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Meeting Minutes Return to Committee
Meeting Minutes
Office of the Onondaga County Legislature
Court House, Room 407 * 401 Montgomery Street * Syracuse, New York 13202
(315) 435-2070 Fax: (315) 435-8434

DEBORAH L. MATURO
Clerk
DAVID H. KNAPP
Chairman
KATHERINE FRENCH
Deputy Clerk

 

 

COUNTY FACILITIES COMMITTEE MINUTES – NOVEMBER 13, 2019

JUDITH A. TASSONE, CHAIR

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Ms. Cody, Mr. McBride, *Mrs. Ervin

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Holmquist

ALSO ATTENDING:  Chairman Knapp, Mr. Jordan; See attached list

 

Chair Tassone called the meeting to order at 10:34 a.m.  A motion was made by Mr. McBride, seconded by Ms. Cody to waive the reading and approve the minutes of the previous committee meeting.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     FACILITIES MANAGEMENT:  Archie Wixson, Commissioner

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Capital Improvements at Various Facilities in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $1,500,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $1,500,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($1,500,000)

  • Refill account used for various capital improvements for County properties; anything from structural issue to HVAC
  • Department renovation (i.e.) Civic Center - next vacant floor
  • Majority of projects are around $500,000 each over the next year
  • Calculated number - understand to maintain and protect assets, need to make investment every year before deterioration happens and need a large amount
  • Fund for various projects; prevents having to come back to the Legislature for each thing
  • $1.5 mil – ask for last 4 years; in 2011 came to Legislature for $21 mil causing debt load; should have been investing every year into buildings; this is the plan for asset protection; amount has worked well for roofs, renovating floors, etc.
  • Building security assessment; results likely to say they need to invest to make the building more secure

        b.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Rehabilitation of the Carnegie Library in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $2,365,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $2,015,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($2,015,000)

  • Investment into rehabilitation of Carnegie Library - funds asking for this year are only funds to accomplish work in progressive rehab in 2020; expect to come back next year to release rest of funds and ask for $1.7 mil for 2021
  • Occupy building with some shared programming - Economic Development, Community Development, SOCPA
  • Working on scenarios; conceptual designs for all versions
  • Executive Office working on determining who will be first occupant of building when renovated
  • In good sound shape ; needs cosmetic improvements; some roof leaks (plaster restoration); flooring from 1994; building vacant since 2011; heating is good, but need better controls for efficiency; very little air conditioning; code improvements
  • Need to supplement fire protection (sprinklers) system – currently only in stairways and exit paths; to occupy, will have to do full system
  • Asbestos abatement; data infrastructure

Chair Tassone stated the Clerk’s office has two rooms in the basement.  Mr. Wixson said they are storing some files in the basement now.  Chair Tassone asked if they will still be able to do that, and Mr. Wixson answered that if it’s not there, they will give them a secure area locally to store them; either in this building or another.  Mr. Wixson said the third floor will be the last thing they will renovate, so they may relocate the files from the basement to the third floor.  The Clerk’s office will be accommodated.

 

*Mrs. Ervin arrived at the meeting.

 

Chair Tassone explained that this year they are approving $2.3 mil, and next year they will come back for more money.  Mr. Wixson commented that it would be great to get occupancy next year, but it’s a lot of work to do.

 

Mr. Wixson replied to Ms. Cody that the City of Syracuse is talking with the Executive’s office about synergies of the cooperative ventures like Community Development and SOCPA; possibly even their codes office.

 

        c.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing HVAC Renovations at the Courthouse in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $1,000,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $1,000,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($1,000,000)

  • HVAC investment in the Court House; comfort levels not perfect; do good job maintaining; not without heat or cooling
  • Not quite complete with HVAC design; in depth study done 10 years ago; been doing more specific design of what needs to be accomplished; will start with perimeter induction units and controls of building
  • $1 mil enough to get started; long term investment that will incrementally increase each year moving forward; next year the ask will be $2 mil, the following year $3 mil; over 5 years it will be a $10 mil investment
  • 110 year old building; last time HVAC was updated was about 50 – 60 years ago
  • Will do the best they can; not a perfect building, but it is efficient; when heating up, it stays warm and same with cooling
  • Cannot stop leaks anymore; blockages are in lines; have not solved the issue

        d.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing LED Lighting Upgrades in Various Buildings in the Downtown Campus in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $535,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $444,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($444,000)

  • LED lighting upgrades around facilities - Justice Center, Convention Center & Garage and Everson parking garage
  • Replace existing lighting with newer and more efficient LED fixtures; calculated Nat Grid incentives, NYSERDA rebates and efficiency upgrades, which defrayed some costs ($90,000) – originally projected $535,000
  • 2 buildings have 3 year energy payback - reduction of energy usage bills will pay back investment; other is 6 year pay back; returns on investment less than 8 years is a good ROI
  • Maintenance savings - LED light bulbs/fixtures last longer than fluorescents and incandescents; life span ~ 4-5 years; would not change the ROI (just bill, not maintenance)

        e.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Downtown Steam Plant Improvements in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $700,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $700,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($700,000)

  • Improvements at Steam Plant are needed in boilers and chillers, including new controls in both
  • Other investment is converting 2 generator chillers to direct grid power chillers
  • 6 chillers in building; 2 of 6 taken off grid and run by natural gas generator - generators reached end of life and died out; does not make sense to reinvest in generators, because cost of electricity down (historically low and staying steady)
  • Will have those 2 additional chillers for chilling water to cool buildings when taking others offline for maintenance
  • Right now have to pause maintenance, because chillers get overwhelmed; cannot take offline
  • 2 boilers have issues that need to be addressed, including a safety issue – leak in high temperature boiler
  • Look to invest in boilers before investing in chillers and cooling towers on roof
  • $700,000 will not cover everything, but for everything they need this upcoming year (2020)

Mr. Wixson explained to Mrs. Ervin that they can replace boilers, but it is 2.5 to 3 times as much as rehabilitating them.  A rehabilitated boiler would have a normal useful lifespan of 20 years.

 

Chair Tassone asked if the generators are being replaced.  Mr. Wixson responded that they will abandon them, and they do not generate power for anything but the chillers.

 

Mr. Wixson answered Chair Tassone that the cooling tower drain pans are rotting, so they are losing a lot of water.  The coils are getting pinholes, and they are treating the water to fix it, but it’s not perfect.  They are older cooling towers, so they need to do some rehabilitation to get more life.  Chair Tassone asked if they are being replaced.  Mr. Wixson said they are not replacing them with this ask.  The time to do the cooling tower is before the month of May.  The boilers are first, then cooling towers and chillers.

 

2.     PARKS AND RECREATION:  William Lansley, Commissioner

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Various Improvements to Parks and Recreation Areas in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $7,411,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $7,411,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($7,411,000)

 

Beaver Lake Nature Center boardwalk replacement

  • Hand built in late 1970’s; additions in 1987; boardwalk built in bog and swamp along mud lake; past several years been sinking with water rising; had pallet structures with carpeted sections for safety
  • One small section was replaced with material design looking to use for this section - pounded wide bottom beams in, which compacts muddy surface into support column
  • Need to design - move system further from lake with rising water; 3 sections at 2,500’ long
  • #1 safety issue - outstanding Friends group; 350,000 people go there annually; 3 miles of Loop the Lake is there, but lot of times have to close because of sunken rails
  • $1,835,000 quote for design and installation of replacement
  • For years and years, had budget to replace boards, but at a point that it needs to be rebuilt
  • Lifespan – got 40 years out of this last boardwalk, which was hand piled telephone poles; all hand built
  • There will be disruption at the park - will have to use existing boardwalk to create new boardwalks; will go to center, then work back; not full width, so they cannot use full size vehicles; lengthy process; 1 year to replace

Hopkins Road Softball Park

  • 2009 had RFP for public/private partnership - Ron Baum took control of softball; County saved over $100,000 per year; County is responsible for park and infrastructure; Ron Baum runs sports, activities and tournaments
  • Looking to do project; budget ask is $2 mil for 2020-2021
  • Spring last year had 35-40 days of rain; because of extreme wetness, it impacted access; recommending replacing one infield with artificial turf including drainage; can have games when season opens
  • Fences original to park – replacing some posts and all fabric on chain-link
  • Field lights deteriorating - post rotted to point that tower fell from high winds; rusted out at base
  • Scoreboard functional, but dated; face panel ripped off in wind
  • Concession stand – fire in 2018; arsonist did in middle of night; repaired, but needs replacement
  • Currently no dug out canopies for sun protection and rain
  • Storage building needs rehabilitation – exterior is T1-11 paneling that is rotted and bowing out
  • Parking lot repaving – extensive parking lot with 2-3 sections
  • Artificial turf is for the infield; drainage to outfield; may do entire field; original quote $470,000 to do entire field in turf; either do multiple infields, or one large field; will leave that decision to experts

Long Branch Park

  • Replaced many shelters with new steel structures; #1 rented facility in parks system
  • Scottish games or festivals – every weekend festivals take over park
  • Looking to replace structures including the office, restrooms and shelters; office not used in past 5 years, deemed unsafe and rotted; restroom original to 1940’s or 1950’s, expand it to accommodate use of park
  • Parking lot – deplorable; space to double size towards the river; overflow parking only when there is no rain

Oneida Shores Boat Launch and Pay Gate

  • Pay gate takes away need to have people in ticket booths collecting fees; auto gate makes sense – fishing starts at 4:30 or 5 a.m.; staff there for that duration does not make sense
  • Launch remodeled prior to 2009; stone structure with precast concrete panels approximately 6’ x 6’ with rebar section
  • People with much larger boats were power loading - back in trailer and use engine power to push boat onto trailer, instead of hand crank; creating water column to go over top and under back end of panels
  • Panels shifted, so not flat surface; created risk hazard with tires that cannot get in or out, because corner of panels
  • New design - pour concrete pad to accommodate larger boats; put large dam in water; build new launch and retaining wall, then let water back into launch
  • Pretty much designed; best system brought forward; day and night from what exists currently
  • Anticipate construction in fall 2020, when kids go back to school; after all tournaments in spring and fishing season
  • Pay gate – revenue will be more than currently getting; ticket booth runs beach and other things; at times will need someone there to move traffic faster
  • Onondaga Lake Park (OLP) had honor box, but revenues went from $25 to $300 with a pay gate

Various Projects for Parks

  • Loomis Hill Cemetery – low spot with graves can have standing water; pipe drains water between Loomis Hill Cemetery and Veterans Cemetery (does not flood); creek running from property to back; elevation just above water getting over; design to dig trench deeper to get over high spot; drain to back of property
  • Harris Road - same system of water running from high spot into park; do retaining ditch to hold water; dig trench to go past high spot on Harris Road
  • $210,000 for both projects
  • OLP near marina – own a pipe that goes into village from Brow Street; broke 3x in last 2 years - will dig out hole and do directional drilling over to marinara area; also put in fire hydrant
  • Highland Forest and Pratts Falls – outdated gasoline and fuel tanks; currently single wall tanks, but replacing with double wall tanks; some tanks still use hand pumps, so replacing those with electrical pumps
  • Jamesville Beach – 200 year old hot water heater
  • Rosamond Gifford Zoo – failing cooling tower
  • Beaver Lake has 2 oil boilers ready to fail – look to replace both with propane efficient boilers
  • Zoo – retrofit lighting sytems; old Victorians around pond have white globes they cannot buy anymore; also in primate wing have original lighting systems from 1984; replace with LED fixtures
  • Arrowhead Lodge – add solar power lighting; as well as parking near the lodge
  • Beaver Lake - large overflow parking will have solar poles for safety in the evening
  • Zoo – engineering study on water analysis; make sure there are no leaks; square with efficiency and mechanicals
  • OLP – sewer pump building on concrete pad; elevated to avoid flooding; building deteriorating; needs to be rebuilt
  • Beaver Lake - barn on north side deteriorating; replace with metal storage building; add metal garage for equipment
  • Visitors Center – replace windows around facility, offices and community room; paneling original to community room
  • Zoo – contact barn roof is leaking severely
  • Several fencing projects – Zoo has a lot including Penguin and Tiger area stockade fencing
  • OLP Wegmans Good Dog park – fencing fabric in need of replacement
  • Highland Forest, Pratts Falls and Ska nonh – replacement for access control gates; built in wood in 1960’s; will be steel mechanical gates
  • OLP and Long Branch Park playgrounds – redo the surfacing and add play structures
  • Sawmill Creek restroom – lawnmower fire took down the restroom; $400,000 to replace
  • Loomis Hill – repair and apply stone dust to internal roads
  • Zoo – miscellaneous projects including tripping hazards
  • Total of projects is $2.256 mil

3.     LIBRARY:  Dawn Marmor, Interim Director

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Purchase of a Bookmobile in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $260,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $260,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($260,000)

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  • Last time Library had a Bookmobile was in 1993
  • Bookmobile will have materials available to check out for all ages, WiFi capability, lap tops and iPads
  • Goals and responsibilities of public library system is to provide equitable access to information to all areas
  • Some communities have difficult time getting to brick and mortar building; Bookmobile will allow Library to get around to all places - nursery schools, senior centers, community events and schools
  • Can provide materials and engage in programing at sites they are visiting
  • Bookmobile – materials can move into locations like nursing homes for those with limited mobility; bookshelves can be wheeled off into the sites
  • Story telling available, some instruction and helping those with technology needs
  • CDL not needed - staffed by librarian (driver) and part time clerk; another librarian will trade off duties
  • Plan to have it on the road at least 5 days a week
  • 12 month waiting period from time Bookmobile is ordered to delivery
  • 2 people involved with Bookmobile; librarian (driver) and part time staff member; behind scenes is scheduling and outreach; there will be a Supervisor at library to coordinate stops and visits; other librarian will trade off when needed

Chair Tassone asked if they will be looking to hire someone in the future.  Ms. Marmor responded yes; at least one position.  It is a minimum of a year away, and staffing in the branches can change overtime.  There is a possibility of reassigning a staff member to help out on the Bookmobile.

 

Mr. McBride asked where it will be located, and Ms. Marmor replied that it will be parked in the loading dock area of the Galleries. 

 

Mr. McBride wanted to know if there is funding for the maintenance and gas.  Ms. Marmor explained that it will be minimal maintenance the first year.  They will be asking for an increase in the materials budget by $5,000 to $10,000 when it goes into operation, because they will need sufficient materials on board.  Gas and maintenance is impossible to tell, but compared to other models, the average yearly cost including staffing is anticipated to be close to $100,000.

 

Ms. Cody asked if other counties have them, and Ms. Marmor said they do.  There should be state aid money available for this.  The Buffalo library system invested in one for $262,000 that is staffed more heavily, and their average yearly costs run $200,000.  

 

Mrs. Ervin requested a layout of what the annual costs will be.  Ms. Marmor said they will do that.

 

4.     TRANSPORTATION:  Martin Voss, Commissioner

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing DOT Facilities Improvements in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $1,000,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $1,000,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($1,000,000)

 

Mr. Voss gave the following handout to the Assistant Clerk:

 

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Chair Tassone asked how Mr. Voss handled the first storm, and Mr. Voss responded that they have good people, good mechanics and ten new pieces of equipment.  Chairman Knapp asked if the old plows are worth anything, and Mr. Voss replied they go to auction.  Some are kept for parts, and the ones sold at auction are most likely bought for parts.  A couple spares that still run are kept in case of emergency.

 

Mr. Voss:

  • CIP focuses on borrowing for roadwork, paving and bridges; budget in fall, work plan in March or April
  • Identified needs that are not highway or bridge related; approached Executive branch to find out how to react; do not want to let things deteriorate to the point of needing a new building; expensive, time consuming and disruptive
  • Transportation needs buildings that keep equipment and people warm
  • Deputy Commissioner Mr. Dyer will be in charge of the CIP projects – did list and evaluations; will be doing project management versus outsourcing to Facilities; also design and evaluation
  • Asking for bonding to support capital acquisitions of materials and supplies
  • A lot can be done with Transportation employees in summer; (i.e.) salt shed project – bought and built; did fantastic job
  • Leverage Mr. Dyer’s experience with building facilities and in-house crews building
  • Everything for this is restricted to the Jamesville and Marcellus shops

Marcellus

  • ~30-35 years old; in usable shape, but have to do things to keep it this way for another 10-15 years
  • Gutters and heat trays – heat trays get ice and water off roof; run along seams of gutters to spouts to generate heat; keeps water from freezing; keeps weight off roof
  • Siding, roof, fuel pump needs work, doors and frames (winter months get salt and rot)
  • Overhead doors in shop bays – when door opens and breaks, then they lose heat; breaks in closed position and stuck
  • Floor drains – each shop has drains along spine to take water and ice out of building; when blocked, water backs up in shop and creates a “lake”; ongoing problem, and have maintained, but broken; need to replace
  • HVAC and concrete apron
  • Card readers at both Marcellus and Jamesville need to be upgraded – not to current standard
  • Ceiling tiles and parking lot repaving (been almost 20 years)

Jamesville

  • Gutters, block wall repair, overhead doors, entrance doors, drains, wash bay heater to replace (need hot water to wash plows to get salt off and maintain life cycle of trucks) and card readers
  • Idea for cost avoidance; do now with expertise and work force to avoid taking on bigger capital projects down road
  • Prudent way to accomplish this and get facilities where need to be in the long term

Mr. Dyer stated that the total is $1,300,000, and they can do this for $1 million total to be split between the two.  Mrs. Ervin asked if it is $500,000 each.  Mr. Voss said it’s a little more for Marcellus at about a 60/40 split.  With Mr. Dyer’s experience in building pump stations and sewage treatment plants, he can design these things.  The department has a really good masonry crew they can use for their own needs, which saves on going out to bid.  Technical work like HVAC will have to be done by County vendors.  Chair Tassone said it’s great they can do their own design work, and Mr. Voss agreed.  Transportation’s number one asset is their people, then trucks and third are the buildings (need them in decent shape and to be efficient).

 

Chairman Knapp asked what the latest is on the North Area facility, and Mr. Voss responded:

  • Lot of obstacles with rebuilding onsite; looking at rebuilding at alternative site, but site identified as all wetland
  • Looking at what to do with appropriation approved; do not want to have to come back for bigger ask
  • Working on what to do to get building adequate to last 15-20 years; includes roof, LED lighting, improvements inside for employee areas and plumbing
  • Some tenants are out – (i.e.) County Clerk removed their items, so that space is available
  • Will hopefully present to Executive Office before Thanksgiving
  • Probably will not tear down north area to rebuild; not affordable; do not think it would make sense long term
  • Currently roof is leaking; main door broke a month ago (only have 2 doors); LED lighting; heat
  • Contractor working on HVAC will start next week; want functioning building that’s warm and dry with bathrooms, showers
  • Very difficult to find land in the area that is suitable for development
  • Have plan and expertise in house for design and evaluation; less expensive versus paying firm to design

The meeting was adjourned at 11:54 a.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

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JAMIE McNAMARA, Assistant Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

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* * *

 

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION COMMITTEE MINUTES – NOVEMBER 13, 2019

CASEY E. JORDAN, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:   Mrs. Tassone, Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, Dr. Chase

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Bottrill

ALSO ATTENDING:  Chairman Knapp; see attached list

 

Chairman Jordan called the meeting to order at 12:04 p.m.  A motion was made by Dr. Chase, seconded by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, to waive the reading of the proceedings from the previous committee.  MOTION CARRIED.  A motion was made by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, seconded by Dr. Chase, to approve the minutes of the previous committee meeting.  MOTION CARRIED. 

       

1.     OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTTravis Glazier, Director

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Ash Tree Management in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $600,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $600,000 Bonds of said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($600,000)

 

Mr. Glazier:

  • Continuation of the Ash Tree Management Plan, amount decreased from previous years
  • 16,000 trees will be removed by years end, target of 44,000, over 1/3 through with only 3 years of full funding; 399 trees preserved, targeted 2,300; 2,000 trees planted - about ½
  • SWCD currently burns $600,000 to $700,000 annually based on the number of service providers, management and timeframe, cutting limited to the Indiana Bat season of November 1 to March 1; does an outstanding job, pinching every penny, preservation costs lowered by licensed staff member directly administering insecticide, vendor competition reduced removal costs
  • Tree removal timeframe likely to be shorter and less expensive than anticipated, program will remain in CIP for 25 years, inoculation needs to continue
  • Anticipate amounts decreasing, cautiously believe this will continue unless there is a major market change

Chairman Jordan stated that he would rather pay cash than bond for $600,000. 

 

In answer to Mrs. Tassone, Mr. Glazier said that 10% of the trees are planned for replacement and over 2,000 have been replaced.  Much has been subsidized with grants, which is another reason why the costs have been less than anticipated.  Parks and public areas are receiving the replacements.

 

Dr. Chase questioned what needs to happen in order to pay cash.  Chairman Jordan said that they don’t necessarily have to bond if approved.  If cash is the legislature’s wish a resolution could direct cash payment instead of bonding.  Mr. Glazier noted that it was the legislature’s directive to review this on an annual basis as a capital investment. 

 

In answer to Chairman Jordan, Mr. Glazier said that the wasps were never going to be able to deal with the glut of the emerald ash borer (EAB).  The idea was that the wasps could provide some management once the population peak collapses to a manageable volume with some combination of insecticide, preventative maintenance and distribution of ash tree locations.  Because ash trees are so disbursed throughout our community there isn’t a practical way to manage them. 

 

Chairman Jordan stated that it is more of a maintenance measure.  Mr. Glazier agreed, adding that a lot of approval needs to go along with this.  There would be many reviews and his understanding is that ESF continues to work on it but there is no clear sightline as to when that would be.  Chairman Jordan cautioned that we don’t want to replace an EAB problem with a wasp problem. 

 

Mrs. Abbott-Kenan gave a shout out to Ms. Paice from SWCD for her work in educating the public on what is happening.  Mr. Glazier said that the trees are tagged with information.  Mrs. Abbott-Kenan said that their partnerships have been a lifeline to a lot of towns.  Mr. Glazier said the entire team is good and the partnership has worked out better than anticipated.

 

2.     WATER ENVIRONMENT PROTECTIONFrank Mento, P.E., Commissioner; Michael Lannon, P.E., Deputy Commissioner; Adam Woodburn, Project Coordinator Stormwater Management; Jed Walsh, Project Coordinator

         a.     INFORMATIONAL - A Resolution Approving the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Baldwinsville Treatment Plant within the Onondaga County Sanitary District

         b.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of an Additional $31,280,200 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Baldwinsville Treatment Plant in and for the Onondaga County Sanitary District ($31,280,200)

 

Mr. Mento:

  • Large CIP project extensively reviewed last month, a long time to get to this point, ready to bond and put into the CIP construction program
  • Item 2a is the project information resolution, item 2b is the bond resolution

         c.     INFORMATIONAL - A Resolution Approving Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District Consisting of the CSO 029 Walton Street Abatement Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York

         d.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of $2,020,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay Costs of Certain Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District in and for said County ($2,020,000)

  • Items 2c and 2d much the same; Walton Street, City of Syracuse project
  • Also discussed at the last meeting; must coordinate efforts with the city

 

         e.     INFORMATIONAL: ACJ Quarterly Report (July – September 2019)

 

Mr. Walsh:

  • Very productive quarter, includes lots of construction; Harbor Brook Green Streets were are a large percentage, significant progress was made in the area immediately around Fowler, Wilbur Ave., and Magnolia, also Lakeview Ave., Richmond Ave, Fairfield Ave., Hutchinson Ave.; 2 of those projects combined for about 6 million gallons of annual capture
  • Design progressed for the South Salina Green Corridor from East Colvin to East Newell, made a variety of outreach efforts and scheduled meetings for the 4th quarter; various other green streets in 060, 077 also progressed (full list on the first page of the Green Project Update tab)
  • Washington Square Park groundbreaking ceremony well received, good opportunity to demonstrate our relationship with the city; public meetings keep the public informed of the progress
  • Berkeley Drive construction completed in the SU area; nice work by the contractor
  • One application received for the Green Improvement Fund in the 3rd quarter, held meeting to review 2 projects and continued construction on the Near Westside Initiative, Performance Park
  • Construction planned for Factory Direct Furniture and the Northside Learning Center
  • Clean Water Fair received a great response, several hundred people attended
  • Advertising outreach efforts reflected in the 70% uptick in digital reach between 2nd and 3rd quarter
  • Piloted competition of city verse county sewer employees, great fun, county won in a tiebreaker
  • Much more to report in the 4th quarter

Chairman Jordan asked the timeline for finishing the ACJ project.  Mr. Walsh responded that substantial progress was made through the third quarter in putting together the Long Term Control Plan (LTP).  Discussions held during that time with the DEC proved very fruitful and they were very respective to the plan.  More will be reviewed in the 4th quarter but it has been submitted to the DEC and we have an ongoing dialogue with them. 

 

Chairman Jordan asked if they anticipate reaching the end of the agreement by year-end.  Mr. Mento answered that they are trying to expedite the LTP as fast as possible with the DEC because it will form part and parcel of the consent judgment they will enter into with them.  Working in parallel, need a consent order from DEC to take them formally out of the federal lawsuit and part of that consent order with the DEC is the LTP.  The DEC is reviewing this now and when they are finished he will come back to the table.  It has been in their hands for about 30 days and it is a collaborative effort to move this forward.  Mr. Woodburn added that public outreach for public review will be part of the LTP as well.

 

Dr. Chase questioned how they made out with the rain of a few weeks ago that wreaked havoc with the city.  Mr. Mento answered that it was a big storm and almost all treatment plants were near or over capacity for a period of time.  However, the operators were great and able to adjust, even in the middle of the night, to make things work and they were successful.  The Wetzel Road plant lost power due to a tree falling on a transformer but they were able to continue on with generators.  Big dollars are involved in running WEP and their projects to make sure they are safely providing for this community. 

 

3.     ONONDAGA COUNTY RESOURCE RECOVERY AGENCYDereth Glance, Executive Director

        a.     INFORMATIONAL: Budget Overview

 

Ms. Glance:

  • Thanked board member Travis Glazier for attending and distributed Recycling 101 pamphlet, magnet, and Fall 2019 Newsletter
  • The adopted budget holds the solid wastes fee flat; costs have increased 6.5% since 2016, spending $1.8 million to support marketing and processing of recyclables this year, spent over $600,000 in 2017, previous to that had a contract which limited their exposure to $370,000 per year
  • Substantial increase due to 50% loss of the export market; China instituted National Sword which showed how lazy and dirty recycling was in the US, many communities sent fiber to China with upwards of 25% contamination, market prices plummeted because of lose of capacity; some mixed paper going to WV and India
  • The trend for cleaner better-processed materials is not going away; investments in technology are accelerating at an amazing pace, i.e. robotics and optical sort, at a time when the rate of return on investment is very difficult because the export market is not there
  • Government’s role is very important to stabilize the cultivated recycling behavior and connect recycled commodities with economic development in the region; phenomenal logistical hub with the intersection of I-81 and I-90, can continue to divert as much waste as possible into something with a more useful life
  • Costs of construction and demolish debris increased from $52 to $55 per ton
  • Instituting a mattress fee pending today’s vote; challenging to manage, have a lot of them, float if taken to a landfill and are too big to go directly into the wastes to energy plant, must process first; use shredders, recover metals but shredders require a lot of repairs

Dr. Chase asked how the matress fee would be administered.  Ms. Glance responded that it would be the same as if someone brought in a microwave or a refrigerator, they pay a fee for each.  In the City of Syracuse the product is brought to Ley Creek for processing and the fee is paid by the taxpayers through the city’s assessed taxes.

  • Asking legislators to help align economic development goals with the best use of recycling commodities, connecting those dots in a strong circular economy is a great place to focus
  • Also ask for support to expand the bottle bill, glass is very heavy, has a negative value and the value decreases in the blue bin; returned bottles are clean source-separated and can be turned into new bottles or other products, while material returned to the recycling facility is broken, dirty and mixed with a variety of other things, could spend a lot of money to recover something but will never be able to compete with clean streams of glass and know the further up the stream you go the cleaner it will be
  • Finished wastes quantification and characterization study, hope to have a report by the beginning of January – preview, about 40% of the glass in the blue bins is wine bottles, 10% is spirits; by expanding the bottle bill to cover wine and liquor that material could be recovered and turned into new bottles, unable to do this unless it moves up the stream, governor has expressed interest in the expansion
  • No longer able to manage this as municipalities, garbage is managed so that people don’t have dysentery and cholera, have some responsibility to move that material further up the stream; bottle bill is a proven and effective method

Chairman Jordan asked if the proposal would be to add a five-cent deposit on wine and liquor bottles.  Ms. Glance responded that it would be using the bottle bill system so that they could be returned.  It is up for debate as to whether it needs to be brought back to the point of origin; think that having a convenient point of return and increasing the fee to 25-cents on wine and spirits for monetary incentives are all things that could be ironed out.  They are interested in having the responsibility for glass management move further up the stream and the biggest bang for the buck is to make the liquor and wine industry go the same way as beer and soda. 

 

Mrs. Abbott-Kenan asked how many states are doing this.  Ms. Glance answered that she thinks ME but is not entirely sure.  She will provide a spreadsheet on all current bottle bills for each state.   NY’s law has not been updated since 2008 when water bottels were added.

 

Chairman Jordan asked if Onondaga County’s recycled products are of high quality.  Ms. Glance answered that the materials were designed to the spec that the markets wanted but now they want cleaner than it was designed to do.  There is technology that can make it better but that takes investment.  On the other end, most of our cardboard is going to Solvay to turn into new cardboard, most mixed paper is going to WV to be pulped and then made into paper potentially overseas, and meets the spec to move to India.  Recycle America, which is run by Waste Management, operates the material recovery facility for Onondaga County.  The bails could be made cleaner if there was investment in the technology.  The challenge is the rate of return on investment is long for companies who have been upside down for many of their recycling contracts because this has impacted everybody.  They are looking to NYS, i.e. Water Infrastructure Act helped improve investment in needed capital to improve wastewater treatment systems and so there have been some early discussion on what a Solid Wastes Infrastructure Act could do to recognize the need to modernize our wastes infrastructure.  Consider the right role for government and private industry and where we meld those to ensure service to maintain disposal capacity, manage materials in the most local and sustainable way, and that they are living their highest next useful life.  They can do better but right now everything is being recycled.  It is a matter of how they can make the system able to feed more local demand.  It requires investment on the manufacturing end too -  to make sure the quality and consistency is the same or better than virgin and that there is the reliability of the material being available.  It is a matter of aligning supply chains and specs to make sure that they match.  When the markets are low there is great opportunity to

  • Their interest is to move materials in the most economical manner and get environmental benefits; long-term contracts and providing a supply is very important
  • OCRRA is at the end of the stream, doesn’t decide or design what people are going to buy, i.e. move toward e-commerce saw a great increase in boxes, now boxes are made to fit the product and brand identification is being added; want to see extended producer responsibility for products made of a combination of products that their systems are not equipped to manage, moving responsibility further up the steam might change the way packaging is designed, a critical concept, talking to the governor’s office
  • Very nervous about batteries, at some point, the battery dies and it will be their responsibility unless there is some way to manage outside of the municipal solid wastes system, i.e. 6 electric car batteries delivered with c&d, spottier did not see, a fire broke out, fire department and Onondaga Hazmat were called to put the fire out, covered it in sand, took a few days to determine how to stabilize the load consistent with DOT rules, $22,000 bill for 6 batteries; good insight as to the problems that are coming down the line that they aren’t designing but need to be prepared for, would be smart to say the manufacturer is responsible for taking this back and properly managing it
  • Items for the blue bin are newspapers, magazines, catalogs, soft-covered books, envelopes, mail, takeout pizza boxes, broken down cardboard, cans, jars, screw-on lids, plastic bottles and jugs with a neck or handle, and plastic dairy tubs, all kept loose; frozen food boxes and lids that pop off are trash
  • One of the biggest messages is trash goes in a bag, recyclables are kept loose in a bin or tote with a lid; recycling is very important, doing a great job, people are very invested, always working for clarification
  • Rock Cut Road under significant construction, will be in compliance with updated Part 360 DEC regulations, everything indoors in terms of unloading and processing, expect to be fully operational by 2021
  • Newsletter’s centerfold contains annual stack test results for the wastes to energy plant, phenomenal performance, continue to get better with age, almost done with $15 million dollars’ worth of upgrades; improved the type of ammonia used so that nitrous oxide is dipping even more, important for controlling emissions; encourage all to review, very modern facility

Dr. Chase complimented the OCRRA staff for attending any meeting when asked and providing great information.  Ms. Glance said that they are wonderful and thanked Dr. Chase.

 

Chairman Knapp said that OCRRA is similar to WEP, no one seems to care much about them when the stuff is disappearing but when it stops disappearing all of a sudden it is a big deal.  They are a very important piece of the puzzle and even though OCRRA is kind of an independent organization they affect our bond rating so it is very important that they are well run and Ms. Glance does a wonderful job.

 

Chairman Knapp said that the wastes to energy plant is coming up on 25 years old and asked if they would be looking at major upgrades.  Ms. Glance responded that some really significant upgrades were done as a result of the 2015 renewal; $15 million was put into a CIP fund and that is almost done.  Chairman Knapp said that he knew about that but wasn’t sure what the specifics were.  Ms. Glance responded that those are pretty much done and they continue to put a lot of money into routine yearly maintenance; just coming out of a scheduled fall outage, every boiler goes down for a few days and significant work is done yearly so they don’t expect anything outside of what they are paying on an annual basis for the operation and maintenance. 

 

In answer to Chairman Knapp, Ms. Glance said that every 7 years they do a turbine generator outage, which happened last year.  They still process garbage but aren’t generating electricity during that short period of time in which it was refurbished. 

 

Ms. Glance said that Chairman Knapp’s bond rating comment was fantastic.  She wants to remind everyone that their bond rating increased 2 notches for the Rock Cut Road bonding to A+.

 

Chairman Knapp asked the status of the ash and if it was going to Ontario.  Ms. Glance responded that she likes having as many options as possible and has really diversified where they bring things; have a long-range inter-municipal agreement with Madison County and send some stuff there.  Chairman Knapp said that they have a very good operation which is leading edge for a small county.  Ms. Glance agreed, adding that the leader of the Madison County Solid Waste Department was the engineer for OCRRA for about 10 years and the current deputy director was OCRRA’s recycling operations manager for 8 – 10 years.  Also, go to High Acres and Seneca Meadows.

  • Seneca Meadows is set to close in 2025, have to be prepared to make sure there is strategic disposal capacity for NYS, about 30% goes there currently
  • Wastes to energy plant is able to process over 360,000 tons annually and that amount will never change; if they are able to divert things for reuse and wastes reduction they will preserve the disposal capacity for quite some tim
  • 3rd most popular place for Millennials to move; wastes are proof of life, want to preserve capacity for our community to keep growing

In answer to Chairman Knapp, Ms. Glance said that they are at capacity now.  They have some phenomenal metal recovery systems with the wastes to energy plant; recovered 12,000 tons last year and there is also technology to recover more material from the ash called Total Ash Processing Systems.  It is a matter of getting the finer metals below the milliliters they are currently able to extract and expand the rare earth metal recovery as well as getting the other aggregates, i.e. don’t burn concrete or glass but can use again as other types of aggregates in construction applications.  The idea of using advancements to recover more material from the ash is even more important.  The ash is nontoxic and will continue to be of beneficial use for landfill engineering applications.

 

Chairman Knapp said that Ms. Glance has been helpful in discussing the facility and any issues with the Dewitt’s Environmental Conservation Committee.  Due to the nature of the facility, a lot of material blows out of the trucks and he has recruited the Higher Ground program to periodically clean up the trash along the road.  Ms. Glance said that if the I-81 plan goes as she has read there is a great opportunity as Rock Cut Road will be the new front door of the Greater Syracuse/Onondaga County community.  They have an amazing piece of infrastructure that generates a reliable source of electricity and if there was development in that area one may want to think about the power source the wastes to energy plant provides; working with the CNYRPDB on the potential for microgrids and other resources for such a reliable source of power. 

  • Comprehensive solid wastes system is the county’s plan, administered by OCRRA
  • Conserves over 1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents each year from the recycling programs and wastes to energy facility; appreciate their support of OCRRA

Chairman Jordan adjourned at 1:04 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

11.13.19_EP_1

KATHERINE M. FRENCH, Deputy Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature


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PLANNING & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE MINUTES – NOVEMBER 14, 2019

JOHN D. McBRIDE, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Burtis, Mrs. Abbott-Kenan

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Holmquist, Mr. Buckel

ALSO ATTENDING:  See attached list

 

Chairman McBride called the meeting to order at 10:30 a.m.  Mr. McBride stated he would be taking agenda items 3 and 4 out of order.  A motion was made by Mr. Burtis, seconded by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan to waive the reading of the minutes of the previous committee meeting; MOTION CARRIED.  A motion was made by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, seconded by Mr. Burtis to approve the minutes of the previous committee meeting.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     VISIT SYRACUSE:  Danny Liedka, Director

        a.     Designating Visit Syracuse as the Agency Authorized to make Application to the New York State Department of Economic Development and to Receive Matching Funds Therefrom Under the New York State Tourist Promotion Act for 2020

  • Every year County designates Visit Syracuse as tourism agency, which qualifies Visit Syracuse for I Love NY funding ($67,000); they match the funding for the program and use it for marketing; cannot apply without designation

A motion was made by Mr. Burtis, seconded by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

2.     SYRACUSE ONONDAGA COUNTY PLANNING AGENCY:  Dan Kwasnowski, Director

        a.     Acceptance of Funds from the New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets for the Preparation of an Update of the Onondaga County Agricultural & Farmland Protection Plan, and Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into Contracts to Implement this Resolution ($50,000)

  • Updating Farmland Protection Plan; focusing on economic development, ag tourism and town planning
  • Resolution accepts $50,000 from state; additional $30,000 from Ag Council; $50,000 match from SOCPA, CCE and Soil and Water Conservation; Ag and Farm Board recommended themselves to be the Steering Committee for the plan
  • $30,000 in kind services is the match
  • Coming up is the Ag Dist 2 update; with recent funding will get $10,000 increase

A motion was made by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, seconded by Mr. Burtis, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

4.     ONONDAGA COUNTY ACCOUNTABILITY & REINVESTING CORPORATION:  Bob Petrovich, Director of Economic Development

        a.     Authorizing the Transfer of Tax Delinquent Properties to the Onondaga County Accountability & Reinvestment Corporation

  • Transfer tax delinquent properties in rears to County, then figure out strategy to get properties cleaned up, redeveloped and back on tax rolls; County Executive put initiative forward; this is to advance conversation with Legislature

Chairman McBride asked if there is a pending deal on the property, and Mr. Petrovich responded that he does not know the answer to that.  He believes the Legislature has been made aware of an agreement they have in regards to limitations of liability.  The agreement is a multifaceted approach that involves the DEC, County, City of Syracuse, IDA, Lank Bank and NYS Office of the Comptroller.  It affords an opportunity to provide some shielding of liability when the County takes the properties prior to knowing the environmental conditions. 

 

Chairman McBride asked if there are any updates on 56 Industrial, and Mr. Petrovich responded no.  He believes there is an agreement that has been reached with the owner; some payments are intended to be made or are going to be made.  When they have a better handle on it, they can come back to present it more fully. 

 

A motion was made by Mr. Burtis, seconded by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY:  Kevin Sexton, Chief Information Officer; Mark Mills, Senior Latent Print Examiner; Rick Trunfio, Deputy District Attorney

        a.     INFORMATIONAL -  BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Evidence Management System Upgrades in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $630,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $630,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($630,000)

 

Mr. Sexton:

  • Current evidence management system is Barcoded Evidence Analysis Statics Tracking System (BEASTS)
  • Submitting on behalf of Forensic Center, Sheriff, and District Attorney’s Office; as well as 20+ agencies using Beasts
  • BEASTS was implemented in 2009; grant funded; true shared service model and compliment to law enforcement RMS
  • Current version of BEASTS is aged and in need of upgrade – current is client server platform that hit dozens of PCs
  • Update is web based - upgrade once on a server, then available to all
  • Remote agencies currently using old version of Citrix for BEASTS, which is not supported; have to use Citrix because BEASTS uses palm pilots for barcode scanning and inventory management
  • System supports more evidence in timely fashion – important because of the new law, which has timing requirements involving getting evidence prepared
  • Improved user interface allows for using new lab equipment; does not interface with current version
  • $630,000 is max needed; most includes professional services for upgrades; can probably reduce spending to under $500,000 based on conversations - IT team can account for some work

Mr. Burtis asked if there is enough time to get this rolled out at the start of 2020.  Mr. Sexton responded that it will not be in time for January 1st.  They have had meetings discussing what they can do for a short term solution.  Mr. Burtis asked what the timeline is, and Mr. Sexton said he does not have the base project plan, but his guess is that it will be a six month project.

 

Mr. McBride asked Mr. Trunfio how important this is for him.  Mr. Trunfio answered:

  • Important now, while under current procedure law; reformat dismantled procedural law as they’ve known it
  • Expedited timeframes for evidence will be impossible for anyone to follow; anticipate workload for drugs will quadruple; most labs test about 20% - 30% of drugs that come in, and the new law requires testing 100%
  • First compliance for forensic evidence will be 15 days after the person is arrested, and currently it is 6 months

 

Mr. Mills apologized for Dr. Corrado not attending as she is in Albany at a Lab Directors Meeting.  He continued:

  • Consolidation that happened 10 years ago was a game changer; every agency in County able to see evidence
  • New web based version allows (i.e.) DA’s to access discovery package on the fly, which cannot be done currently
  • Report writing options will be available that will streamline information and get it out quicker
  • (i.e.) Investigators in the field can use tablets for notes versus hand writing and retyping later at the office
  • Trying to move to paperless systems, and any new equipment purchased will interface with this updated version

 

A motion was made by Mr. Burtis, seconded by Mrs. Abbott-Kenan, to adjourn the meeting.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 a.m.                                                     

 

Respectfully submitted,                                                                        

  11.14.19_Planning_1                                         

JAMIE McNAMARA, Assistant Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

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PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE MINUTESNOVEMBER 18, 2019

CHRISTOPHER J. RYAN, CHAIRMAN

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Bush, Mr. McBride, 1Mr. Rowley

MEMBERS ABSENT:  Mr. Bottrill

ALSO ATTENDING: see attached list

 

Chairman Ryan called the meeting to order at 12:00 p.m.  A motion was made by Mr. Bush, seconded by Mr. Rowley, to waive the reading of the proceedings from the previous committee.  MOTION CARRIED.  A motion was made by Mr. McBride, seconded by Mr. Bush, to approve the minutes of the previous committee.  MOTION CARRIED. 

 

Chairman Ryan stated that the agenda will be taken out of order.

 

3.     EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT:  Daniel Wears, Commissioner

        a.     Transfer from County Legislature, Account 666500 Contingent Account, to Emergency Management, Account 695700 Contractual Expense, $15,000

 

Mr. Wears:

  • Funds put into contingency annually, transfer requested for a contract with the Volunteer Fireman’s Association; reimbursable grant, saving funds to build a fire prevention trailer used around the county
  • Continuous – has been ongoing on for a number of years

Chairman Ryan said that this is for a good cause and it is something we do every year.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Bush, seconded by Mr. Rowley, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENTChief Ken Andrews, Civil Department; Captain Matt Kearney, Correction Department

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION: A Resolution Authorizing the Reconstruction/Construction of Improvements at the Corrections Facility in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $442,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $442,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($442,000)

 

Captain Kearney:

  • Two CIP projects:
  • 1) installing air conditioning in housing unit 3, currently none in the unit, high temperatures create all kinds of issues, had to provide additional relief for staff and inmates several times over the past summer, spiking temperatures cause people to be aggravated, not a good situation to have with the inmate population, also creates humidity that causes moisture and moisture damage
  • Passed around photos of the moisture damage in the unit; portable humidifiers aren’t able to handle the load, air conditioning will help control moisture - $260,000
  • 2) roadway repairs; passed around photos, very deteriorated around outbuildings, warehouse, and maintenance areas, have potholes, pieces of the road are missing, damages vehicles – especially snow removal equipment, cannot take forklift on certain areas because it is so unstable, consistently fill holes with runner crush, never lasts, intend to repave

In answer to Chairman Ryan, Captain Kearney confirmed the cost for the roadway repair was $182,000.  A secondary egress was completed off of the Taylor Road side of the facility last month.  Chairman Ryan said that it was part of the CIP from last year.  Captain Kearney confirmed this was correct.

 

Chairman Ryan asked if all appropriations from the last 2 years were now complete.  Captain Kearney answered that the air conditioning for unit 4 is in progress.

 

In answer to Chairman Ryan, Captain Kearney said that the housing units are very similar.  The air conditioning costs were based the bid for unit 4.  Chairman Ryan asked if it would be the same contractor.  Captain Kearney answered that it will have to go out for bid. 

 

In answer to Mr. Rowley, Captain Kearney confirmed that units 1 and 2 have to be done further down the line.  The units were built in 1983 and air conditioning was never installed.  Since that time air conditioning has been installed in anything newly built.  Air conditioning is not a requirement but it gets pretty tense and is causing a lot of damage. 

 

Mr. Bush asked how representative the photos were of the facilities in general.  Captain Kearney answered that the facility is 35+ years old and is showing some wear and tear.  The deterioration of the metal is from moisture in general; replaced doors and doorframes as they can, all are prefabricated and deteriorate.  Mr. Bush said that it is a poor representation of our county to have a facility look like this.  Captain Kearney responded that the photos zeroed in on the humidity and moisture problems.  Mr. Bush said it would lead one to question where the facilities upkeep was on a month to month basis.  Captain Kearney responded that overall the facility is pretty clean.  Through the years countless people have come in from outside agencies and made comments on how the facility looks overall.

 

Mr. McBride asked the lifespan of the air conditioning.  Chief Kearney responded that he did not know.  

 

Mr. Bush said that the driveway was an embarrassment as well as a safety issue.  Chief Kearney agreed.

 

        b.     Transfer from Sheriff’s Office, Account 641010 Regular Employee Salaries, to Sheriff’s Office, Account 641020 Overtime Wages, $1,640,296

 

Chief Andrews presented the following:

11.19.19_PS_1

 

11.19.19_PS_2

 

11.19.19_PS_3

11.19.19_PS_4

  • Transfer request, 101 line $1.9 million under budget per 11-7-19 projection, 102 line projected to be over budget $1.64 million
  • Staffing issue, full-time shortage caused overtime

In answer to Chairman Ryan, Chief Andrews confirmed that the amount is the total for the Sheriff’s department as a whole.  The break down by division is contained in the last 2 charts (see pages 3 & 4)

 

Chairman Ryan stated that it looks like everything else is under budget and asked if they anticipate staying that same course.  Chief Andrews responded that we have a monthly meeting on the projections and this has been holding true for the last several months; don’t expect any dramatic changes between now and the end of the year.  In answer to Chairman Ryan, Chief Andrews confirmed that they anticipate the 101 line to be under budget even with the transfer. 

 

Chairman Ryan asked about the staffing levels, if they were holding steady with attrition and near where they wanted to be or if there would be a call for another academy.  Chair Andrews responded that a police class is graduating on Friday which will help but those graduating will go into field training so they won’t be affecting the overtime right away.  On average they lose about 10 police deputies annually.  Another police academy may start at the end of next year.  There are 12 correction deputies currently attending the academy in Cayuga, which will bring the correction staging closer.  The Justice Center is the shortest in custody staffing right now.  After the first of the year, they will reevaluate how the new laws will affect staffing levels.  Right now they aren’t projecting much of an effect because the same deputies will be needed whether one deputy is watching 60 or 20 inmates. 

 

Chairman Ryan said that it is going to get complicated and will have to be watched.  Chief Andrews responded that the custody test given recently won’t be out for a couple of months.  Once we have the list we will probably hold another academy in the spring.  We will start evaluating needs and determine how big of an academy to have and whether it will be a custody or custody and corrections academy.

 

In answer to Chairman Ryan, Chief Andrews said that the attrition rate is more than 10 on the custody side but he does not know the average.   It has been twenty some odd years since the Justice Center was built and the influx of deputies hired during that phase are getting to the retirement stage; have been experiencing this for the last few years.  The attrition on the police side has been consistent at 9 to 10 per year for decades.  It takes a full year from hire to working on the road in order to fill some of the overtime needs.

 

Mr. Bush asked if it was a correct interpretation to say that all vacancies have been funded by this legislature and the staffing issue is a matter of recruiting and training.  Chief Andrews responded that it was definitely fair for custody and correction.  Sometimes positions are double filled when there is an academy and vacancies are projected.  Captain Pellizzari said that some supervisory positions are funded and with the 2020 budget they received 4 additional police positions.  Mr. Bush said that it was important to fill those positions. 

 

In answer to Mr. Rowley, Chief Andrews confirmed that custody and corrections take the same test.  Mr. Rowley asked how they determined who goes where since there are separate salary schedules and if there is a plan, hope, or wish to bring this to parity.  Chief Andrews responded that there is a wish but it will be handled on this side of the street.  Decades ago the legislature passed a resolution allowing custody deputies to live in adjoining counties, correction deputies must reside in Onondaga County.  Mr. Bush said that it should be consistent and Chief Andrews agreed.  Chief Andrews said that candidates can sign off from the list they do not want to participate in.  If candidates apply for both there is a discrepancy in pay but people do get hired.  Before it was one department under the Sheriff, some people were transferred from corrections to custody and that could be a remedy but he is not sure that it will be undertaken.  Parity would be a big step but that is a union issue. 

 

Chairman Ryan said that there will always be nuances between different bargaining units and asked the hourly disparity in pay.  Captain Pellizzari answered that the starting salary is the same.  After one-year custody has a significant increase over corrections. 

 

Chairman Ryan asked to be provided with both the DSBA and CSEA contracts, and the number of employees lost over the past 10 years for police, civil, corrections, and custody. 

 

A motion was made by Mr. Bush, seconded by Mr. McBride, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

2.     EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS:  Julie Corn, Commissioner

 

Chairman Ryan granted a request from Mr. Rowley to review item 2g first due to time constraints. 

 

        g.     Personnel Resolution: Advance Step L106549, Deputy Commissioner Emergency Communications (Operations), from Grade 35 Step G to Grade 35 Step M, December 3, 2019

 

Ms. Corn:

  • Advance step increase, from Grade 35g $77,000 to Grade 35m $85,000; previous deputy retired in September
  • Confident the selected replacement will do a great job, over 30 years’ experience between dispatching at the Onondaga County Sheriff’s office prior to what is now the 911 center and has been with the 911 center since its inception; came up through the ranks and most recently served as senior shift supervisor focused on administration training professional standards, number 3 in the leadership chain, has acted on behalf of both the commissioner and deputy commissioner on multiple occasions
  • Leadership style is exactly what is needed, well respected among peers and partners, brings necessary continuity as she is new to the center, a huge asset; acting in the deputy role since the deputy retired, without a doubt the best person for the job, will represent the county honorably
  • Step increase commensurate with his experience; no impact on their budget as $88,000 was budgeted for the former deputy
  • Made $100,000 last year with overtime; looking to close the pay cut gap and request support

Mr. Rowley asked his current step and grade as a shift supervisor.  Ms. Corn responded that he is making less than the starting salary but with overtime, he makes more.  Mr. Sparks said that he is a CSEA Grade 12 and the base is about *$67,000 (further detail pg. 6).  Mr. Rowley asked if it was normal to make about $40,000 in overtime.  Ms. Corn responded that it was a little on the high side but they have folks who make signification overtime money.  It is a no-fail mission and they cannot be understaffed.  Chairman Ryan said that not everyone would make that, some people choose to work a lot.  Ms. Corn agreed and said that he is at the highest CSEA contract level so his overtime costs more.  Mr. Bush said that this raises another whole set of questions. 

 

Mr. Rowley said that he is struggling with this and will be abstaining on the motion; may have more questions before the session. 

 

Chairman Ryan said that the increased step amount would be $3,000 less than the amount appropriated in the 2020 budget.  Mr. Bush said that someone will then have to fill his current position.  Ms. Corn said not necessarily.  Mr. Bush said that there will be another $100,000 dollar overtime person.  Ms. Corn responded that the legislature approved a second deputy but it was unfunded in the operating budget so they are trying to figure out how they can come up with those dollars; may shuffle some positions.  Mr. Bush said that it would be major in order to fill those hours.  Ms. Corn clarified that he was an administrative staff person who worked from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and could work the floor to fill in as needed.  The floor is not his full-time job.  Mr. Bush said that this clarifies things a little bit.  Ms. Corn said that their administrative staff has about 20 people.

 

*Mr. Sparks said that the Grade 12 a-scale salary starts at $61,045; his salary is $68,066 at the z-scale. 

 

For clarification, Mr. Bush said he has no problem with an administrator taking on another role so that they can run effectively.  Ms. Corn responded that the task will be backfilled.  They are trying to think of a smart way to do this; may not need to promote another person to that salary range or PSS level to cover everything.  Mr. Bush said that she mentioned another deputy position.  Ms. Corn responded that their operating budget requested bringing back a second deputy that had been on the books from years ago, which was approved but unfunded. 

 

In answer to Mr. Bush, Ms. Corn said that the second deputy would be technical administrations, focused on technology; this one is operations.  The two pillars that help the 911 center function are people and technology and this will allow those duties to be split between instead of one person having to do it all. 

 

Mr. Bush said that this is not currently in the organizational chart.  Ms. Corn responded that she is currently shaping a new one and plans on sharing it with the staff on the first of the year assuming they can find the funds to fill the second deputy.  Things will trickle down from there as they make sure all duties are covered but they may not add an additional shift supervisor to save money.

 

Mr. Rowley asked to be provided with the annual overtime amounts for the last couple of years.

 

Mr. Bush asked if Mr. Rowley wanted to share his concerns with the committee to assist in their decision making.  Mr. Rowley said that he is trying to reconcile why this person would want to take a pay cut if he is consistently making $100,000 with overtime and has at least 30 years of service; he wants to be careful that they are not moving him into a different role just because he may be getting close to retirement and the salary is being bumped as a favor.  Mr. Rowley is not saying that is happening and based on what has been told to us that is not the case; just wants to be careful and mull it over a little more. 

 

Ms. Corn said that she cannot say enough about the man.  Mr. Rowley said that it seems as if he is a valuable employee.  Ms. Corn said that being new to this position and seeing the difference in a couple of management confidential positions it is hard to incentivize folks who can make a lot of money with overtime, and this is somebody who is willing to do that.  Mr. Rowley said that the more they talk about it the more he is coming to realize that they are just trying to soften the blow for him which makes sense.  Ms. Corn said thank you.

 

Chairman Ryan said that getting to $100,000 with overtime is a lot of working hours and perhaps he sees this as a better opportunity to be management confidential, work in a different capacity with fewer hours and minimizing the pay cut might help make that decision.  Ms. Corn said that the chairman has nailed it.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Bush, seconded by Mr. McBride, to approve this item.  Ayes:  3; Nos:  0; Abstained:  1 (Rowley).  MOTION CARRIED

 

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION: A Resolution Authorizing Auxiliary Power Systems Replacement at E911 Main Center in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $688,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $688,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($688,000)

 

  • Total of 6 bond projects, 4 proposed last year, 2 are new, all projects are about systems or equipment that reached or have gone beyond the end of life or are obsolete due to new technology
  • No-fail mission-based, upgrades needed to do the job effectively and keep people safe
  • New backup generator, uninterruptable power supply (UPS) required to maintain power during a power failure or major storm, provides generator redundancy, won’t have to go to the backup center during a power failure or for routine maintenance
  • Redundancy is key, everything goes two by two to ensure they never go dark
  • Current generator over 25 years old, UPS was manufactured in 2003 and has a service life of 15-20 years; in need of a backup as the current system starts to fail, now working but at end of life
  • Proposed last year, was not funded; trying to fund through NYS grants, if successful won’t need bonding, doing both simultaneously

 

Mr. Bush said that this was discussed before.  Chairman Ryan said that we have discussed a lot of these at length.

 

        b.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION: A Resolution Authorizing Engineering and Bid Specification Work in Connection with the Next Generation 911 Telephone System Replacement/Refresh Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $212,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $212,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($212,000)

 

  • New proposal for Next Generation 911 telephone system replacement or refresh
  • Multi-year request, current request for consultant services to assist in the development of RFP for the necessary services and equipment to get next-gen ready; request funds for the system itself later
  • Not new, next-gen has been coming for years, don’t have full control over when it will happen, need to be prepared
  • Current call taking solution was installed in 2016, will reach the end of life in 2021; 27 work stations at the main center and 16 at the backup site

Chairman Ryan asked if next-gen was referring to cellular next-gen migration of 5g and everything else.  Ms. Corn answered yes, it is the ability to handle and transfer both analog and digital information.  Handling pictures and videos will come with another set of conversations as far as how the staff handles that but no matter what they need to be ready to handle that complex data information.  Currently, it is just calls and text. 

 

1Mr. Rowley apologized for having to leave the meeting at this time.

 

        c.     INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION: A Resolution Authorizing the Replacement of the Makyes Radio Tower in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $265,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $265,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($265,000)

  • Proposed last year, was not funded; replaced Rose Hill tower last year, was built in the 1960s
  • Makyes is the next oldest tower, hazard if it were to fall down, need to do something
  • Part of the interoperable communication system that powers the radio system for all first responders in Onondaga County and is connected to surrounding counties
  • Losing 1 tower weakens the entire system in the adjacent areas, critical; also trying to fund with NYS grants

In answer to Chairman Ryan, Ms. Corn said that they are confident that they will receive the grant.  In answer to Mr. McBride, Ms. Corn said that the grant would cover all of both projects.

 

        d.     INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION: Resolution Authorizing the Replacement of Mobile Data Communications Network Infrastructure in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $3,600,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $3,600,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($3,600,000)

  • The most complex project which may sound familiar but has possibly morphed; system passed its end of life in 2017, had the service for 10 years, looking to replace with something good for the next 10 years
  • Proposed last year, was not funded; the most expensive and highest priority because it touches so many agencies, critical, it is the communication network between 911 and first responder vehicles; CAD system is the channel used to communicate between the 911 center and vehicles
  • Handles the maps used for automatic vehicle location, allows dispatchers to know where the closest vehicles are to get the first responder on scene and find the next closest to support, covers CAD notational data systems; would have to rely on radio systems without this, which is not fathomable with wireless broadband technology and the way they need to communicate
  • The CIP would supply the modems, hardware and software pieces that would upgrade the network in the vehicle and the 911 center but it would stop short of the subscriptions
  • A complex project to discuss, subscriptions fall outside the scope of the CIP and would be discussed during operating budget time; asking for $3.6 million in the CIP, cannot have second conversation without starting with the modems 
  • Are leaders in communication and have previously provided radios, laptops, and modems to first responders, haven’t provided everything but when something new comes out is has been a precedent to get the right equipment in the hands of first responders so that all are on the same page; may figure out how first responders can fund it in their own way
  • This gets us started on the right foot; the current system is at dialup speed, have to send tech team out to fix vehicles, first responders are forced to buy devices to get by as they wait for us to come up with an answer, constantly questioned at police and fire chief meetings, people are looking for an answer - will the county help support this, now is the time to provide that answer

Chairman Ryan said that $3.6 million is all-inclusive and is what is needed to change this antiquated, failing, and old method of communication system.  Ms. Corn responded that there is a buffer.  They would pole every first responder agency to ask if anyone has bought a modem to see if there is anywhere they can save and do this in the smartest way possible.  The goal is to try to get everyone with the same equipment because it will ease the way they service those vehicles.  There are risks involved with having different equipment in the system and the ability to work effectively.  Mr. Spraker said that Winbourne Consulting was hired to do an overall review of the county network and came up with this proposal.  They will work with them to prepare an RFP.  This would uninstall the current system and reinstall new modems in all the first responder vehicles.  As the commissioner stated, this would be all-inclusive except for the subscriptions.  In answer to Mr. McBride, Mr. Spraker confirmed that this is a consultant recommendation.

 

In answer to Mr. Bush, Ms. Corn said she did not know why it wasn’t funded last year.  Mr. Bush asked if they were looking for grants to help with the costs as this will be funded by local tax dollars.  Ms. Corn answered that she realizes this but grants do not fund wireless broadband.  Mr. Spraker said that in 2007 it was a $6.8 million dollar project for the current decade. 

 

Mr. Bush asked if this would be compatible with counties in the surrounding region.  Mr. Spraker said yes, it is a commercial broadband modem with a Sera cradlepoint device.  It is a VPN device so Ethernet traffic from the cars to the 911 center can be used to communicate with them through our CAD software and information from other counties could be pushed out to them through our network.  Mr. Bush said that there seems to be more integration with neighboring counties.  Ms. Corn said that Onondaga County is usually at the forefront.

 

Mr. Bush said that sometimes there is kickback with regard to the equipment selection; it may not match up with what they have in their vehicles and frustration develops.  Mr. Spraker responded that some money will be reduced from this as they helped SPD get a grant to purchase the same software for their fleet, and they talked to the Sheriff’s department, SPD, and other agencies to discuss what they are looking to buy for their first response vehicles.  Mr. Bush asked about fire departments and ambulance organizations.  Mr. Spraker answered that those buying new vehicles are buying ones and two’s because they are not putting in old technology, they are waiting for us.

 

Mr. Bush asked if there would be financial support from the county to encourage them to buy equipment that would be compatible with this.  Many volunteer fire departments are on limited budgets; how much of an impact will this have.  Ms. Corn answered that they will be overjoyed if the county covers this portion.  The subscription is phase two and we have received feedback that they are concerned that they will not be able to handle the costs.  The dilemma is trying to figure out who is going to pay for it.  It is beyond the scope of the CIP but we have to think about both to have this conversation.

 

Chairman Ryan said that municipalities purchasing new equipment have something installed for communication and asked if it would cost them money to cutover to this.  Ms. Corn said that they are getting by with band-aide devices; very few have bought actual modems.  The ones who have, have been police and EMS agencies.  Fire agencies are the ones they worry about most.  They are the most vocal and financially strapped.  Mr. Spraker said that broadband modem is the way to go for next generation.  The newer technology would give us the ability to send more data and information to respond on the scene.

Ms. Corn said that the biggest concern is that if people have different systems the system will start to diminish its effectiveness as there will be those that we can communicate everything to and everyone should be able to use the 911 system effectively.  We are moving to next-gen and everyone needs to be on board.  Mr. Bush said that we have to look beyond departments; need to look at people and no matter where they are in this county they should all have access to the same safety and services.  Ms. Corn agreed and added that it is a big price tag.  Mr. Bush said that he hopes she will get prepared.

 

        e.     INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION: A Resolution Authorizing the Oblique Aerial Digital Imagery Refresh Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $300,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $300,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($300,000)

  • Not Google maps, company is called Pictomerty; share need and benefits with SOCPA
  • An airplane would fly over the county and collect high-resolution oblique aerial imagery; oblique means the image is shot at an angle which is much more effective for the 911 center as imagery is used for every call that comes in
  • Call-takers have 4 to 5 screens up at any given time, 1 screen is devoted to imagery, able to give detailed information
  • Imagery can do lots of things but needs updating at least every 4 years to be effective; currently at the 5-year mark
  • City of Syracuse, SOCPA, all county departments, towns, and villages, and the public benefit; worth the investment

Mr. Don Jordan said that in addition to being a fundamental component of the CAD system it is used extensively throughout the county and municipal government.  Through the county’s contract with Pictomerty the city, towns, and villages are all local users of this web-based application.  Onondaga County has more than 300 users accessing this imagery from more than 40 organizations.  It is used extensively and they have access to the imagery and a whole host of other information, which is used on a daily basis throughout the county.  It is available to the public as well as imagery is integrated into SOCPA’s GIS website and Real Property’s online application.  It is an essential tool for county departments and municipalities.

 

In answer to Chairman Ryan, Ms. Corn confirmed that this was a holdover from last year.

 

        f.      INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION: A Resolution Authorizing the Repaving of the E911 Center Parking Lot in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $344,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $344,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($344,000)

  • New project; parking lot is over 30 years old, potholes are everywhere and constantly need to be filled, strips are less defined, the gap is increasing from the pavement to the sidewalk
  • Ground sensors are used to enter and exit the gate; keep having to fix around this area, has become less reliable
  • Conduits run through the parking lot with the mainlines for telephone, internet, and power, risk of exposure has increased, also a safety issue
  • Invite all to tour the facility; care about the safety of personnel, visitors, and partners coming to the center, needs repaving at some point 

Chairman Ryan stated that the committee toured the facility years ago and could possibly have a meeting there. 

 

Mr. Bush asked if the SPCA could provide an update to the committee.  Chairman Ryan responded that he wasn’t sure they were under the purview of the Public Safety Committee but he would check into it.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Bush, seconded by Mr. McBride, to adjourn the meeting at 1:12 p.m.  MOTION CARRIED.

 

Respectfully submitted,

11.19.19_PS_5

KATHERINE M. FRENCH, Deputy Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

 

11.19.19_PS_6

 

 

 

 

 

* * *

 

 

WAYS & MEANS COMMITTEE MINUTES

November 19, 2019

DEB CODY, CHAIR

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:  Mr. Jordan, **Mr. Ryan, Mrs. Ervin, Mr. Rowley, Mr. May, *Ms. Williams

ALSO PRESENT:  Chairman Knapp, Dr. Chase, see also attached list

 

Chair Cody called the meeting to order at 9:07 a.m.  A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to waive the reading and approve the minutes of the proceedings of the previous committee.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

Chair Cody took the agenda out of order.

 

6.     TRANSPORTATION:  Marty Voss, Commissioner

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing DOT Facilities Improvements in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $1,000,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $1,000,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($1,000,000)

  • Part of CIP process during the budget review
  • For ongoing facility repairs for Jamesville and Marcellus shops
  • Allow maintaining facilities at appropriate level of condition – replace gutters, install heat trays, siding, roofs, fuel pumps, etc.

Chair Cody said that these are needed repairs - nothing fancy.  Mr. Voss said they just want to keep the buildings dry and warm, reduce energy consumption, maintain operation, to plow snow, and service roads out of these facilities.

 

In answer to Mr. May, Mr. Voss said that these two facilities haven’t been brought to the legislature before.  Camillus was finished in 2017; in the process of evaluating in the north area facility, which the legislature has already approved – there have been set backs along the way.  These facilities, are functioning now; Jamesville is a little newer, but these are things that they are starting to spend a little money on – should really do them as a CIP project and avoid the need for big bond ask later.

 

Mr. May said that there is a huge list of capital projects today, and there are a couple items on the list that didn’t need to be information and could get a vote today.  This is routine work – and is one of the things he is comfortable voting on today, despite the two-bite rule.

 

Mr. Jordan referred to $20,000 to replace entrance doors and frames as well as $380,000 to replace overhead doors, and asked how many doors are included.  Mr. Voss said that at Jamesville there are16 doors.  The doors on either side of the building are not average doors – they are big, industrial size doors that can accommodate a snowplow in and out.  They are big, expensive, and the installation is not cheap.  They take a beating in the winter with mud and salt and haven’t been replaced in 25 -30 years or longer.  They have to be replaced for security and integrity of the HVAC system.  Mr. Jordan referred to the entrance doors and asked if they are a similar to an Anderson steel door on a house.  Mr. Dyer said that they are hollow metal framed doors, a similar sizing to what is on a house.  To change it up you have to take the wall out; essentially pull out the frame and put in a new door.  They have been maintained over the years, but as it goes along, we can’t keep up with the doors and are trying to replace them.  There around 15 doors in Marcellus; replacing doors outside and inside that separate garage from cold storage, etc.

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Ervin, seconded by Mr. May, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

1.     SYRACUSE ONONDAGA COUNTY PLANNING AGENCY:  Dan Kwasnowski, Director

a.     Acceptance of Funds from the New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets for the Preparation of an Update of the Onondaga County Agricultural & Farmland Protection Plan, and Authorizing the County Executive to Enter into Contracts to Implement this Resolution ($50,000)

  • First adopted plan in 1987
  • Has been successful – if everything goes will there will be 10,000 acres of protected farm land
  • New areas in the plan are agri-tourism and economic development – growing sector with LaFayette Apple Festival, Beak and Skiff, etc.
  • Local communities are looking for ways to farm land from a land use perspective
  • 2 yr. process $50,000 from state, $30,000 from Ag. Council; $20,000 in kind from Cooperative Extension 

Mr. May asked to be listed as a co-sponsor to the resolution.  He said that the Ag and Farmland Protection Bd. Stepped up to marshal this project through.  It’s a great group – Planning, CCE, nice cross section of county farmers – it is really a perfect group to bring this forward.  They more less volunteered themselves to undertake this task.  Bringing ag tourism and some of the other things into this mix is the right thing to do and very timely.

 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mr. Ryan, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

2.     EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT:  Dan Wears, Commissioner

a.     Transfer from County Legislature, Account 666500 Contingent Account, to Emergency Management, Account 695700 Contractual Expense, $15,000

  • For the grant that the County Legislature gives the Onondaga County Volunteer Firemen’s Association each year
  • Used for firefighter training and training for the general public  

Mr. May asked to be listed as a co-sponsor to the resolution.

 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve this item.  Pass unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

3.     FINANCE – REAL PROPERTY TAX SERVICES:  Don Weber, Director

  • Annual resolutions for tax rates 

        a.     Call for a Public Hearing on the Assessment Roll for Southwood-Jamesville Water District

  • Small water district with a handful of parcels 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        b.     Call for a Public Hearing on the Assessment Roll for Warners Water District

  • Small water district with a handful of parcels, Town of Camillus 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        c.     Onondaga County Sanitary District General Apportionment

  • County sewer charge amongst towns in the district 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        d.     Onondaga County Sanitary District, 2020 City Abstract

  • City’s portion of the share of the sewer unit charge 

A motion was made by Mrs. Ervin, seconded by Mr. May, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        e.     2020 City Drainage District Abstract

  • City’s share of county’s drainage districts  

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

*Ms. Williams arrived at the meeting.

 

        f.      Bear Trap – Ley Creek Drainage District Tax – General Apportionment

        g.     Bear Trap – Ley Creek Drainage District Tax Town of Clay Apportionment

        h.     Bear Trap – Ley Creek Drainage District Tax Town of Dewitt Apportionment

        i.      Bear Trap – Ley Creek Drainage District Tax Town of Salina Apportionment

 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve items 3f, 3g, 3h, and 3i.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        j.      Bloody Brook Drainage District Tax – General Apportionment

        k.     Bloody Brook Drainage District Tax Town of Clay Apportionment

        l.      Bloody Brook Drainage District Tax Town of Salina Apportionment

 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mr. Ryan, to approve items 3j, 3k, and 3l.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        m.    Authorizing General Apportionment of Harbor Brook Drainage District Tax

 

        n.     Harbor Brook Drainage District Tax Town of Geddes Apportionment

 

A motion was made by Mr. Ryan, seconded by Mr. Rowley, to approve items 3m and 3n.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        o.     Meadowbrook Drainage District Tax General Apportionment

        p.     Meadowbrook Drainage District Tax Town of Dewitt Apportionment

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Ervin, seconded by Mr. May, to approve items 3o and 3p.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        q.     Onondaga County Water District, 2020 City Abstract

  • City’s portion to the county’s water district 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve item 3q.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        r.      Allocation of 2020 Onondaga County Water District Special Assessment Among Zones of Assessment and Fixing the Composite Rates for the Several Towns and the City of Syracuse within said District

  • Setting water rates for all towns in the district  

A motion was made by Mr. Rowley, seconded by Mr. Jordan, to approve item 3r.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

4.     LIBRARY:  Dawn Marmor, Director

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Purchase of a Bookmobile in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $260,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $260,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($260,000)

  • Add bookmobile to outreach service
  • Worked with libraries across the state; a library in Buffalo has had great success with it – modeled a lot of our plan off of their success
  • 22’ unit – traditional and high-tech equipped bookmobile
  • Will make regular stops in areas that don’t have library buildings; represent OCPL at festivals, fairs, parades, cultural events – help to promote library services including life-long learning 

Mr. May asked what the annual operating costs will be – staffing, etc.  Ms. Marmor said the unit will be staffed with a librarian 1 – an additional position that they will be asking for funding from the city abstract.  Will also have a full time librarian assistant, a position vacant at a branch currently – plan to reassign that position to the bookmobile.  Additionally, there will be two part-time library clerks—there are 2 vacant positions which will be reassigned.  The annual cost for fuel is estimated to be $3,500; maintenance estimated to be $5,000, but difficult to pin that down – there is vehicle and generator servicing involved.  There are also expenses for insurance and Wi-Fi capability.  Ms. Marmor said that $10,000 is planned for the initial materials on the bookmobile, but will not be a yearly expense.  She estimated that three quarters to half of that would be spent on an annual basis.

 

Mrs. Ervin asked what the cost would be yearly; Ms. Marmor said it is estimated to be $197,000.

 

Mr. Rowley asked if it is built, or if it can be bought off the shelf.  Ms. Marmor said that companies put them together and there is a fair amount of customization that can be done.  Today they have Wi-Fi and are able to engage in computer training.  The expense for the unit is fully equipped with all of the shelving, and everything that is needed.

 

Mr. Rowley asked if this will impact circulation statistics; is there history on that.  Mr. Marmor said that circulation statistics at other libraries where they have instituted a more modern bookmobile is up between 20% - 40% overall.  She said it allows providing service to areas that are underserved.

 

Chair Cody asked how the underserved areas are determined; would there be a monthly schedule.  Ms. Marmor said it would be where people have a hard time getting out to a library, i.e. nursing homes, will have an early literacy component - nursery schools, local schools.  A regular schedule will be set up and will also be available for people that contact the library and want a visit.  It will change every two weeks, and then rotate back.

 

Mr. Jordan said that at the County Facilities Committee, it was indicated that the annual estimated cost would be over $200,000.  Ms. Marmor said that was based on looking at the cost of the bookmobile in Buffalo, but when a closer look was taken, she said that she is confident that this is not an overly conservative estimate.

 

Mr. Rowley asked if grant funds were looked at for this.  Ms. Marmor said that they were and expects to receive some support from the Friends group and from NYS.

 

Mr. May asked if a CDL driver is required.  Ms. Marmor said that it is not – the librarians will be driving the vehicle.

 

Mr. Jordan asked if the grants referenced will be used to defray the cost of the purchase and/or the annual operating costs.  Ms. Marmor said that she can’t answer that--public libraries receive money from NYS, also outreach money and LSTA money can be used, but it varies from year to year and can’t give an exact figure right now.  Mr. Jordan asked for a ballpark figure; Ms. Marmor said that she can’t provide that now, but can report back to Mr. Jordan with that information.

 

Mr. Ryan asked for further detail regarding providing services to the underserved.  Ms. Marmor said that underserved areas are where people would have a difficult time getting to a brick and mortar building become of transportation, finances, etc.  Also, the vehicle will be totally accessible for anyone with a disability.  In some parts of the country, where there are accessibility issues in libraries, the bookmobile functions as a branch on wheels.

 

5.     WATER ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION:  Frank Mento, Commissioner, Mike Lannon, Deputy Commissioner

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - A Resolution Approving the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Baldwinsville Treatment Plant within the Onondaga County Sanitary District

        b.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of an Additional $31,280,200 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay the Increased Cost of Certain Improvements for the Baldwinsville Treatment Plant in and for the Onondaga County Sanitary District ($31,280,200)

  • 2 projects (items 5a – 5d) that are part of CIP plan 

Mr. Rowley asked what the actual increase is to the project.  Mr. Lannon said it is $31,280,200.  Mr. Rowley said that in the past CIP’s it was $30 million – and asked if it is being doubling.  Mr. Mento clarified that it is not being doubled.  The increase is about $1.2 million.  Mr. Lannon said for the latest estimate for this particular asset renewal is a combination of various asset renewal measures for equipment, etc. and an allocation for $1 million for the next phase--replacing some of the clarifier systems, mechanicals, etc.  Combined it sums up to the $31,289,200. 

 

Mr. Rowley asked why the entire amount was being asked for in one resolution – it usually is laid out over a number of years and then bonded accordingly.  Mr. Lannon said an asset management evaluation was done by a consultant, and then the asset manage program was used to rate those assets in terms of likelihood of failure, consequence of failure.  A direct multiplication of those two identified the business risks of the different assets.  Through a very similar process that was done with the Brewerton facility, as part of the standard approach, the assets that need to be replaced in the near future were identified.  This is the appropriate capital improvement bucket to go ahead and replace those assets.  Also, to do the design - procure those monies – complete the design and come back to the legislature for construction monies a couple of years down the road.  At that point those systems will be over 40 years old.  The plant was built in 1942 – much of the equipment is still original to the plant.  Mr. Rowley said that he understands all of that and doesn’t doubt that it needs to be upgraded, but his question is a financing question.  He said that the looks that at the CIP and it seems that the bonding was spread out over a number of years, and now all of the bonding is being asked for all up front.  Mr. Morgan said that they ask for authorization but only borrow what they need to – will not go out and borrow $30 million right off the bat.  Mr. Rowley asked if bond approvals have been done for this project in the past because it has been on the books.  Mr. Lannon said that $6.3 million was bonded for the engineering.  Mr. Morgan said that typically they come and ask for authorization to do design work and engineering to get a better idea of what the structure cost is going to be and then come back and ask for the authorization of the funds to actually do the work.  Mr. Lannon said that the earlier bonds, $6.3 million, were for procuring engineering for a disinfection project that had to be done in accordance the DEC SPDES permit and construction of that improvement of disinfection and de-chlorination.  The last component that concluded the bonding was for the engineering for this particular project.  Mr. Mento said that this $31.2 million in is the construction value going forward – it won’t be borrowed all up front.  It gives authorization for the total amount of construction and it will move through the process as needed.

 

Mr. Rowley said that he is trying to equate what is being asked for with the budget and the CIP presented.  He said we are going to authorize the $31 million, but are going to borrow more along the lines of what is in the CIP.  Mr. Morgan said that is correct; right now there are no funds in the 2020 budget related to debt service for this.  If this is approved, depending on how the project proceeds, if borrowed for next year, interest would hit in 2021.

 

Mr. May said that unfortunately this plant is surrounded by 3 subdivisions, right next door.  These failures are starting to affect the way of life out there, and thinks there needs to be a little bit of flexibility with the bonding authority to address some of the more pressing issues as they come up.  Mr.  Mento said that a portion of this project that deals with odor control is being accelerated – to take care of the situation Mr. May described.  Chair Cody said it also avoids a potential DEC fine.  Mr. Mento agreed, noting that they have already been there once to inspect the plant.

 

        c.     INFORMATIONAL - A Resolution Approving Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District Consisting of the CSO 029 Walton Street Abatement Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York

        d.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of $2,020,000 Bonds of the County of Onondaga, New York, to Pay Costs of Certain Improvements for the Onondaga County Sanitary District in and for said County ($2,020,000)

  • Connects to CSO that discharges to Onondaga Creek
  • Putting in a regulator connection to divert flow to a different trunk and cut down on CSO discharge
  • Coordinating with City  

Chair Cody said that this is near the MOST.  Mr. Ryan asked about the coordination with the City.  Mr. Mento said City engineering, Green Committee, anybody that wants to get involved and needs to know what is happening there.  Construction will be a bit difficult in this area.  In answer to Mr. Jordan, Mr. Lannon said that construction will start mid-year 2020.

 

7.     FACILITIES MANAGEMENT:  Archie Wixson, Commissioner

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Capital Improvements at Various Facilities in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $1,500,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $1,500,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($1,500,000)

  • Various facilities/various capital improvements – used to have several different various accounts – have eliminated that and all grouped into this
  • $1.5 million/year does a pretty good job of maintaining assets -11 properties – for security, ADA improvements, roof and flooring replacements – etc.  

Mr. May asked if the $1.5 million is being spent every year.  Mr. Wixson said that they are on track to spend it every year; it will carry over if not spent.  There will be years where something unforeseen comes up, i.e. major roofs – will have to sacrifice possibly investing one building in a certain year and carry over to the next year.  Mr. Ryan questioned if that then wouldn’t be bonded for – it would be taken out of the $1.5 million.  Mr. Wixson agreed.  He noted that they do a good job of paying attention and avoiding a catastrophe – can project the useful life.  If it is known that they need to do a major roof repair, he will pull back on some of the investment in some other buildings.  Mr. Ryan said that you could use this to do preventive maintenance to maybe get 10 more years out a roof before we have to go out and bond.  Mr. Wixson agreed and explained that they try to use capital funds for asset replacement; more of the preventative maintenance is done through the operating budget. 

 

Mr. Jordan asked if when we bond for this, a project account is set up.  Mr. Morgan agreed.  Mr. Jordan asked if the project account is delineated to, i.e. $150,000 for public access systems, or is $1.5 million for this whole list of projects.  Mr. Morgan that there are times when phases of a project are used to segregate some funds out so that it can be tracked separately, but typically it is all in one project.  Mr. Jordan asked if, for example, floors are estimated at $60,000 and it actually gets done for $45,000, what happens to the extra $15,000 that wasn’t spent on that particular project.  Mr. Wixson said that it stays in that account and can be used for something else.  

 

A motion was made by Mrs. Ervin, seconded by Mr. May, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

**Mr. Ryan left the meeting.

 

        b.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Rehabilitation of the Carnegie Library in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $2,365,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $2,015,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($2,015,000)

  • Have been to the legislature several times in the past; have pushed this down the road each year for 5 -6 years
  • Each year that we don’t capture rehab to Carnegie Library, there is an acceleration of cost due to consumer cost index
  • Transition the asset into an opportunity for some departments and shared services 

Mr. Jordan said that an analysis was done of all county space within all county facilities.  He recollects that it said there was unused space.  The conclusion was that there was sufficient space already and maybe excess space to house all of our county offices.  At the time the intent was to take some of the Social Services programs where spaced was being rented, which was not owned by the county, and move them into that county owned space.  The conclusion was that it would most likely not happen because the actual cost per square foot in the county space would be higher than what we are paying now, as well as there being parking issues.  The conclusion was that the federal and state governments wouldn’t approve the switch because it would actually be an increase in the cost and not a decrease in cost.  He asked what the business model is to spend $4 million to now rehab the Carnegie building, if we already have space that is either sufficient sufficient as it is or have excess capacity.

 

Mrs. Ervin said that we own that too; it’s an asset.  Mr. Jordan said that he has been advocating that we sell it for years.

 

Mr. Wixson is happy that he has been supported in bringing back in the social services and health departments into the county buildings.  It was done with Jobs Plus and Healthy Families – have completely filled the County Office Building and have just short of filled the Civic Center.  There is some small space on the 8th floor.  As some of the social services are growing that space may be used for them.  The main rented lease space that the county pays for is for WIC.  It was determined that the best location for WIC was not in the building because of the access, proximity to locations for the public.  What is being considered, with the County Executive working with the City of Syracuse, are for some of the combined departments that will better serve our community – Community Development, Economic Department, and SOCPA.  It can be a one-stop shop for those services and they can share their resources.

 

Mr. Wixson said that he hates to see that building deteriorate like other vacant buildings, where the cost is in demolition instead of use.  Right now it’s in pretty good condition, but it is going to need some investment. 

 

Mr. Jordan said that if we are putting in shared services with the city, will they be kicking in towards the cost of remodeling.  Mr. Wixson said it is all being worked out now – have done several studies which were shared with the legislature, over the last few years and shown that business case.  He said “we have shown that shared investment and shared operating cost – it ends up being a positive investment for the county.”  Mr. Jordan said that he would like to see what the agreement is with the city before we go ahead and approve a venture like this. 

 

Mr. Jordan said that he saw the RFP when this supposedly went out and was offered for sale, and it was draconian at the least and can see why we didn’t get much interest from outside individuals.  He said that it is a beautiful building, and thinks that there are developers out there that would be very interested in developing it, but not under the conditions placed on it before when it was listed for sale.  He said “it will take a lot more, in terms of a business case, for me to support this.”  Mr. Wixson said that the market study was done in 2013 and indicated a much lower value than everyone had in their mind.  If you look at what the real estate market had done locally, with buildings that have the same build out opportunities for an investor, it doesn’t meet that market goal.  Although it is a 52,000 sq. ft. building, there is 29,500 sq. feet of usable, separatable space.  There is quite a bit of communal space – grand entrances, lobbies – can’t put a tenant in there that would be separate than the other tenants.  That is why the shared organizations were looked it.  For an investor to break up that space, would limit it to probably one company to occupy the entire building. 

 

Mr. Jordan said that he had pushed before that this property be listed for sale.  When it was listed, it had so many conditions and restrictions that were inherent in the solicitation for bids, that he was not surprised at all that no one bid on it.  He noted that he invests in real estate and looked at it and said “I wouldn’t by this in a million years; I’d be so handcuffed by the conditions placed upon this that it would be completely unattractive for a developer to develop it.”  He said that was not his intent; his intent was to list it with a commercial real estate agent and have an offer made to purchase it.  Mr. Wixson said that the listing on the historical preservation roster has limits.

 

Chair Cody asked when we would know more specifically about the agreement with the city and who exactly would be going in there.  Mr. Wixson said some information can come back to the committee fairly shortly.  Ms. Primo said that they are in conversation now with the city; they have to get some things straightened out on their end.  The departments that work together a little bit – SOCPA, Economic Development, and Community Development – would be housed there.  She said that she thinks also City Codes would go there.  It really would be a one stop shop for anyone who does any kind of development.  There is a little bit of urgency in that the city has to get moving on some to the things they want to do.  Economic Development has a lease that will expire next summer.  The thought is to get things going so that we can get some people moved in next summer.

 

Ms. Primo said that she disagrees with the draconian label, but regarding the RFP that went out, it is recognized that this is not a cookie cutter building.  It is an historical building, a gem, and wanted to make sure that it would be cared for and preserved in a way that makes sense.  It is a building that we will not garner a lot of money for if sold on the market because it is a difficult building to develop to create the kind of space that would be wanted to recoup your money.  She said that maybe a company that would use it for corporate headquarters may want it, but either way a lot of money would have to be put into it to make it a space that they want it to reflect.  She said the administration is looking at it as more of a functional space, want to preserve its beauty – not looking to make it a Taj Mahal.   It seems like it is more economical and a great asset for the county to own, bring together the city and county, a reflection of our great history, and allows providing better services. 

 

Mr. May said that he is open to the idea, but the ask is most definitely incomplete.  He said that to fully have his support he wants to see what kind of revenue is coming from the city, what kind of rent savings will there be from Economic Development, etc.  Even if it is a net cost to the county for the benefits described, then the legislature is entitled to understand what that is, and really needs to have that before it can be moved forward.

 

Mr. Rowley said that he is all in favor of spending the money to preserve the building, but thinks that we are missing an opportunity.  It is a grand building, and to use it for county business is difficult to envision.  He feels that an opportunity would be missed if “we don’t go out and kick the tires one more time” and see if there something else it can be used for.   

 

        c.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing HVAC Renovations at the Courthouse in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $1,000,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $1,000,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($1,000,000)

  • Rehab HVAC system in court house
  • Comprehensive study done several years ago; close to having some feedback from studies going on now – will determine sequence of events to rehab
  • Falling short in controls – it is pretty much obsolete on the market and are band-aiding it
  • Regarding energy efficiency, it’s one of the more efficient county owed buildings because it is a solid masonry building – once cool, in the summer it maintains cool; once warmed in the winter, it maintain the warmth
  • Manual controls and infrastructure are corroding, deteriorating – valves, steam traps, fin tube, induction heaters – very difficult to repair/replace – have to shut down large areas to do that
  • Last upgrade done 50-55 years ago – hard to get pipes apart; they solidify
  • Incremental investment - $1 million for initial steps; over next 5 years there will be incremental asks 

Mr. Jordan asked what the project cost is.  Mr. Wixson said it is projected to be near $10 million over the next 6 years.

 

Mr. Rowley asked if the control system is something that is computer based.  Mr. Wixson said there are portions of the building that are computer based, but they are obsolete.  The companies that had produced those control systems cannot upgrade the infrastructure that we have; it will require a replacement, and typically stay with the national lines.

 

Mrs. Ervin said that this is basically needed, we are not doing this because we feel like it; it has to be done.  Mr. Wixson agreed. 

 

Chairman Knapp asked if a lot of physical, duct work repair will need to be done where walls will be torn apart.  Mr. Wixson said that the intention is to do as much as possible without invasive, demolition of the historical finishes.  Between the floors are spaces where mechanics run, especially on the 5th floor where a lot of the distribution is.  Heating and cooling within the building are primarily along the windows.  There will be minor, wall surface repairs and floor repairs, but do not expect to have to invest a lot in rehabilitation of finishes from damage from upgrading the HVAC.

 

Mr. May suggested that when this items goes back to County Facilities Committee, that Mr. Wixson talk about the 4-year plan.  This is 10% of the total project; it sounds like this is needed and this type of work is expensive, but that type of perspective would be good.

 

d.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing LED Lighting Upgrades in Various Buildings in the Downtown Campus in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $535,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $444,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($444,000)

  • Upgrade different lighting conditions to new technologies, LED strategies for Justice Center garage, Oncenter garage, and Everson garage
  • Provide better illumination, more maintenance friendly – replacements and maintenance occurs about ¼  of what normal incandescent and fluorescent lights do now
  • Returns calculated from NYSERDA credits and National Grid incentives – would cost the county $90,000 more without the incentives
  • Biggest investment is the Justice center – has a failing lighting condition inherent with the original design and control system; LED lights won’t have that failure; 24/7 operation and lighting deteriorates 3 times as fast as normal buildings that are occupied and lit during the business day
  • Everson garage – in need of replacement
  • Convention Center garage – fluorescent lighting was replaced in 2010 – want to make LED strategy is the goal
  • Return on investments:  Justice Center – 6 yrs.; Everson and Convention Center – 3 yrs.

 

Mr. Jordan noted that it was indicated at County Facilities that the useful life was 4-5 years for LED lights.  Mr. Wixson said that useful life is beyond that.  “I may have said that the useful life was 4 -5 times what is in place now.”  The industry standard is 10 years.  

 

Mr. May asked how much of this is generally a one-time investment to accommodate LED lighting; how much is bulbs that will be replaced every 10 years.  Mr. Wixson said that this is not asking for funds for further replacements.  Mr. May said that he is asking how much is infrastructure cost within the project and how much is for things that will be replaced over time.  Mr. Wixson said that they are looking at a fixture for fixture replacement – take down the obsolete fixture, install and LED fixture.  The LED fixture will have a planned useful life of about 10 years; the Justice Center might be a little bit shorter.  Mr. Jordan asked if all fixtures will have to be replaced in 10 years.  Mr. Wixson said “not necessarily” -- that is what the manufacturer projects them at -- have found they go beyond.  For planning purposes we look at the 10-year period as reasonable target.

 

Chair Cody said that it is not a bulb that goes into that fixture.  Mr. Wixson said that they are a module of many bulbs.  Mr. Jordan asked about useful life of the bulbs themselves; Mr. Wixson said “about 10 years.”  Mr. Jordan said that the whole thing will go at once; Mr. Wixson agreed.  The maintenance is left to cleaning them and replacement of the optical lens.

 

e.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Downtown Steam Plant Improvements in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $700,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $700,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($700,000)

  • Elements of steam plant are beyond their expected useful life; put a $29K band-aid on a boiler recently
  • Control system – when bought it 22 yrs. ago there was a local vendor, company has been sold twice since then, parent company is in WV; can’t get any local support; they won’t give any upgrades on it and will only sell a new generation of control technology
  • IT is at a point where it is almost impossible to support them
  • Drain pan under cooling tower is corroded – pan is leaking, have patched it and had vendors come in – now on its last legs – need to replace
  • Chillers need coiling replacements; upgrade controls – bring up to current technology
  • 2 gen chillers – natural gas fired that power chillers; one has failed and the other causing maintenance difficulties; want to convert them to direct grid power – electricity is reasonable right now – want to use them and extend the life of the other 4 chillers

Mr. Jordan said that he understands at this point converting onto the grid, but no one can predict what will happen in the future and the situation could reverse again.  He asked how the cost compares with generating our own power to buying it off the grid.  Mr. Wixson said one has died and the cost to replace it is $150K; the other has repairs needed that exceed $30K.  The cost to convert to direct power is less than $50K. The risk of investing $50K to go to direct grid vs. a potential savings years down the road if utility costs reverse again, we are safer bringing them to grid power, and not banking on the return to high electrical costs.  In answer to Mr. Jordan, Mr. Wixson thought the generators date back to 2002.

 

Mr. May said that this is routine maintenance.

 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

8.     PARKS AND RECREATION:  Bill Lansley, Commissioner

a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Various Improvements to Parks and Recreation Areas in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $7,411,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $7,411,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($7,411,000)

  • Beaver Lake:  Loop Trail boardwalk was hand made between 1978-1987; deteriorated; have repaired, but in need of total replacement – water level increased and several parts of the boardwalk are under water completely during parts of the year – estimate $1.835 million
  • Hopkins Road Softball Park:  2009 eliminated management of the park; created a public/private partnership; have sole responsibility of maintaining and updating property and buildings – have had very little investment over the years
    • looking to add one turf field (all are turf now) – took till June for water to recede before the field was playable
    • replace fences – all are original to the park
    • replace light towers – one came down in a windstorm; 2 fields are lit
    • replace scoreboard – damaged in a windstorm
    • replace dug out canopies – are now mesh
    • repair garage/storage building – T11 siding and roofing exceeded usefulness
    • repave parking lot
    • Total $2 million
  • Long Branch Park Improvements - $1 million:
    • Office building was deemed unoccupiable by code and haven’t been able to use it for 5 years; have been renting a utility trailer for park operations for several years
    • Replace comfort station
    • Upgrade electrical services in shelters
  • Oneida Shores Park - $320,000:
    • 10 -12 year ago launch ramps were replaced with 5x5 concrete pre-cast panels; boats larger than it was designed for have “power loaded” their boats – the engine power has undermined the stone underneath the panels--will drain all of water around existing launch after boating season, take panels out and replace substructure; pour one solid concrete launch
    • Put in a new pay gate for boat launch
  • Various Projects:
    • Loomis Hill Cemetery – occasional flooding there – need to clean out, deepen, install retaining basin; will add a trench on Harris Hill side also with another retaining pond - $210,000
    • Onondaga Lake Park – Marina/Yacht Club area – replace water line (failed 3 times) and add hydrant - $90,000
    • Replace mechanical systems and components at various parks - $140,000:
      • Highland Forest, Pratts Falls – replace single wall gas tanks
      • Jamesville Beach – replace 20 yr. old hot water heater
      • Zoo – replace HVAC cooling tower
      • Beaver Lake – 2 oil boilers – had a flue problem in fall that smoked out the building; since then one has failed – want to replace both with propane heaters
      • LED projects – zoo around pond, Oneida Shores at Arrowhead lodge; Beaver Lake parking lot - $20,0000
      • Zoo – perform water study – have had elevated water bills – have increased usage; gone through all systems to assess that everything is being done to not cause elevated water loss; want to make sure that the pre 1984 infrastructure is still in good shape - $40,000
      • Onondaga Lake Park – replace small building around sewer pump area - $25,000
      • Beaver Lake – replace a garage and put up another  - $100,000
      • Beaver Lake – replace windows - $50,000
      • Beaver Lake – replace paneling in Community Room and floor tile - $25,000
      • Zoo – replace roof on contact barn - $200,000
    • Replace fences and barriers:
      • Zoo – around butterfly garden, penguin, white faced deer, and tiger exhibits - $111,000
      • Onondaga Lake Park – Good Dog Park - $100,000
      • Highland Forest, Pratts Falls, Skä noñh – replace access control barrier gates – steel swing gates - $25,000
  • Sawmill Creek – replace restroom – burned down in June - $400,000

 

Mr. May said that the 2021 allocation for Hopkins Road is included in the $7+ million total.  Mr. Lansley agreed, noting it is a 2-year ask; it’s $2 million for this ask.  In answer to Mr. May, Mr. Lansley said that a softball field will be turfed. 

 

Mr. Jordan said that $400K seems high for the Sawmill Creek restroom; they aren’t heated and are closed in the winter time.  He said for $400K you can buy a heck of a house with multiple bathrooms, bedrooms, and kitchens.  This is for a bare structure with stalls, urinals, and sinks.  Mr. Lansley said the $400,000 cost is based on other restrooms that they have constructed that aren’t anything other than ordinary.  In the past there has been a lot of in-house renovations of existing rest rooms with flooring materials, fixtures, etc., and they top at $50,000 - $60,000 just to replace the interiors.  He said that this is an entire large structure in the center of the park – probably the most used.  Mr. Jordan said that $50,000 to replace toilets is outrageous.  He said that he has done this work and you can buy a new toilet at Home Depot for $40.  Mr. Lansley said that this one is from the ground up; everything was destroyed.  Mr. Lansley said “it seems incredibly expensive to me, but that’s the number that we run when we put these restrooms out for bid.”

 

Mr. May asked that a list be brought to County Facilities Committee next month of the current project accounts, the balances, and what the intentions are for those dollars. 

 

9.     OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENT:  Travis Glazier, Director

a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Ash Tree Management in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $600,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $600,000 Bonds of said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($600,000)

  • 4th year of full funding
  • Removed 16,000 trees to date; preserved 399 (target was 2,300), 16,000 of 44,000 trees; 2,000 trees planted out of 4,400 target
  • Roughly 1/3 through target for removal; over halfway through target for replacement of trees
  • Because of bidding coming in lower, efficiencies with SWCD and their great work, able to decrease the ask; additionally should take few years than anticipated – coming in more quickly and under budget

Mr. May said that he has heard from a variety of different sources that this is ahead of schedule; things are going very well; it is great that this is reduced.  Based on conversations with Chairman Knapp and the county executive, he proposes that this be amended to reduce the amount by $75,000.  The thought being that if more is needed in 2020, then cash be used to do it. 

 

A motion was made by Mr. May to amend the resolution changing the amount to $525,000, seconded by Mr. Rowley.

 

Ms. Williams asked for the reason for the deduction.  Mr. May said that he and Chairman Knapp have spoken with the county executive, others have spoken with Soil & Water, and there is a pretty high level of confidence in the progress that we’ve made.  Being ahead of schedule is great; the work that has been done has been fantastic – no accidents, no injuries.  This is one area that could slow down a little bit or if there is an opportunity to continue the work and it’s a matter of finding cash to keep it going, in the course of the year we can do that.  Ms. Williams indicated that her question wasn’t answered and questioned why we are reducing the amount because we are doing good.  Mr. May said that we are ahead of schedule.  Chairman Knapp said that it is not often that we hear with a government project that we are both ahead of schedule and under budget.  He added that he can’t say enough about Soil & Water.  Mr. May said this is a long-term project; considered a check point; if wrong, we will find money to keep it going.  Chairman Knapp said it is much more targeted now, and this amount should take care of them for next year.

 

A vote was taken on the motion to amend the resolution.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

Mr. May made a motion to approve the resolution as amended, seconded by Mr. Rowley.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

10.   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: Kevin Sexton, CIO; Dr. Kathleen Corrado, Director of Labs

        a.     INFORMATIONAL -  BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Evidence Management System Upgrades in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $630,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $630,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($630,000)

Mr. Sexton:

  • IT is the primary support for Bar Coded Evidence Analysis Statistics and Tracking System (BEAST)
  • In this application environment there is no primary owner – it’s a shared systems environment; 3 primary owners are Forensic (Health Dept.), Sheriff’s Dept., and District Attorney’s Dept.; also 20 other area agencies contribute to evidence and property information
  • 10 years ago Dr. Corrado and her team led an effort via a grant to fund these; now the system is very old
  • BEAST shared services model is viewed as a best practice amongst other counties/jurisdictions that don’t have the luxury of information sharing as is done in this county with information systems
  • Upgrade is very needed – runs on old technology, runs on client/server platform which is no longer receiving updates/upgrades – in a risky environment
  • New version is web based – allows deploy to one server rather than dozens of pcs
  • Current version uses Citrix, which no longer is supported; on it because BEAST uses palm pilots for scanning/indexing of evidence inventory
  • New version affords faster inquiry – more evidence in a timely fashion; will allow better integration with other RMS applications and DEMS (digital evidence management system) used by the DA; allows better support with lab equipment and peripherals introduced into the environment
  • Will help agencies with stringent timeliness requirement for discovery as part of the NYS Criminal Justice Reform Act

 

Dr. Corrado:

  • System is heavily relied upon by all, including 20 agencies within the county
  • Does all evidence management, chain of custody, all ME reports, lab reports – agencies get them in real time
  • New system has a discovery module that will allow DA’s office to be able to click on all information in there that they need; currently they have to piece meal everything

 

Chair Cody asked if without this would they be able to comply with new, tight schedule for discovery.  Dr. Corrado said that the law was passed fairly quickly, and thrown at us without any funding.  She said that the DA’s office, police agencies, the lab are all doing their best to meet it and will try to do their best.  It is being done piece meal to compile things and it is going to be very difficult. 

 

Dr. Corrado continued:

  • Still needed – Citrix issues are huge, are not able to take advantage of upgrades that come in
  • Currently can’t store instrumental data; new system will allow putting it all in
  • It is like a one stop shop for lab and ME – would be very helpful

 

Mr. Sexton said that it is not a cure all for meeting the timeliness requirements, and are just getting arms around what it is all about.  Special meetings are being held to go over all of the concerns of all of the agencies.  January 1st will be a big eye opener and will have to work with it. 

 

Ms. Williams asked if there are grants available to help with this.  Dr. Corrado said that they looked into grants, but at this point those grants don’t exist anymore, like was secured 10 years ago to move to an electronic system.  Also, it is an upgrade and it is not easy to get grants for upgrades.

 

Mr. May said that he has had several conversations with the DA’s office about this; it is a real serious problem.  The discovery piece is not going away.  He feels the committee should vote to move forward on this.

 

Mr. Rowley asked if this is an off-the-shelf product.  Mr. Sexton said that it is – a third party product.  Dr. Corrado confirmed that they have customers throughout the country.  Mr. Rowley asked for the breakdown between hardware and software.  Mr. Sexton said that the bulk of it is professional services licensing – approximately $200,000.  He added that his team can do a lot of the upgrade and can probably bring the cost down by about $100,000.  In answer to Mr. Rowley, Mr. Sexton said that the vendor is Porter Lee.

 

Mr. May said that if this is still in negotiations, then maybe this be held off because of the number.  There is a very fast meeting schedule coming and maybe there could be some progress made on what the final number would be.  Dr. Corrado said that the final number might change on how much IT can do what the company can do in terms of getting it done in a short amount of time.  Mr. May explained that three are two sessions in December; if a vote isn’t taken today, it could be voted on at the next Ways & Means and at the second December session. 

 

Mr. Sexton said that he thinks they need to see the base project plan time line, if IT does it in conjunction with the vendor.  Mr. May asked if that would be known by the committee dates in December.  Dr. Corrado said that she is concerned as there are customizable projects in there and it has to be decided on how much it is going to take, and might not know until they really delve into it.  She is not sure if they are going to be able to do that in the next 3 – 4 weeks. 

 

Mrs. Ervin said that it could be authorized and they could use less.  Mr. May said that they would only bond for what is need.  Mr. Jordan said that there a number of projects that are $400,000 - $600,000 that they are looking to bond for – could take a look it and see if we really want to end up bonding for it or use cash.  Mrs. Ervin said that either way, it should be authorized today, as you lose time otherwise.

 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Ms. Williams, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

 

Chairman Knapped thanked Mr. Sexton and his team for his work on Election night, as there was a significant issue with the Board of Elections.  They were called at 9:30 – 10:00 p.m. to fix the problem.  The vendor was supposed to be doing it, but Mr. Sexton and his team saved us.  Otherwise, final results might not have been known for a couple of days.

 

11.   ONONDAGA COUNTY ACCOUNTABILITY & REINVESTING CORP.Robert Durr, County Attorney

        a.     Authorizing the Transfer of Tax Delinquent Properties to the Onondaga County Accountability & Reinvestment Corporation

  • Have a court approved agreement – an order between the parties in which the matter is settled
  • This is on the agenda in case of a default on the debting party; if that happens, there is a deed to foreclose immediately
  • It would not be enacted on unless there was a violation or failure to abide by the court order 

A motion was made by Mrs. Ervin, seconded by Mr. May, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

12.   SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT:  Matt Kearney, Captain-Correction Dept.; Ken Andrew, Chief/Civil Dept.

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Reconstruction/Construction of Improvements at the Corrections Facility in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $442,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $442,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($442,000)

Captain Kearney:

  • 2 projects: 
    • Repair roadways around parts of the facility:  mainly by warehouse/maintenance area – paving hasn’t been tended to in 30 years; pot holes, deterioration – unsafe; causes problems with snow removal – damages equipment; unable to use forklift because of uneven roads
    • Install air conditioning in Housing Unit 3 – part of the initial construction in 1982, never had air conditioning; buildings get very hot when temperature is warm; humidity spikes; when people get hot and agitated, a lot of bad things can happen; officers now required to wear stab proof vests which increases their heat; a lot of moisture problems – causing deterioration of metal; currently installing air conditioning in Housing Unit 4 – this is a 4 year program

 

Mr. Rowley asked if next year Unit 2 will be done, followed by Unit 1.  Captain Kearney confirmed that was correct.

 

        b.     Transfer from Sheriff’s Office, Account 641010 Regular Employee Salaries, to Sheriff’s Office, Account 641020 Overtime Wages, $1,640,296

Chief Andrews:

  • Transfer needed to cover overtime budget

Mr. May said that this is not unlike prior years; the overall projection is approaching $900,000 to the good.  Transferring within departments is what is done – have to fill vacancies and when there are vacancies there has to be overtime.  The Sheriff is once again going to balance the budget to the positive at the end of the year.

 

A motion was made by Mr. May, seconded by Mrs. Ervin, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

13.   EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS:  Julie Corn, Commissioner

Mr. May stated that this is one area where he sees opportunity to move a couple of things through.  He asked Ms. Corn to give a sense of what came through last year that was vivificated, moved out and put off, and to also provide what would be able to move with the department should they ever move (in the future).

 

Ms. Corn said that in common with all of the CIP projects is that the systems/equipment has either reached or gone beyond their end of life, or are obsolete with new technology coming.  They are all essential in order to meet public safety demands, expectations for the community and first responders. 

 

        a.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Auxiliary Power Systems Replacement at E911 Main Center in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $688,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $688,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($688,000)

  • Proposed last year and did not get funded
  • Back-up generator and uninterrupted power supply (UPS) – required to maintain power in power failure or major storm
  • Gives generator redundancy – preventing from going to back up center during power outage
  • Want 2 generators to be able to back each of the generators up in the event of a power failure, which is a real fear and has happened on multiple occasions
  • Current generator is over 25 years old; UPS manufactured in 2003 and has a service life of 15-20 yrs.
  • Actively trying to fund this through NYS grants; if success will not need to bond this 

        b.     INFORMATIONAL - BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing Engineering and Bid Specification Work in Connection with the Next Generation 911 Telephone System Replacement/Refresh Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $212,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $212,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($212,000)

  • New request
  • Replacement or refresh – multi-year request:  $212K for consultant to assist in developing the RFP; in later years requesting funding for the system itself
  • Next generation 911 is coming; it’s a when question – do not have control of when that will happen
  • Current call taking solution was installed in 2016 – will reach end of life in 2021
  • Replace 43 work stations – 27 at main 911 site, 16 at back up
  • Have a little time with this one

Mrs. Ervin said that all of the money would be for the consultant; Ms. Corn agreed.  In answer to Mrs. Ervin, Ms. Corn said that subsequent to that the cost will be $3.5 million, but are hoping the consultant can help cut that cost down.

 

Mr. Jordan asked if there is any opportunity for federal or state grant assistance.  Ms. Corn said that they will look into it – does not know.  She said they are waiting on the state for the next generation system to be ready.  It is a nationwide program, but a lot depends on the state and what they are deciding to do.

 

c.     INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Replacement of the Makyes Radio Tower in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $265,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $265,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($265,000)

  • Request has been on the table but not funded
  • 2018 – replaced Rose Hill tower, built in 1960’s; Makyes is the next oldest tower
  • If it were to fall, it is a hazard to surrounding environment
  • Part of the county interoperable communication system – the radio system for all first responders; connects also to surrounding counties
  • To loose even one tower, the system would render itself weaker and have weaker connectivity in adjacent areas

 

A motion was made by Mr. May to approve this item, seconded by Mrs. Ervin.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        d.     INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION:  Resolution Authorizing the Replacement of Mobile Data Communications Network Infrastructure in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $3,600,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $3,600,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($3,600,000)

  • Proposed last year and did not get funded
  • Affects 911 and all first responders – system past end of life in 2017; system is over 10 years old
  • Replace with a system that would provide another 10 years
  • This is the highest priority – affects every public safety agency
  • Network that connects 911 dispatcher to the first responder vehicles – laptops talking to computers on dispatchers desk – CAD
  • Automatic vehicle location runs through this network; if loose the network, we lose that capability and left with only the radio system
  • Runs CAD location data – allows dispatch and first responders to add note, access multiple data basis – runs on wireless broadband technology
  • Project would supply modems, hardware, and software
  • Complex project – stops short of paying for subscriptions – will discuss at operational budget time
  • Leaders in this communication space; provided first responders with equipment in the past – modems, radios, laptops; don’t provide all equipment but tend to do it when there is roll out of something new; effective as it keeps everybody on the same page
  • No disparities of people having to buy equipment on their own and our folks having to repair different types of equipment
  • Has taken a long time to get too – getting questions from police and fire chiefs as to whether or not the county will help pay for this.  They have had to come up with solutions on their own to get by
  • Some agencies may already have some the equipment that is they needed; once approved, will do a poll to see who has something out there that is affective, but for the remainder will need to replace the modems

Mr. May said that this was the number one thing that came up at the county firemen’s annual legislative event. 

 

Mr. Jordan said that this is replacing the main infrastructure, not the laptops.  Mr. Sparks said that it is the communication for the 911 center to the laptops in the vehicles – commercial broadband. 

 

In answer to Mr. Rowley, Ms. Corn said that this is not radios.  Mr. Rowley said that there were project reports in 2017 – phase 1 and phase 2, and asked if those are still valid.  Mr. Corn said that they are and explained that they had a consultant help with this project and are looking to pick up where they left off.  Phase 1 and 2 are still relevant and are going to look at any difference in costs.  The recommendations remain the same. 

 

Mr. May said that the equipment necessary to the agencies will be supplied by the county and the subscription will be on the agency.  Ms. Corn said that is the second half of the discussion – need to discuss whether or not the county will pay for the subscription.  This does not include the subscription conversation.  Mr. May said that is relevant because it is expensive and volunteer agencies will need to actually budget – it would not be something they can absorb in a regular budget.  Chairman Knapp asked how much a subscription cost.  Mr. Sparks said about $34/month per modem – there are about 800 for first responders.

 

Mrs. Ervin said that this entails looking at what equipment they have.  Ms. Corn agreed noting that the reality is the most fire departments do not, some of the police agencies and EMS might. 

 

e.     INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Oblique Aerial Digital Imagery Refresh Project in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $300,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $300,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($300,000)

  • Project proposed last year and did not get funded
  • Airplane flyer over of Onondaga County
  • Oblique imagery is imagery taken at an angle as opposed to directly down
  • Effective for 911 – dispatchers have 4 or 5 screens up and one of them is this imagery
  • It is used for every single call – able to see, i.e. if it’s a 3 story building or a 1 story building; information aids the first responder and keeps them informed when they are about to approach an incident
  • Also used by SOCPA, City of Syracuse, all towns and villages and the public – a great investment
  • Current is 5 years old; need to be updated every 4 years to be effective

 

Mr. May said that it provides public safety to personnel.  He likens this to the tower situation – have bought ourselves a year, but things change out there: structures, roads, facilities, access, etc. and feels this is an important thing to do.

 

In answer to Chairman Knapp, Ms. Corn said that the time to do this is in the spring – after the snow melts and before the leaves come.  This is the ideal time to approve this – have a proposal ready to go.  In answer to Mr. Jordan, Ms. Corn said that the company is looking to get it done by the end of the year. 

 

A motion was made by Ms. Williams, seconded by Mr. Rowley, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

        f.      INFORMATIONAL – BOND RESOLUTION:  A Resolution Authorizing the Repaving of the E911 Center Parking Lot in and for the County of Onondaga, New York, at a Maximum Estimated Cost of $344,000, and Authorizing the Issuance of $344,000 Bonds of Said County to Pay Costs Thereof ($344,000)

  • New CIP project
  • Parking lot is 30 years old, deteriorating, pot holes that have to be filled constantly, stripes are less and less defined
  • Gap from pavement to sidewalk is 6” high in parts
  • Ground sensors at security gate fail all the time
  • Conduits that run the course of the parking lot for major utilities – power, phone, internet, natural gas
  • Needs to definitely get done in the near future

         g.     Personnel Resolution:  Advance Step L106549, Deputy Commissioner Emergency Communications (Operations), from Grade 35 Step G to Grade 35 Step M, December 3, 2019

  • Starting salary $77,000 –  step M moves salary to $85,000
  • The previous deputy retired in Sept.; selected a replacement who has over 30 years’ experience dispatching at Sheriff’s office and been with 911 center since inception
  • Has come put through the ranks and recently served as senior shift supervisor, focus on administration, training, and professional standards; was no. 3 person in leadership chain and acted on behalf of the commissioner and deputy commissioner on multiple occasions; is well respected amongst peers and partners
  • Has earned more than this request in the past with being a union employee and able to work overtime; this is a pay cut for him
  • No impact on  budget

Mr. Rowley noted that it was indicated at Public Safety Committee that this individual had made in the neighborhood of $100,000.  Ms. Corn agreed that he did last year.

 

A motion was made by Ms. Ervin, seconded by Mr. May, to approve this item.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

14.   FINANCE:

a.     Monthly Report - Double Encumbered Positions (Res. 86-2018)

report

 

  • One position dropped off; 7 remain
  • 4 will be gone as of the 1st of pay period 2020 – positions created in 2020 budget
  • 2 of the others may be off by year end

 

        b.     Third Quarter Report

Mr. Morgan distributed the following:

 

report

 

report

report

report

report

report

 

report

report

Summary indicators, pg. 1

  • Most are in line with this time last year, except sales tax
  • Sales tax - 3rd qtr. last year was up over 8% growth; this year just one 1% growth

 

3rd Qtr. Forecast, pg. 2:

  • Revenues $820 million; expenses $815 million
  • $6.1 million surplus at this point to end 2019
  • Will add dollar for dollar to fund balance
  • No fund balance appropriated to balance 2019 or 2020 budget

Revenue:

  • Property tax, deferred/uncollectible property tax, PILOTs/interest & penalties – off budget by $1.7 million; numbers can swing significantly at close of year
  • Sales tax – projection of 3%; if don’t meet that, the surplus will go down; usually last 7 payments are fairly strong
  • Federal/state aid – usually in line with mandated spending; there are a number in state aid that are having an impact:  Raise the Age expenses that were never incurred because they were in contingency and never needed to be released.  That is dollar for dollar state aid – if you don’t spend the money, you don’t get the aid.

Appropriations:

  • Mandates – continue to struggle with foster care – looking at $5 million deficit
  • Co. executive initiative to open Sycamore House to try to address high need, high level children that are shipped out of state at a high rate of cost; hope is to keep children in the community and provide service at lower cost and return them to a permanent setting sooner than they typically would be
  • Other mandates trending below budget – when rolled up, still projecting a surplus
  • Wages – continue to review each/every vacancy as it pertains to the budget; request departments to take a look at ability to do without; working with departments to make sure staffed at appropriate level
  • Benefits – at budget; projecting to be slightly under; health spending will come in under budget
  • Contractual services – a lot is state pass through money
  • Sales tax – non county – pass through for city and small amount shared with school districts
  • Everything else is roughly in line with budget
  • There is not a ton or room for error with $6 million;
  • If sales tax projections are missed, even in end flat, will still exceed budget in that line because of how 2018 ended with 7% growth; if the mark is missed this year, it will put us behind next year

 

Fund Balance Analysis:

  • Hasn’t changed since previous report
  • $70.4 million in unassigned fund balance - none has been appropriated throughout the year
  • 10.8% of general fund revenues, $5.3 million over 10% goal
  • Hope is to end 2019 and add another $5 - $6 million to it – would help with fiscal stress levels with state comptroller and bond rating agencies

Mr. Rowley asked what the second quarter forecast was.  Mr. Morgan said it was roughly in the same range – about $5 million.  He added that a lot depends on the last sales tax payments; should not see a lot of variance in spending.

 

Mr. Jordan referred to sales tax projections and noted that the 4th quarter tends to go up because of holidays.  Mr. Morgan said that they look year over, look at trends from previous years, look at how much of the last quarter is a percentage of the total every year.  If the mark isn’t met for 2019, we can put in types of austerity measures for 2020.  There are some other things out there that can be relied upon if need be; there are some savings coming from Medicare Advantage, from joint RFP with Oswego on pharmaceuticals – prescription benefits for employees.  

 

Chairman Knapp asked if fuel is one-third of sales tax.  Mr. Morgan said it varies.  He noted that sales tax is strong now city-wide, which is encouraging. 

 

Chairman Knapp referred to foster care being $11 million under.  Mr. Morgan said that the county gets revenue on foster care expenses; it will be dollar for dollar.  Chairman Knapp said that last year it was $ 7 million over.  Mr. Morgan said that part of last year was that they missed the mark a little bit on the budgeting side; part of is the costly placement of kids.

 

15.   LAW DEPARTMENT:  Carol Rhinehart, Deputy County Attorney 3

        a.     Litigation update

 

A motion was made by Mr. Jordan, seconded by Ms. Williams to enter into executive session to discuss the matters of Rebecka Ozimek vs. Jefferey E. Skeele, Holbrook Heating, Inc., Town of Pompey, County of Onondaga; Jeffrey E. Skeele and Holbrook Heating, Inc. vs. Troy A. Simiele and Mark A. Simiele; County of Onondaga vs. Troy A. Simiele and Mark A. Simiele.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

A motion was made by Mr. Jordan, seconded by Ms. Williams, to exit executive session and enter regular session.  Passed unanimously; MOTION CARRIED.

 

Chair Cody stated for the record that no actions or motions were taken during executive session.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

signature

DEBORAH L. MATURO, Clerk

Onondaga County Legislature

 




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