     A Local Law Amending the Onon. Co. Charter and Admin. Code to Reduce the Number of Co. Legislators and the Number of Co. Legislative Districts from Nineteen to Eleven (Sponsored by Mr. Buckel)

Pulled by sponsor.

          e.     A Local Law Amending the Onon. Co. Charter and Admin. Code to Reduce the Number of Co. Legislators and the Number of County Legislative Districts from Nineteen to Thirteen (Sponsored by Mr. Buckel)

Pulled by sponsor.

 

11.   LAW DEPARTMENT:

        a.     Settlement of Claim

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett to enter into executive session for the purpose of discussing pending litigation in the matter of Novak v. Onondaga County and Onondaga County Sheriff’s Department, seconded by Mr. Warner.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Corbett to exit executive session and enter regular session, seconded by Mr. Buckel.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

A resolution entitled, Authorizing the Settlement of the Supreme Court Action of Amy Novak V. County of Onondaga, Onondaga County Sheriff’s Department, Peter N. LaValle and Farm Bureau Insurance Company, was introduced.  A motion as made by Mr. Corbett to approve this item; seconded by Mr. Warner.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:07 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted, 

 

DEBORAH L. MATURO, Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

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